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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
Of all of the people who have had their pocketbooks fattened by the go-go economy of the 1990s, almost no one has made out better than Michael Dell.Dell, the founder, chairman, chief executive officer, namesake and house deity of Dell Computer Corp., is widely considered the fourth-richest person in the United States, with an overall wealth of $13 billion.In a hypercharged age when multibillion-dollar sums litter the business pages like ticker-tape confetti, it's worth pausing a moment to reflect on the fact that one man could have $13 billion to his name.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Serevices | June 3, 2007
Eras don't last long anymore. Take the era of direct sales of computers, for example. It was fun while it lasted, especially for entrepreneur Michael Dell. It spawned a notable case study in corporate innovation that was extolled in business school pulpits worldwide. Lectures, essays and test questions were built upon it, while competitors scurried to emulate it. Popular culture adopted it. From 2001 through early 2003, Steven the Dell dude was a phenomenon on commercial airwaves, proclaiming his catchphrase: "Hey, dude, you're getting a Dell!"
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 10, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - Morton Topfer, the second-largest shareholder on Dell Computer Corp.'s board, has sold most of his 4.27 million shares in the company, according to a regulatory filing. Topfer sold about 4.22 million shares from June 1 to June 11 for about $107.5 million at prices ranging from $25 to $25.71 a share. He owned about 53,000 shares as of June 30, according to the filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Dell founder and Chairman Michael Dell hired Topfer as vice chairman in 1994.
BUSINESS
By CHRIS GAITHER and CHRIS GAITHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
Dell Inc. Chairman Michael Dell vowed yesterday to "do better" after the world's biggest personal computer maker posted second-quarter earnings that fell by about half amid a bruising price war with rival Hewlett-Packard Co. The company also disclosed an informal Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into its accounting - deepening worries that the tech industry juggernaut might be stalling. As the company slashed prices to spur sales, some customers have complained that Dell also cut back on customer service.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Serevices | June 3, 2007
Eras don't last long anymore. Take the era of direct sales of computers, for example. It was fun while it lasted, especially for entrepreneur Michael Dell. It spawned a notable case study in corporate innovation that was extolled in business school pulpits worldwide. Lectures, essays and test questions were built upon it, while competitors scurried to emulate it. Popular culture adopted it. From 2001 through early 2003, Steven the Dell dude was a phenomenon on commercial airwaves, proclaiming his catchphrase: "Hey, dude, you're getting a Dell!"
BUSINESS
By CHRIS GAITHER and CHRIS GAITHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
Dell Inc. Chairman Michael Dell vowed yesterday to "do better" after the world's biggest personal computer maker posted second-quarter earnings that fell by about half amid a bruising price war with rival Hewlett-Packard Co. The company also disclosed an informal Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into its accounting - deepening worries that the tech industry juggernaut might be stalling. As the company slashed prices to spur sales, some customers have complained that Dell also cut back on customer service.
