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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Hallways were packed. Security was tight. Finally, the elevator doors opened, and there he was. Michael Jackson was in the House. As in, the House of Representatives. Jackson was there to join a few members of Congress and officials from a dozen African nations to call attention to the ravages of AIDS in their countries. They met for more than an hour, and afterward, at a news conference outside her office, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a Texas Democrat, who served as host, held his hand and thanked him. She said, "Mr. Jackson's voice will be able to be utilized in this campaign of awareness."
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 31, 1993
How am I supposed to explain this Michael Jackson thing to my children?If you have any ideas about how I should tell my 9-year-old son and my 7-year-old daughter what their hero is accused of doing with little boys, please send them along, because I am at a loss.This is Michael Jackson, who stars so elegantly in a video titled "Smooth Criminal" as the playmate and protector of children. This is Michael Jackson, who performs with a pint-sized United Nations on stage. This is Michael Jackson, who flies terminally ill children to his combination ranch-petting zoo-amusement park home.
FEATURES
By David J. Fox and David J. Fox,Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1991
Michael Jackson's new music video, "Black and White," was scheduled to make its debut on nationwide TV last night, but another of the entertainer's projects remains under heavy wraps: a deal with Sony Pictures Entertainment to develop a movie titled "MidKnight."Is it the story of a meek young man by day who secretly changes into a heroic singing and dancing knight at the stroke of midnight?A Sony executive declined comment.But he did say that the storyline based on Mr. Jackson's idea would encompass elements of action and, of course, music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Lynch and Stephen Lynch,Orange County Register | July 31, 1995
Say what you will about Michael Jackson, the word "small" is not in his vocabulary.While most celebrities are content to hitch their wagon to one on-line service provider for a cyberspace promotional event, the self-styled King of Pop has corraled all three major service providers -- plus the general Internet -- for an evening of moonwalking.The event, to be held at 7 p.m. Aug. 17, is the first chat simulcast. Although other artists -- notably Aerosmith -- have appeared on all three services in one week, Mr. Jackson will be the first to appear on all at the same time.
FEATURES
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 9, 1993
While the syndicated Soul Train Music Awards don't enjoy the popularity of the Grammys or the American Music Awards, this year they share a major attraction: Michael Jackson.Mr. Jackson's appearance at tonight's ceremony in Los Angeles -- he'll perform his hit "Remember the Time" -- is the latest stop in a publicity blitz that's included the other major music awards shows, the Super Bowl and his top-rated TV interview with Oprah Winfrey.But no matter what it does for Mr. Jackson, who is also receiving a Humanitarian of the Year award, his performance shines a welcome seventh-year spotlight on "Soul Train's" awards.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | December 25, 1993
Michael Jackson said Wednesday he is hoping for a speedy trial so he can clear his reputation of allegations he has molested young boys. If and when the entertainer gets his day in court, video voyeurs might be able to follow almost every minute of the proceedings.Steven Brill, chief executive officer and editor of Court TV, said his network "would seek to cover [a Jackson trial] if it happens."Court TV would be interested in either a criminal or civil trial. The civil trial brought on behalf of a 13-year-old boy is tentatively scheduled to start in March.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | September 16, 1993
Moscow--A Michael Jackson energetic and erotic as ever kept a cold, wet Moscow crowd clapping and dancing through two hours of sparkling fireworks and brilliant laser lights last night.Russians -- who came from all over the country and paid what for them is an enormous sum for tickets -- exulted in their good fortune."At last we have a show like this," said Vadim Artemyev, a 24-year-old soldier. "Now we're like the rest of the world.""We're thankful that he's come," said Oleg Lapin, 17, "and that he remembered us."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,HARTFORD COURANT | May 9, 2004
One of MTV's early slogans assured viewers that "too much is never enough." We know better now, of course - sometimes too much is quite enough, thank you. But when? It's a recurring question in celebrity journalism, where gossipy tidbits are a way of life. "Too much" is a judgment call, it seems, particularly in such situations as Michael Jackson's, where the usual vignettes about Hollywood foibles pale in comparison to the serious nature of the charges against him. The singer pleaded not guilty last month in a California courtroom to 10 counts related to the alleged molestation of an underage boy. It was Jackson's first court appearance since January, and developments in the case have been few between then and now. Yet the media attention has been constant since Jackson was arrested last November, with constant updates in the press.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1993
If you own a television set, chances are you have witnessed the sudden coming-out of Michael Jackson, a pop recluse whose once brilliant light seemed to be fading in America only a month ago.The enigmatic superstar, who was generating more press over his storied personal life than his music, has returned from a world tour to barn-burn America in a series of hard-to-miss performances -- from President Clinton's inauguration to the American Music Awards to...
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | September 22, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Pop superstar Michael Jackson will not face criminal child sex abuse charges, at least not for now, after three boys who alleged he molested them declined to testify in the case.Prosecutors said yesterday they would not bring formal charges against Mr. Jackson, mainly because his chief accuser, a 14-year-old boy, would not participate in the investigation.The decision was expected ever since Mr. Jackson settled a civil suit last year filed by the boy for an undisclosed amount, widely reported at between $15 million and $25 million.
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