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Tricia Bishop | May 16, 2012
A Baltimore police sergeant was suspended and criminally charged with perjury and misconduct after a months-long investigation into allegations he used false information to obtain a search and seizure warrant. Sgt. Dennis W. Workley, who's been on the force since 1996 assigned to the Eastern District, was charged Wednesday by the Baltimore state's attorney's office via criminal information. No details were immediately available. Police union lawyer Michael Davey, who expects to represent Workley, said Wednesday afternoon that he  hadn't yet seen the charging documents and couldn't comment.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Baltimore County prosecutors will not be allowed to use information provided by James D. Laboard's lawyer on the night that the off-duty police officer allegedly killed a Randallstown teenager, a judge ruled Friday. During a criminal motions hearing, Circuit Judge Jan Marshall Alexander ruled that the lawyer's decision to talk to detectives violated attorney-client confidentiality. Prosecutors said the ruling would have little effect on the case. Laboard, a Baltimore County police officer, is charged with two counts of manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
The Baltimore police officer who was caught on video berating and pushing a 14-year-old skateboarder at the Inner Harbor three years ago has been cleared of the most serious administrative charges, a police union leader said Tuesday. A three-member police panel called a trial board held a hearing last week and found Officer Salvatore Rivieri guilty of failing to issue the youth a citizen contact receipt and file a report but not guilty on charges of using excessive and unnecessary force and uttering a discourtesy.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Kevin Rector and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
An off-duty Baltimore County police officer chased down a 17-year-old Randallstown High School student and killed him during an altercation Wednesday night, police said, after a group of youths threw a rock at the front door of the officer's home. The killing of Christopher Brown of the 3900 block of Carthage Road has been ruled by the state medical examiner as a homicide by asphyxiation. No charges have been filed against the officer, James D. LaBoard, though the investigation continues.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Baltimore County prosecutors will not be allowed to use information provided by James D. Laboard's lawyer on the night that the off-duty police officer allegedly killed a Randallstown teenager, a judge ruled Friday. During a criminal motions hearing, Circuit Judge Jan Marshall Alexander ruled that the lawyer's decision to talk to detectives violated attorney-client confidentiality. Prosecutors said the ruling would have little effect on the case. Laboard, a Baltimore County police officer, is charged with two counts of manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 2, 2009
Attorneys who represent Baltimore police officers at disciplinary hearings say their clients are being treated unfairly because the department's top lawyer is prosecuting cases while simultaneously advising the independent panel judging the accused. At a hearing last week, the lawyer for a city officer found guilty of assault said the Police Department's legal affairs chief, Mark Grimes, repeatedly helped the hearing's chairman rule on defense motions during a proceeding called a trial board.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Kevin Rector and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
An off-duty Baltimore County police officer chased down a 17-year-old Randallstown High School student and killed him during an altercation Wednesday night, police said, after a group of youths threw a rock at the front door of the officer's home. The killing of Christopher Brown of the 3900 block of Carthage Road has been ruled by the state medical examiner as a homicide by asphyxiation. No charges have been filed against the officer, James D. LaBoard, though the investigation continues.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
An independent panel created to review last year's in-custody death of Tyrone West determined that Baltimore police officers did not use excessive force but made tactical errors that "potentially aggravated the situation" and did not follow basic policies. West, 44, died on July 18, 2013, after police and witnesses said he fought with officers after being pulled over while driving through Northeast Baltimore. West's family has maintained that, based on accounts from witnesses, he was beaten to death by the officers, though an autopsy determined he died because of a heart condition exacerbated by the struggle with police and the summer heat.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Baltimore police were legally justified in using their fists, batons and pepper spray to subdue Tyrone West before he died while resisting arrest this summer, State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said Thursday. The officers involved in the case used "objectively reasonable force" and will not face charges, Bernstein said. The announcement concludes the criminal investigation in a case that began with a traffic stop and became the focus of increasing public pressure amid angry protests by West's family.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
In Anne ArundelSubcommittee splits evenly on telemarketing billANNAPOLIS -- A legislative subcommittee split evenly yesterday on a proposal that would make it easier for Marylanders to cut down on the volume of telephone calls from telemarketers.Despite the 2-2 vote on whether to approve the bill, the subcommittee agreed that it should be introduced in January for consideration by the full Senate Finance Committee.The proposed legislation would create a state computer list of people who do not want to be called at home.
NEWS
Tricia Bishop | May 16, 2012
A Baltimore police sergeant was suspended and criminally charged with perjury and misconduct after a months-long investigation into allegations he used false information to obtain a search and seizure warrant. Sgt. Dennis W. Workley, who's been on the force since 1996 assigned to the Eastern District, was charged Wednesday by the Baltimore state's attorney's office via criminal information. No details were immediately available. Police union lawyer Michael Davey, who expects to represent Workley, said Wednesday afternoon that he  hadn't yet seen the charging documents and couldn't comment.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
The Baltimore police officer who was caught on video berating and pushing a 14-year-old skateboarder at the Inner Harbor three years ago has been cleared of the most serious administrative charges, a police union leader said Tuesday. A three-member police panel called a trial board held a hearing last week and found Officer Salvatore Rivieri guilty of failing to issue the youth a citizen contact receipt and file a report but not guilty on charges of using excessive and unnecessary force and uttering a discourtesy.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 2, 2009
Attorneys who represent Baltimore police officers at disciplinary hearings say their clients are being treated unfairly because the department's top lawyer is prosecuting cases while simultaneously advising the independent panel judging the accused. At a hearing last week, the lawyer for a city officer found guilty of assault said the Police Department's legal affairs chief, Mark Grimes, repeatedly helped the hearing's chairman rule on defense motions during a proceeding called a trial board.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
A Baltimore police sergeant was found innocent yesterday of sexually harassing several officers under his command after a four-day administrative hearing peppered with graphic testimony. A panel of three police officials -- a sergeant, a lieutenant and a major -- deliberated for four hours before clearing Sgt. Robert Richards on all counts, enabling him to return to street duty. "He's a happy man," said his lawyer, Michael Davey, who works for the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 3. Of the department's case against his client, Davey said: "There was nothing there."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
A Baltimore police sergeant -- whose 3-year-old racial discrimination suit against the agency is pending -- has been charged administratively with sexual harassment by the department's internal investigators. Lawyers representing Sgt. Robert Richards said they were served with the papers on Tuesday. Attorney Michael Davey would only confirm that his client has been charged; police sources said the 20 counts include harassment. "I have to review a 6-inch file," Davey said yesterday. "I won't comment on anything."
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