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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Attention, Anglophiles: How's this for a cast? Charlotte Rampling, Rufus Sewell, Michael Gambon, Michelle Dockery and Hayley Atwell? That's the lineup for "Restless," a two-night miniseries about World War II, betrayal and British spies that starts at 9 p.m. Friday on the Sundance Channel. Check out my review in the video above. And, yes, Dockery, who plays Rampling's daughter is indeed Lady Mary of "Downton Hall" fame. But where is Mr. Pamuk?  
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Attention, Anglophiles: How's this for a cast? Charlotte Rampling, Rufus Sewell, Michael Gambon, Michelle Dockery and Hayley Atwell? That's the lineup for "Restless," a two-night miniseries about World War II, betrayal and British spies that starts at 9 p.m. Friday on the Sundance Channel. Check out my review in the video above. And, yes, Dockery, who plays Rampling's daughter is indeed Lady Mary of "Downton Hall" fame. But where is Mr. Pamuk?  
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NEWS
By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Lesser mortals might have thrown in the towel, but not the hearty folks at New York's Roundabout Theater. Battered by a series of personnel disasters in its latest show, "A Thousand Clowns," the subscription theater still managed to put together a cast and a creative team. On Wednesday, 15 days late, the curtain went up on the revival of the Herb Gardner play. According to some audience members, the first preview came off without a hitch."It's been a wild few weeks," said Todd Haimes, the Roundabout's artistic director.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
A country being torn apart by revolution. A society in decay. A young woman on the brink of a sexual awakening. Rival suitors on opposite sides of the conflict, their only common ground the woman they both love. "The Last September" might sound like "Gone With the Wind," but that surface plot line is as far as the similarities go. Instead of a sweeping epic, this adaptation of a novel by Elizabeth Bowen is much quieter, a work perhaps too understated and stereotypical for its own good.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
A country being torn apart by revolution. A society in decay. A young woman on the brink of a sexual awakening. Rival suitors on opposite sides of the conflict, their only common ground the woman they both love. "The Last September" might sound like "Gone With the Wind," but that surface plot line is as far as the similarities go. Instead of a sweeping epic, this adaptation of a novel by Elizabeth Bowen is much quieter, a work perhaps too understated and stereotypical for its own good.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | December 19, 1992
MOVIEBarry Levinson's 'Toys'"Toys" wants to be innocent and resonant, like a great fairy tale, but it's too slow-moving and self-indulgent. Still, the Barry Levinson film is so beautifully designed and so full of astonishing vistas that a visually savvy moviegoer has to add it to the must-see list. It's set in a kind of child's imagination, full of primary colors and images of lurid purity; everything is what it is, without nuance or subtext. A muted Robin Williams plays a boy-man who must fight with his evil militaristic uncle (Michael Gambon)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | July 26, 1991
One of the most admirable things about "The Godfather" was its understatement -- a raised eyebrow from Marlon Brando; a clever, almost imperceptible camera movement from Francis Ford Coppola.No one connected with "Mobsters" seems to appreciate that fact. The quartet of young stars -- Christian Slater, Patrick Dempsey, Richard Grieco, Costas Mandylor -- as well as veterans Anthony Quinn, F. Murray Abraham and Michael Gambon -- avoid any semblance of subtlety. Director Michael Karbelnikoff and composer Michael Small seem downright allergic to anything softer than overstatement.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 22, 2006
There's a great, taut, jet-black satire hidden at the center of The Good Shepherd, Robert De Niro's anemic epic about the founding of the Office of Strategic Services before the Second World War and the OSS' postwar transformation into the Central Intelligence Agency. The government and military gamble that men with old school backgrounds will have a deeper emotional investment in their country and fewer conflicts about protecting it than more recent immigrants. They want the reliability of a rock-ribbed bank.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 23, 2007
Amazing Grace, a worshipful film biography of British abolitionist William Wilberforce, uses his quest to outlaw slavery to attack the complacency that allows the practice to persist today as child prostitution or forced labor. But the movie is so reverent that it registers as little more than a pageant of outrage and uplift. Another hymn or two and it might turn into a musical along the lines of Les Miserables. In the course of the film's plush, well-paced two hours, the English anti-slavery movement ebbs when international tensions in general and the French Revolution in particular engender paranoia about any kind of protest.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 19, 1999
Blood flows prodigiously, spurts spontaneously and puddles luxuriously in "Sleepy Hollow," Tim Burton's very loose adaptation of the Washington Irving story, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." As usual, Burton has his finger right on the pulse of audiences looking for frightening flights of fancy, creating a wonderfully atmospheric world that is gloomily enchanted with murderous spirits, vengeful ghosts and supernatural dervishes of destruction.Which makes it all the more disappointing when Burton -- who, after all, brought us the first two "Batman" movies as well as the morbidly visionary "Edward Scissorhands" -- nudges the entire enterprise over the top with googly-eyed skeletons, a megaplex-friendly action sequence set in a windmill and way, way too many rolling-head shots.
NEWS
By Peter Marks and Peter Marks,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Lesser mortals might have thrown in the towel, but not the hearty folks at New York's Roundabout Theater. Battered by a series of personnel disasters in its latest show, "A Thousand Clowns," the subscription theater still managed to put together a cast and a creative team. On Wednesday, 15 days late, the curtain went up on the revival of the Herb Gardner play. According to some audience members, the first preview came off without a hitch."It's been a wild few weeks," said Todd Haimes, the Roundabout's artistic director.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | December 19, 1992
MOVIEBarry Levinson's 'Toys'"Toys" wants to be innocent and resonant, like a great fairy tale, but it's too slow-moving and self-indulgent. Still, the Barry Levinson film is so beautifully designed and so full of astonishing vistas that a visually savvy moviegoer has to add it to the must-see list. It's set in a kind of child's imagination, full of primary colors and images of lurid purity; everything is what it is, without nuance or subtext. A muted Robin Williams plays a boy-man who must fight with his evil militaristic uncle (Michael Gambon)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | July 26, 1991
One of the most admirable things about "The Godfather" was its understatement -- a raised eyebrow from Marlon Brando; a clever, almost imperceptible camera movement from Francis Ford Coppola.No one connected with "Mobsters" seems to appreciate that fact. The quartet of young stars -- Christian Slater, Patrick Dempsey, Richard Grieco, Costas Mandylor -- as well as veterans Anthony Quinn, F. Murray Abraham and Michael Gambon -- avoid any semblance of subtlety. Director Michael Karbelnikoff and composer Michael Small seem downright allergic to anything softer than overstatement.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 5, 1999
If ever a play didn't want to be opened up, it is "Dancing at Lughnasa," Brian Friel's extraordinary exploration of the power of ancestry, ritual and primal release that became a hit on Broadway in 1991.On stage, much of the story's power derives from its claustrophobic context, the binds of which are finally burst in a paroxysm of energy and almost erotic celebration. We see the climax on screen, but with none of the stifling build-up, which makes the movie version a tame, if well-acted, domestic drama.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 28, 1990
It's not surprising that Harold Pinter discovered Elizabeth Bowen's novel "The Heat of the Day," as it's a perfect setting for one of the playwright's excursions into the meaning of the language that forms the primary substance of a relationship.What is surprising is that Alfred Hitchcock never made a film of this tense psychological drama which Bowen published in 1949.Adapted by Pinter for the small screen, this two-hour movie made by England's Granada Television kicks of the 20th season of Masterpiece Theatre Sunday night at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.It's 1941 in London.
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