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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 20, 1996
SUN CITY, South Africa -- The centerpiece of this resort in South Africa's Northwest Province is the fake ruin of a fictitious kingdom. Inside one of its main ballrooms yesterday was a fake old wall, complete with fake cracks, flanked by fake stretched animal skins.It was the perfect locale for a fake press conference.Since his arrival in Johannesburg on Wednesday, Michael Jackson's every footstep has been followed by a breathless South African press, starting with his arrival at the airport before a mob of adoring fans.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Michael Jackson needed to be innocent like Richard Kimble. Instead, he's "not guilty" like O.J. Simpson. The key to the distinction lies in what a juror said after the pop singer was acquitted Monday. Juror Raymond Hultman told reporters he believes Mr. Jackson might have molested boys in the past, but that the prosecution did not prove its contention that he molested the specific boy at the center of this case. It's not what you'd call a ringing endorsement. Thus the Michael Jackson trial comes to an end, and not a second too soon.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | January 9, 1992
INSPIRED by the success of the inaugural 1990 Chutzpah Awards (I deeply appreciate the touching letters I received from the Wyoming State Hospital for the Criminally Insane), I have decided to continue the tradition and hand out awards for 1991.Without further ado, let's get right to the deserving winners:* Special "Say What?" Chutzpah Award: Every now and then along comes a comment so egregious that the listener is compelled to utter, "Say what?" The winners in this category are those who opposed the concept of all-male schools for black boys because they would "reinforce segregation."
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1991
Washington--Another unauthorized biography. Another no-holds-barred, warts-and-all portrait of a glitzy, high-profile, enigmatic figure. Another hefty tome of sex, lies and, in this case, videotapings. More luscious scandal. More good dirt.But Michael Jackson biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli, a white kid from Philly who used to dream of being one of the Temptations, wants to make one thing clear:He's no Kitty Kelley.On a tour to promote "Michael Jackson, The Magic and the Madness," Mr. Taraborrelli has heard it over and over again: "People like you and Kitty Kelley . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | October 29, 2009
How much of "Michael Jackson's This Is It" can we believe? Was Jackson, 50 at the time of his death on June 25, in rougher shape overall than the concert rehearsal footage assembled here suggests? Most certainly, yes. Produced with the watchful cooperation of the Jackson estate, pulled from 100-plus hours of film and video shot between March and June 2009, "This Is It" has no interest in telling the full story of anything. Rather, director Kenny Ortega - Jackson's partner in staging the London concert that was never to be - is simply trying to suggest in some detail what sort of overstuffed career retrospective Jackson was attempting.
FEATURES
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,New York Daily News | September 7, 1995
You wouldn't know it from watching MTV's Video Music Awards, but most stars don't have all that much to do with their videos.The majority just flash a quick thumbs up or down on ideas dreamed up by others, show up on the day of the shoot and hit their marks.None of which stops the big-name stars from seizing the lion's share of attention each year at the MTV awards ceremony (which takes place for the 12th time tonight at 8 p.m. on the cable channel). At the shindig, you'll see the usual brand names -- Michael Jackson, Green Day, TLC -- beaming over the statuettes, while the real visionaries -- Michel Gondry, Michael Haussman, Mark Romanek -- remain glued to their seats behind rows of record-company heads of promotion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Michael Jackson. Robert Blake. Kobe Bryant. And before them all, O.J. Simpson. The facts, the accusations, the lawyers and the reliability of witnesses were quite different in each case. However, the acquittal of Jackson on all counts against him has prompted a debate again among the public and in legal circles of what role celebrity plays in America's criminal justice system. Perhaps, as some defense lawyers suggested and supporters of Jackson contended, ambitious prosecutors go after the innocent or bring exceedingly weak cases, which jurors spot readily.
NEWS
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Mr. Considine is The Sun's pop music critic | May 26, 1991
MICHAEL JACKSON: THE MAGIC AND THE MADNESS.J. Randy Taraborrelli.Birch Lane Press.625 pages. $21.95.There are really only two kinds of pop-star biography. One is diligent and scholarly, using personal events to explain artistic achievement; the other is dramatic and scandalous, peeling back the layers of fame to expose all sorts of failings and foibles, as if the performer's flaws were only occasionally redeemed by artistic success.Want to guess which category "Michael Jackson: The Magic and the Madness" falls into?
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
M.C. Hammer owns a racehorse.So does Michael Jackson."But I don't have a white glove. And, so far, I haven't had a facelift," a portly 54-year-old Englishman, who has the same name as the American pop star, quipped yesterday at Fair Hill race course.The British Michael Jackson is a well-to-do horse owner, who makes money by importing paper from Scandanavia and selling it to British publishing companies. He spends money by owning seven racehorses and globe-trotting them around the world.His best horse is a remarkable jumper named Morley Street.
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Jean Guccione and Henry Weinstein and Jean Guccione,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 14, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Last fall, defense attorney Thomas Mesereau made a strategic move that may have provided the key to Michael Jackson's court victory yesterday: He hired a new private investigator and told him to focus relentlessly on the accuser's mother. Scott Ross had worked on the defense of Robert Blake, successfully digging up unsavory items about Blake's slain wife that allowed defense lawyers to argue that someone other than Blake had a motive to kill her. Moreover, the information gave jurors a reason to dislike her. Mesereau wanted a repeat performance, Ross recalled yesterday.
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