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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
Michael Jackson, the Ravens wide receiver, already has one office in the city -- on 33rd Street. Now he is setting up another -- in East Baltimore.At a downtown news conference yesterday, Jackson announced that his new record production company, Big Play Entertainment, will be based on Biddle Street in East Baltimore. The football star said the company will provide record deals -- and eventually jobs -- to Baltimore-area residents."Wherever I am, I feel it is my home, and it's my job to give back to it," said Jackson, who will be the company's president and primary financial source.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Recording superstar Michael Jackson returned to his Neverland Ranch a free man yesterday after a jury acquitted him of charges that he had plied a 13-year-old cancer patient with alcohol, molested him, then conspired to imprison the boy and his family. The verdict brought vindication for the embattled performer, whose close relationships with young boys have been questioned for more than a decade. Jackson, 46, had previously paid multimillion-dollar settlements to two accusers, and he had told a British TV interviewer that his sleepovers with children were a "beautiful thing."
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
Maturation. Self-actualization. Identity. Psychologists offer ample terms to describe leaving childhood and becoming a free-thinking adult. Leon Franklin Bean III, 28, of Baltimore, had more than his share of obstacles doing so. Small and sensitive, he was bullied a lot. Other kids called him Four-Eyes for the glasses he wore. He grew apart from friends and, later, lost one of his closest in a senseless murder. Bean withdrew into himself and felt alone. Who could have guessed he would transcend his troubles by studying, emulating - and ultimately inhabiting - the King of Pop?
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1997
They have blossomed into one of the NFL's most productive and dangerous tandems, and Ravens receivers Michael Jackson and Derrick Alexander have a message for cornerbacks charged with stopping them.Bring it on. Take your best shot. In the end, it won't be good enough."We feel like we can beat any corners. We always feel we're going to have a big day if we go out and execute," Alexander said. "We know it's going to be tough for them to cover both of us.""After the first half of last season, when we were killing some of the so-called better corners in the league, we knew we could beat any of them," Jackson said.
NEWS
By Harriet Ryan, Chris Lee and Scott Gold and Harriet Ryan, Chris Lee and Scott Gold,Tribune Newspapers | June 26, 2009
LOS ANGELES - -Michael Jackson, a seminal figure in music, dance and culture whose ever-changing face graced the covers of albums that sold more than a half-billion copies, died Thursday, shortly after going into cardiac arrest at his Holmby Hills chateau. He was 50 years old. He spent much of his life as among the world's most famous people, and to many, his death felt unthinkable and, oddly, inevitable. "For Michael to be taken away from us so suddenly at such a young age, I just don't have the words," said Quincy Jones, who produced Thriller.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 1997
Has the King of Pop turned into the King of Flop?Michael Jackson may be one of pop music's most eccentric performers, but he's also one of its most dependable hit-makers. In addition to having released the highest-selling album in history, 1982's "Thriller," he has generated a dozen No. 1 pop singles -- a feat only Elvis Presley and the Beatles have been able to better. Add in his career with the Jackson 5, and he has been Top of the Pops for 28 of his 38 years.But that hot streak has come to an abrupt end with his new album, "Blood on the Dance Floor: HIStory in the Mix."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 14, 2005
Child star. King of Pop. Poster child for plastic surgery. Accused child molester. What will Michael Jackson's next act be? While Jackson was once the most-popular entertainer in the world, his reputation has taken a battering during his trial on charges of molesting a 13-year- old cancer survivor. "The Michael Jackson brand is effectively dead," said Ronn Torossian, president and CEO of 5W Public Relations, which has handled such high-profile clients as fashion and music mogul Sean "P. Diddy" Combs and rapper Jay-Z.
NEWS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
Ravens receiver Michael Jackson has created a new identity.After years of living in the shadows of Reggie Langhorne, Webster Slaughter, Brian Brennan and Andre Rison, Jackson has emerged as one of the Ravens' marquee players on and off the field.Jackson was one of the three players invited to the city when the team's name was unveiled and one of a trio to model the new uniforms. He is articulate, has a warm smile and a radio and TV deal in town.And he leads the team in receptions with 17 for 253 yards and two touchdowns.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1997
Baltimore's fledgling music industry has had limited success. The few record companies based here have earned their 15 seconds of fame with mostly one-hit-wonders -- hardly enough to put the area on the map.But since Ravens wide receiver Michael Jackson based his Big Play Entertainment company on Biddle Street in August, he's taken slow, methodical steps to give the area a hefty chunk of the billion-dollar music industry.The young company is moving quickly in an attempt to make Baltimore a desirable entertainment haven.
FEATURES
By Robin Clark and Robin Clark,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1993
He'd had eight hours of sleep in six days. One more cup of coffee would send his brain into seizure. And a lady holding on Line 1 thought he was a vulture.But there was no time to worry about that.It was 10 minutes to deadline Tuesday at the Hollywood studios of "A Current Affair," and, as the crew scrambled frantically to wrap up the Big Story, bureau chief Mike Watkiss was beginning to wonder if this was the day it finally happened -- "dead air." In 10 minutes, the show would be fed by satellite to Fox Television subscribers around the globe -- with or without his contribution.
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