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Michael Flatley

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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- A man who builds a show around himself and calls it "Lord of the Dance" is not shy.But what's surprising about Michael Flatley, who comes off as arrogant and obnoxious in even the most sycophantic magazine profiles, is how self-effacing he manages to be in the midst of all the hype.On the best-selling video of "Lord of the Dance" and in the show itself, which will play Aug. 30-31 at the Baltimore Arena, Flatley is larger than life: erupting onstage in a firestorm of steps, strutting off to thunderous applause, returning with an unfeigned smile of joy to bask in the applause.
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By LORI SEARS | November 20, 2005
Michael Flatley, star and choreographer of Lord of the Dance, Riverdance and Feet of Flames, is back on tour, kicking up his heels in a new production, Celtic Tiger. The show, which comes to the Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., on Saturday, tells of the struggles and triumphs of the Irish people. Through music, dancing and colorful imagery, Flatley - the show's creator - and his cast of 60 dancers present the spectacle, which is part stage show and part feature film. The performance will be at 8 p.m. at the Patriot Center, 4500 Patriot Circle.
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By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | May 27, 1997
Michael Flatley wants to set the record straight. He has never been, nor ever claimed to be, a computer-carrying member of Mensa, the club for modest folks with staggering IQs. In fact, he doesn't know how that particular myth got started and seems to think you have to be an idiot to believe such blarney."
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 27, 1998
It's going to be an all-singing, all-dancing season for Performing Arts Productions at the Lyric Opera House in 1998-1999."At the Lyric, musicals are very much the most popular format," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts, in announcing the four-show subscription season. On the schedule are "Jolson -- The Musical," "Steel City," "Fame -- The Musical" and "Lord of the Dance."The lineup has one less show than the Lyric's recent subscription seasons. Litrenta cited several reasons for the decrease, including a desire to make the subscription more affordable.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | November 20, 2005
Michael Flatley, star and choreographer of Lord of the Dance, Riverdance and Feet of Flames, is back on tour, kicking up his heels in a new production, Celtic Tiger. The show, which comes to the Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., on Saturday, tells of the struggles and triumphs of the Irish people. Through music, dancing and colorful imagery, Flatley - the show's creator - and his cast of 60 dancers present the spectacle, which is part stage show and part feature film. The performance will be at 8 p.m. at the Patriot Center, 4500 Patriot Circle.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1997
The anonymous artist who designed the Celtic knot back in the eighth century must be kicking himself for not taking out a copyright on the design. He could have made a fortune just on "Lord of the Dance," where it decorates everything from banners to T-shirts.The person making the fortune, however, is Michael Flatley, the phenomenal Irish-American step-dancer and tapper, who portrays (who is?) the title character in the show. It played twice this weekend, to full but not packed houses, at the Baltimore Arena.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1997
Because of an editing error, a quotation was misattributed in yesterday's Today section article on Trinity, an Irish step-dancing troupe. The quote -- "I just want people to know that Trinity is not a knee-jerk reaction to 'River-dance' " -- should have been attributed to Mark Howard.The Sun regrets the errors."We don't really care, and we're past all this," says Mark Howard, by way of introduction, though it becomes clear that they do really care and they're not past all this.Howard, artistic director of Trinity Irish Dance Company in Chicago, is the creator of what he calls "progressive Irish dancing": a mixture of Irish step-dance, American tap and modern dance, finished with stories, costumes and stage lighting.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 27, 1998
It's going to be an all-singing, all-dancing season for Performing Arts Productions at the Lyric Opera House in 1998-1999."At the Lyric, musicals are very much the most popular format," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts, in announcing the four-show subscription season. On the schedule are "Jolson -- The Musical," "Steel City," "Fame -- The Musical" and "Lord of the Dance."The lineup has one less show than the Lyric's recent subscription seasons. Litrenta cited several reasons for the decrease, including a desire to make the subscription more affordable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2007
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BABE CELEBRATION Celebrate the 112th birthday of baseball great and Baltimore's own George Herman "Babe" Ruth at Babe's Birthday Bash tomorrow at Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards. Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts and other former Orioles, including Scott McGregor, Joe Orsulak, Ken Singleton, Al Bumbry, Dave Johnson and Dick Hall, as well as super fan "Wild" Bill Hagy, are scheduled to appear. In addition to food, beer and tours of Geppi's Entertainment Museum, Babe's Birthday Bash will include the presentation of the inaugural Babe Ruth Community Service Award to Ravens guard Edwin Mulitalo in recognition of his work with Big Ed's Band Foundation, which provides musical support for Baltimore-area schools.
