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By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,sun reporter | March 24, 2007
She thinks he has funny hair. He thinks she's fat. She called him a "snake oil salesman." He called her a "loser." They've been badmouthing each other on the airwaves since December with the kind of bullying bluster most of us outgrow in junior high school. We can't make it stop, but we can decide who's more annoying. Rosie O'Donnell and Donald Trump are going head to head in the current round of March Madness: Celebrity Version, our NCAA-style tournament devised to determine, through your online votes, the celebrity of whom we are most weary.
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NEWS
By HARVEY PEKAR and HARVEY PEKAR,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2006
On Michael Jackson Margo Jefferson Pantheon / 160 pages Here's a volume about Michael Jackson by Margo Jefferson, Pulitzer Prize-winning cultural critic for The New York Times. The blurb accompanying this slim book calls it "a bracing, personal and deeply thoughtful reflection on the cultural significance of Michael Jackson." Well, certainly Jefferson has reflected long and hard about Jackson. Her precise, evocative prose is a pleasure to read. She's nonjudgmental when it comes to characterizing Jackson, refusing to rip him as a slimeball on the one hand, or label him a misunderstood martyr on the other.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | December 29, 2005
Every week of 2005 seemed to bring more turbulence and upheaval in the world of entertainment and in the personal -- but very public -- lives of the people who bring it to us. First, no one was going to the movies. Then everyone was downloading TV shows onto their iPods. We all wondered what was in the hatch on Lost; we were surprised -- but not that surprised -- to see Michael Jackson show up at court in his pajamas; and Brad and Jen broke our hearts. The awful practice of combining names of celebrity couples reached new heights of awfulness: TomKat, Bennifer II and Brangelina, the one that sounds like a cereal no one would want to eat. It was all so much to cram into one year, we'll take it one month at a time.
FEATURES
July 2, 2005
Brooke Shields sounds off against Cruise's tirade Brooke Shields took aim at Tom Cruise's Today show diatribe against antidepressants, saying the drugs helped her survive feelings of hopelessness after the birth of her first child. "I'm going to take a wild guess and say that Mr. Cruise has never suffered from postpartum depression," she wrote in an op-ed piece published yesterday in The New York Times. Cruise had criticized the actress for taking the drugs, and became particularly passionate about the issue in an interview on Today last week.
TOPIC
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
After the court clerk announced the jury's "not guilty" verdict to each charge of child abuse against Michael Jackson, many people argued over whether the system was broken. The system they were debating was the legal one - not the Internet, which has made major strides over the past decade in being able to shoulder major breaking news like the Jackson trial verdict. Seven years ago, news and government sites choked when thousands of people tried to download the report from Independent Counsel Kenneth W. Starr about President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Michael Jackson needed to be innocent like Richard Kimble. Instead, he's "not guilty" like O.J. Simpson. The key to the distinction lies in what a juror said after the pop singer was acquitted Monday. Juror Raymond Hultman told reporters he believes Mr. Jackson might have molested boys in the past, but that the prosecution did not prove its contention that he molested the specific boy at the center of this case. It's not what you'd call a ringing endorsement. Thus the Michael Jackson trial comes to an end, and not a second too soon.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 17, 2005
NEW YORK - Every media circus needs its sideshow. Michael Jackson's acquittal Monday appeared to leave the Rev. Al Sharpton, a Jackson adviser and major megaphone for racial anger, in the awkward position of having precious little to be angry about. "I think the criminal justice system has worked this time," Mr. Sharpton shouted over the midtown Manhattan traffic into a bouquet of microphones. "I think this is a vindication for people that believe people are innocent until proven guilty.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2005
LOS ANGELES - To thank selected fans for their allegiance during his child-molestation trial, Michael Jackson and his family plan an invitation-only bash tomorrow night at the Chumash Casino in Santa Ynez, Calif. - although it is not clear if the self-described King of Pop will be on stage. Jackson, 46, was acquitted Monday on all counts of molestation and conspiracy after a 14-week trial that brought throngs of his most ardent fans to the steps of the courthouse in Santa Maria, Calif.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2005
There was a time, not very long ago, when Michael Jackson was indeed the undisputed king of pop, ruling the charts and the airwaves with an exciting, charged and highly individual style. That was 1982, when an album he made called Thriller revolutionized the music industry and went on to sell more than 40 million copies worldwide. Today, no one sells albums at Thriller's level: Last year's top-selling album, Usher's Confessions, sold more than 8 million copies. Thriller, in its first year of release, sold 26 million.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Michael Jackson. Robert Blake. Kobe Bryant. And before them all, O.J. Simpson. The facts, the accusations, the lawyers and the reliability of witnesses were quite different in each case. However, the acquittal of Jackson on all counts against him has prompted a debate again among the public and in legal circles of what role celebrity plays in America's criminal justice system. Perhaps, as some defense lawyers suggested and supporters of Jackson contended, ambitious prosecutors go after the innocent or bring exceedingly weak cases, which jurors spot readily.
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