BUSINESS
By Tom Steinert-Threlkeld and Tom Steinert-Threlkeld,Dallas Morning News | November 18, 1991
DALLAS -- When Rod Canion, co-founder and president, was shown the door at Compaq Computer Corp. a few weeks ago, the era of entrepreneurial exuberance in the personal computer industry ended abruptly.The young industry has grown up with stunning swiftness. Its focus has changed: While fortunes were once built on getting great ideas to market, they now rest on the efficiency with which small advances can be marketed at low cost to the widest audience.And some say the game has gotten ruthless.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 4, 1993
The second day of Bill Clinton's economic summit coincided with IBM's latest admission of woeful performance: bye-bye to another 25,000 jobs, a $6 billion, one-time charge to earnings and a $1 billion reduction in the product- development budget. Clinton, hinting at a willingness to jawbone his way into microeconomic decisions, bemoaned the product-development cut.Whoa, Bill.Had I been charged with drafting Clinton's statement about IBM (assuming cause for a statement -- a shaky assumption)
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Michael S. Dell, the wunderkind computer executive, toured wired classrooms with high-tech plasma screens and blinking stock market tickers at the spanking new $38 million wing of the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park before delivering a speech there yesterday. But what really raised the eyebrows of the man Time magazine and CNN called one of the 25 most influential global executives was when the dean, Howard Frank, revealed that the school installed electrical outlets in lockers - so students can recharge their laptops during lunch.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
With a shareholder vote just days away, T. Rowe Price, one of Dell Inc.'s major investors, reaffirmed its opposition to a $24.4 billion buyout offer for the personal computer manufacturer. "We continue to believe the proposed buyout does not reflect the value of Dell and we do not intend to support the offer as put forward," Brian Rogers, Price chairman and chief investment officer, said in a statement Monday. The Baltimore-based money manager owned 71.8 million shares, or 4.03 percent of Dell, at the end of March, Morningstar reports.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Michael S. Dell, the wunderkind computer executive, toured wired classrooms with high-tech plasma screens and blinking stock market tickers at the spanking new $38 million wing of the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, College Park before delivering a speech there yesterday. But what really raised the eyebrows of the man Time magazine and CNN called one of the 25 most influential global executives was when the dean, Howard Frank, revealed that the school installed electrical outlets in lockers - so students can recharge their laptops during lunch.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 10, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - Morton Topfer, the second-largest shareholder on Dell Computer Corp.'s board, has sold most of his 4.27 million shares in the company, according to a regulatory filing. Topfer sold about 4.22 million shares from June 1 to June 11 for about $107.5 million at prices ranging from $25 to $25.71 a share. He owned about 53,000 shares as of June 30, according to the filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Dell founder and Chairman Michael Dell hired Topfer as vice chairman in 1994.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
Of all of the people who have had their pocketbooks fattened by the go-go economy of the 1990s, almost no one has made out better than Michael Dell.Dell, the founder, chairman, chief executive officer, namesake and house deity of Dell Computer Corp., is widely considered the fourth-richest person in the United States, with an overall wealth of $13 billion.In a hypercharged age when multibillion-dollar sums litter the business pages like ticker-tape confetti, it's worth pausing a moment to reflect on the fact that one man could have $13 billion to his name.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | January 4, 1993
The second day of Bill Clinton's economic summit coincided with IBM's latest admission of woeful performance: bye-bye to another 25,000 jobs, a $6 billion, one-time charge to earnings and a $1 billion reduction in the product- development budget. Clinton, hinting at a willingness to jawbone his way into microeconomic decisions, bemoaned the product-development cut.Whoa, Bill.Had I been charged with drafting Clinton's statement about IBM (assuming cause for a statement -- a shaky assumption)
BUSINESS
By Tom Steinert-Threlkeld and Tom Steinert-Threlkeld,Dallas Morning News | November 18, 1991
DALLAS -- When Rod Canion, co-founder and president, was shown the door at Compaq Computer Corp. a few weeks ago, the era of entrepreneurial exuberance in the personal computer industry ended abruptly.The young industry has grown up with stunning swiftness. Its focus has changed: While fortunes were once built on getting great ideas to market, they now rest on the efficiency with which small advances can be marketed at low cost to the widest audience.And some say the game has gotten ruthless.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 23, 1999
DETROIT -- AutoNation Inc., the world's largest automotive retailer, introduced a new online buying service yesterday to capture part of a market forecast to explode from 15,000 vehicle sales this year to 500,000 in 2003.AutoNationDirect.com is now available in the Tampa, Fla., area. Customers can reserve a vehicle for a test drive, withdraw money from their bank for a deposit and complete loan applications online. A nearby dealer would then deliver the vehicle to the customer's home.AutoNation expects to generate $750 million in online sales this year, then double that in each of the next two years, said Steven Berrard, AutoNation's co-chief executive officer with Wayne Huizenga.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 15, 2004
LAS VEGAS - This is the year, technology executives believe, that the personal computer takes over the living room. Last week at the Consumer Electronics Show, the world's biggest technology convention, top industry leaders said computers are becoming cheap and user-friendly enough for most households to manage. Add to that the fact that most music and video is digital. Executives believe that those trends have made computers better able to entertain consumers than traditional machines such as televisions and hi-fi speaker systems.
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