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March 23, 2010
- Michael Jackson's doctor halted CPR on the dying pop star and delayed calling paramedics so he could collect drug vials at the scene, according to documents obtained by the Associated Press that shed new light on the singer's chaotic final moments. The explosive allegation that Dr. Conrad Murray might have tried to hide evidence is likely to be a focus as prosecutors move ahead with their involuntary-manslaughter case against him. The account was given to investigators by Alberto Alvarez, Jackson's logistics director, who was summoned to the stricken star's side as he was dying on June 25. His statement and those from two other Jackson employees also obtained by the AP paint a grisly scene in Jackson's bedroom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Apparently this going to be an all-Michael-Jackson night. Blergh. I expect to see way-too-many crotches being grabbed tonight. It'll probably take a crowbar to get Rudy's hand off his junk. On an editorial note, allow me to apologize for getting some of the All-Star dancers announced last week, and the week before, wrong. I write this recap pretty much live with the show airing. SYTYCD doesn't see fit to say or display the All-Star dancers surnames on the show, nor do they put the information on their website.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
In the middle of July 1992, Bill Clinton accepted the democratic nomination for president, the TV show "Melrose Place" premiered on Fox and America loved the following songs, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Just Another Day," Jon Secada Remember when Jon Secada was a thing? "Just Another Day," which has something of an easy-listening "Pure Moods" vibe, was his debut single. 9. "Wishing on a Star," The Cover Girls Listening to the 1992 version, it's tough to imagine the song as a slow ballad.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 19, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you were as surprised as I was to hear Michael Jackson charge the head of his record company with racism, perhaps the answer is in the stars. This revelation dawned on me while watching the new science-fiction comedy hit Men in Black II. One of the best gags in the movie is a surprise walk-on appearance by Mr. Jackson, who wants to join the "MIB" crimefighters as "Agent M" under an affirmative-action program for aliens. The big unspoken gag in the scene is that Mr. Jackson does not need any extra makeup to play an alien.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - On Christmas Day, it will be 20 years since Michael Jackson's Thriller album debuted on the pop charts. Twenty years since the rules changed, 20 years since the record book was rewritten, 20 years since the onset of a globe-straddling phenomenon. And 20 years since Michael Jackson disappeared. I know what you're saying. "What do you mean, disappeared? Didn't I just see him on television, dangling his baby over a balcony? Didn't I hear about him going to court wearing a surgical mask?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 23, 1992
On The Weekend Watch:ROCKIN' TONIGHT -- Does a new Michael Jackson video rate the cosmos-wide appeal implied by the hyperbolic announcement of a "planetary premiere?" Oh well, maybe people out on Venus really can catch the debut tonight of "In the Closet." The video, also featuring model Naomi Campbell, can be seen for the first time at 8:53 p.m. on three TV carriers: on Fox stations (Channel 45) toward the end of "Drexel's Class," and on both the MTV and BET cable services.The Jackson action is part of several pop-related developments on Fox, in fact.
FEATURES
By New York Times | March 21, 1991
IN WHAT MAY BE the most lucrative arrangement ever for a recording artist, Sony Corp. announced yesterday that Michael Jackson, the pop-music icon of the 1980s, had agreed to create feature films, theatrical shorts, television programming and a new record label for the Japanese conglomerate's American entertainment subsidiaries.Jackson, whose albums "Thriller" and "Bad" were the two biggest-selling records of the past decade, also agreed to extend by six albums his existing contract with Epic Records, a Sony subsidiary.
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | August 31, 1993
A FUNNY thing happened to Michael Jackson last week on the way to oblivion. Just when he seemed finished, another icon smashed, the darkness lifted a bit, at least until something new ++ comes out.You could see it in the pictures. Early in the week, TV illustrated the child-abuse allegations with footage showing the part of Mr. Jackson's act where he grabs his crotch.By the end of the week, those shots had been largely replaced by the familiar happy images of him with children and animals.
