Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMichael Jackson
IN THE NEWS

Michael Jackson

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Geoff Boucher and Cara Dimassa and Geoff Boucher and Cara Dimassa,Tribune Newspapers | July 8, 2009
LOS ANGELES - Music legends, sports figures and civil rights leaders paid tribute to Michael Jackson as a music pioneer and a barrier-breaking cultural figure during an emotional, song-filled service Tuesday at Staples Center. Audience members danced along to musical performances and stifled tears at some of the many tributes to the singer. There were shouts from the audience of "Power to the people," "Long live the king" and "We miss you Michael!" The most poignant moment came at the end, with Jackson's 11-year-old daughter Paris Michael Katherine Jackson - in tears - telling the audience from the stage, "I just wanted to say, ever since I was born, Daddy has been the best father you can imagine.
Advertisement
NEWS
By From Sun news services | July 2, 2009
Jackson's will leaves estate in trust; memorial is planned Michael Jackson's 7-year-old will, dated July 7, 2002, was filed Wednesday in a Los Angeles court, giving his entire estate to a family trust while making his mother the guardian of his children and cutting out his former wife, Debbie Rowe. Court documents estimated the current value of his estate at more than $500 million. Also Wednesday, a Jackson family spokesman said a public memorial for Michael Jackson is in the works, but it won't be held at the late pop star's Neverland Ranch.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan and Harriet Ryan,Tribune Newspapers | June 29, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -A lawyer for Michael Jackson's personal physician said Sunday that reports that the doctor injected the pop star with a powerful painkiller before his death were "absolutely false." "There was no Demerol. No OxyContin," said Edward Chernoff, the attorney for Dr. Conrad Murray. The lawyer, who was present Saturday for Murray's three-hour interview with Los Angeles Police Department detectives, said Jackson was already unconscious when the doctor "fortuitously" entered the bedroom of the performer's Holmby Hills mansion.
NEWS
By Andrew Blankstein, Rong-Gong Lin II, Harriet Ryan and Scott Gold and Andrew Blankstein, Rong-Gong Lin II, Harriet Ryan and Scott Gold,Tribune Newspapers | June 28, 2009
LOS ANGELES - - Los Angeles police completed an "extensive interview" Saturday night with the doctor who was with Michael Jackson when the pop star went into cardiac arrest, and a source close to the investigation said detectives found "no red flag" during discussions about the death. A private pathologist, meanwhile, conducted a second autopsy on Jackson's body, hours after it was released to relatives by the Los Angeles County coroner. Coroner's officials had said that Jackson had been using prescription drugs, and the investigation is focused on whether Jackson overdosed.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | June 28, 2009
Her name was Natalie, and she was dying of cancer. She was 9 years old, I think, and one of those groups that grants wishes to terminally ill children had offered to make hers come true. Her wish was simple, she wanted a big party for her 10th birthday, but of course it was also heartbreaking because there would not be an 11th. Her doctor knew it, her family knew it and Natalie - because she was close to a boy who was at her same stage of cancer and had recently died - knew it. I thought about Natalie and her sweet, sad party the other day, more than 25 years after I'd written a story about it for the newspaper I was working for back then.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 28, 2009
Despite Michael Jackson's efforts to ensure it would not happen, many Americans tuned out long ago. A lot of us stopped watching some time in the 1990s. It's not only that he became too strange and freaky, and even creepy; it's that he became tragic. And if there's one thing we can't bear to watch, it's the transformation of greatness - in this case, that of an extravagantly talented American superstar - into tragedy. A team of psychiatrists might one day conclude that Michael Jackson suffered from a profound mental disorder.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | June 27, 2009
Michael Jackson had it all as a pop star - catchy beats, an unmistakable voice, inimitable dance moves and a distinctive look. But he also had it all when it came to celebrity dysfunction. In his 50 years, he managed to embody virtually all the tropes of weird celebrity that dominate the tabloids. To wit: * Preternatural child stardom. You've got your demanding stage parents and a performer who is at once sweet and innocent and mature beyond his years. Think of him as an early JonBenet Ramsey.
NEWS
By Robert Lloyd and Robert Lloyd,Tribune Newspapers | June 26, 2009
HOLLYWOOD - - Michael Jackson was the first great pop star whose career was shaped by television - not merely showcased by it, like those of Elvis Presley and the Beatles - and inseparable from the medium. He was indebted to it and influenced it in turn. Across his four-decade career, he was often someone to listen to, but he was always - for better and sometimes for worse - something to see. A lifetime of pictures came back into focus Thursday, as cable news outlets ran bits of old videos and Facebook bloomed with links to YouTube clips.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan, Chris Lee and Scott Gold and Harriet Ryan, Chris Lee and Scott Gold,Tribune Newspapers | June 26, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -Michael Jackson, a seminal figure in music, dance and culture whose ever-changing face graced the covers of albums that sold more than a half-billion copies, died Thursday, shortly after going into cardiac arrest at his Holmby Hills chateau. He was 50 years old. He spent much of his life as among the world's most famous people, and to many, his death felt unthinkable and, oddly, inevitable. "For Michael to be taken away from us so suddenly at such a young age, I just don't have the words," said Quincy Jones, who produced Thriller.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.