FEATURES
November 20, 2007
Khartoum's newfound oil wealth set the stage for conflict with the long-neglected region of Darfur in western Sudan, where rebel groups emerged to claim a share of the country's burgeoning wealth. In response, the Sudanese government armed a proxy militia and unleashed the so-called "Devils on Horseback" on the rebels and civilian farmers in a stampede of brutality. Over the past four years, at least 200,000 people have been killed, 2.5 million driven from their homes, and mass rapes have been used as a weapon of war. Now PBS' Frontline asks why the international community and the United Nations has failed to stop the slaughter, in the documentary On Our Watch.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 1997
The anonymous artist who designed the Celtic knot back in the eighth century must be kicking himself for not taking out a copyright on the design. He could have made a fortune just on "Lord of the Dance," where it decorates everything from banners to T-shirts.The person making the fortune, however, is Michael Flatley, the phenomenal Irish-American step-dancer and tapper, who portrays (who is?) the title character in the show. It played twice this weekend, to full but not packed houses, at the Baltimore Arena.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 1997
Because of an editing error, a quotation was misattributed in yesterday's Today section article on Trinity, an Irish step-dancing troupe. The quote -- "I just want people to know that Trinity is not a knee-jerk reaction to 'River-dance' " -- should have been attributed to Mark Howard.The Sun regrets the errors."We don't really care, and we're past all this," says Mark Howard, by way of introduction, though it becomes clear that they do really care and they're not past all this.Howard, artistic director of Trinity Irish Dance Company in Chicago, is the creator of what he calls "progressive Irish dancing": a mixture of Irish step-dance, American tap and modern dance, finished with stories, costumes and stage lighting.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- A man who builds a show around himself and calls it "Lord of the Dance" is not shy.But what's surprising about Michael Flatley, who comes off as arrogant and obnoxious in even the most sycophantic magazine profiles, is how self-effacing he manages to be in the midst of all the hype.On the best-selling video of "Lord of the Dance" and in the show itself, which will play Aug. 30-31 at the Baltimore Arena, Flatley is larger than life: erupting onstage in a firestorm of steps, strutting off to thunderous applause, returning with an unfeigned smile of joy to bask in the applause.
FEATURES
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | May 27, 1997
Michael Flatley wants to set the record straight. He has never been, nor ever claimed to be, a computer-carrying member of Mensa, the club for modest folks with staggering IQs. In fact, he doesn't know how that particular myth got started and seems to think you have to be an idiot to believe such blarney."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1997
It may seem a little warm for March, but there's still plenty of ice on the tube. Check out CBS tonight."Michael Flatley: Lord of the Dance" (7 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- "River-dance" star Flatley performs in his own Irish dance-and-music spectacular. (Times are approximate; remember, it's pledge time.) PBS."Star Trek: Voyager" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Capt. Janeway and the gang finally make it back to Earth; only problem is, it's 20th-century Earth, where they have to prevent an egotistical jerk of a computer genius from tampering with the future and ending life as everyone's come to know it. If you saw this two-parter when it aired in November, you know whether the world survives.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
Thomas Kelly, 72, the engineer who oversaw the design and construction of the spacecraft that landed Apollo astronauts on the moon, died Saturday in New York after being ill with pulmonary fibrosis for six years. An engineer with Grumman Aircraft Corp., Mr. Kelly led a team that built the spacecraft that took astronauts to the moon July 20, 1969, and returned them to Earth. His work led to the creation of the Lunar Excursion Module, a two-stage spacecraft that could take two astronauts to the moon's surface while a third crew member stayed in orbit around the moon in the command module, which would later return them to Earth.
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