NEWS
By Mike Royko | February 10, 1993
Having seen every Fred Astaire movie, I'm qualified to say that not once did Fred Astaire grab his crotch. It's possible that he grabbed his crotch in the privacy of his home or dressing room. But that would be of no concern to the public.I mention this because Michael Jackson, the alleged super-duper star of show biz, has been described by many dance critics as being the Fred Astaire of his generation.While I'm no expert on dancing, I watched Jackson perform during half time of the Super Bowl, and I saw little that reminded me of Astaire, other than being skinny.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014
Prepare to be thrilled, Baltimore. The Michael Jackson The Immortal World Tour is coming to town. Mansour Abdessadok, 30, of Montpellier, France, is a part of the action, traveling the world as a mime, the main character in the Cirque du Soleil show, which stops at Baltimore Arena on March 18 and 19. "The show is Cirque du Soleil meets rock concert. It has the acrobatics that people know Cirque for, paired with the iconic music and choreography of Michael Jackson," said Abdessadok.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | November 20, 2012
Tonight is a tribute to Michael Jackson's "Bad" and the show starts with pros and the troupe performing to two of the album's "monster hits" - "Smooth Criminal" and "The Way You Make Me Feel. " I wish we were getting a "Thriller? tribute instead of a "Bad" tribute, but "Bad's" the one that's turning 25 and getting a Spike Lee-directed special on this same network later this week. We're calling the remaining couples "semi-finalists. " Whatever. The first round is going to be those weirdo made-up themes/styles and the second round is going to be the Michael Jackson music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Jonathan Phillip "Sugarfoot" Moffett can practically hear the King of Pop's voice in his head as he practices his drum licks for the Cirque du Soleil show based on the music of Michael Jackson. "Make it bigger than life," Moffett hears the Gloved One telling him, as he bears down on the beat in "Billie Jean" or "Heartbreak Hotel. " "My fans know my music. That's what they want to hear. Add some color, but don't stray too far. " In putting together "Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour," the creative team behind Cirque du Soleil drew upon the expertise of several musicians and dancers who worked closely with Jackson, including Moffett, Jackson's longtime drummer, and choreographer Travis Payne.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | November 10, 2011
Once upon a time, there was a boy who channeled the gods. He invoked them through his feet, moving without friction across the gleam of a thousand stages. They possessed him though his voice, now rough like bark, now sweet like butter and brimming always with an emotional depth once thought inaccessible to children. You felt the gods of soul and of show -- James, Jackie, Sammy -- moving through him when that first big record hit the streets late in 1969. The glissando splashes down into an urgency of guitar and a wriggling of bass and in comes the boy, moaning with real need about that girl he let get away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 14, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National  • This took 45 minutes to announce? Obama plans to cut $4 trillion from deficit over 12 years . (Political Wire)  • Can you blame him? Did Joe Biden sleep through the president's speech ? (ABC News)  • Days, not weeks: U.S. still bombing in Libya . (CBS News)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2010
- Michael Jackson's doctor halted CPR on the dying pop star and delayed calling paramedics so he could collect drug vials at the scene, according to documents obtained by the Associated Press that shed new light on the singer's chaotic final moments. The explosive allegation that Dr. Conrad Murray might have tried to hide evidence is likely to be a focus as prosecutors move ahead with their involuntary-manslaughter case against him. The account was given to investigators by Alberto Alvarez, Jackson's logistics director, who was summoned to the stricken star's side as he was dying on June 25. His statement and those from two other Jackson employees also obtained by the AP paint a grisly scene in Jackson's bedroom.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Michael Jackson, who ended his world tour last week and promptly dropped out of sight, is so addled by his addiction to pain killers that he is "barely able to function adequately on an intellectual level," one of his lawyers said yesterday.But Mr. Jackson's attorneys insisted that the entertainer is not fleeing allegations that he sexually molested a 13-year-old boy. They addedthat Mr. Jackson expects to return to the United States after he completes a six- to eight-week drug-treatment program at an undisclosed facility outside the country.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
Michael Jackson's accusers have spoken. The critics have waded in with their opinions. Now it's the kids' turn to speak out.And their opinion is worth hearing because kids will help determine whether Mr. Jackson, who on tonight's "The Jackson Family Honors" on NBC performs for the first time since being accused of molesting a child, will be yesterday's news or keep his superstar status.If the 30 or so fifth-graders in Renee Johnson's class at Baltimore County's Deer Park Elementary School are any measure, The Gloved One won't have much trouble getting on with his musical career.
NEWS
February 10, 2010
T here was never much doubt that the doctor who gave pop king Michael Jackson a powerful cocktail of narcotics and the anesthetic propofol in the hours before the singer died last July in a rented Los Angeles mansion eventually would be called to account. On Monday, Los Angeles police charged Dr. Conrad Murray, a cardiologist whom Mr. Jackson had hired as his personal physician in preparation for a hoped-for comeback tour in London, with involuntary manslaughter in the singer's death.
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