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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 12, 1992
Washington MICHAEL CRICHTON is so low-key, so laconic, that he casay almost anything and seem eminently reasonable.So when asked if he truly believes the Japanese are "the most racist people on the planet," as one character observes in Mr. Crichton's new and very controversial thriller, he sounds as if he can't understand why one might be offended."
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Climb the stairs to Gregory Paul's third-floor Charles Village apartment and you may quickly find yourself slipping back 100 million years or more into the Mesozoic era. The Baltimore artist's walls are filled with lush portraits of dinosaurian wildlife in action, many in color. Tyrannosaurs step off across mud flats on a sunset hunt. A pair of feathered Archaeopteryx cavort like gulls at the surf line of an ancient beach. The dynamic scenes are part of his work for the new Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs — but Paul, 56, a self-taught paleontologist, full-time illustrator, author and dino-consultant to TV, museums and the movies, is no newcomer.
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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 12, 1992
Washington -- Michael Crichton is so low-key, so laconic, that he can say almost anything and seem eminently reasonable.So when asked if he truly believes the Japanese are "the most racist people on the planet," as one character observes in Mr. Crichton's new and very controversial thriller, he sounds as if he can't understand why one might be offended."
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By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,Los Angeles Times | November 6, 2008
LOS ANGELES - Michael Crichton, the doctor-turned-author of best-selling thrillers such as The Terminal Man and Jurassic Park and a Hollywood writer and director whose credits include Westworld and Coma, has died. He was 66. Dr. Crichton died in Los Angeles on Tuesday "after a courageous and private battle against cancer," his family said in a statement. For nearly four decades, the 6-foot-9 writer was a towering presence in the worlds of publishing and filmmaking. "There was no one like Crichton, because he could both entertain and educate," Lynn Nesbit, Dr. Crichton's agent since the late 1960s, told the Los Angeles Times yesterday.
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By Bettijane Levine and Bettijane Levine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- Michael Crichton turns out to be as oddly compelling in person as his weird creatures are on paper. Crichton's the father of the techno-thriller, the guy who dreamed up cloned dinos roaming Jurassic Park and more than a dozen other best-selling books of futuristic fiction loosely based on scientific facts. Now he's come up with Prey, yet another tale of technology gone amok, featuring a monster you wouldn't want to reckon with. This one is actually a swarm of nano-particles -- each less than half the thickness of a human hair -- teensy machines with cameras built in. They have the ability to reproduce and evolve independent of the humans who created them.
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 1996
HOLLYWOOD -- The eye-popping rise in star salaries is not the only thing driving up the cost of movies these days.Last week, Warner Bros. shelled out a whopping $8 million for the latest John Grisham best seller, "The Runaway Jury."The sale may be an aberration, yet it points up the industry's ferocious appetite for hot literary material, particularly by such brand name authors as Grisham, Michael Crichton and Tom Clancy.Given Grisham's marquee value, agents weren't surprised by the kind of money his new novel fetched.
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By ELIZABETH TEACHOUT and ELIZABETH TEACHOUT,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 1996
"Airframe," by Michael Crichton. Knopf. 368 pages. $26.How do you know when Michael Crichton has turned out one of his best novels? When you're afraid that reading it will ruin the movie for you.At his best, Crichton has turned out stuff from "Jurassic Park" to "ER" that has proven compulsively screenworthy. Add "Airframe," his new novel about the airline industry, to this list. It's a one-sitting read that will cause a lifetime of white-knuckled nightmares - and this in spite of the slipshod quality of the writing.
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By GERRI KOBREN In a Child's Name: the Legacy of a Mother's Murder. Peter Maas. Simon & Schuster. 378 pages. $19.95 | November 25, 1990
Jurassic Park.Michael Crichton.Knopf.228 pages. $19.95. Accepting the basic premise is easier than it might seem: An eccentric industrialist has engaged a brilliant geneticist, an unconventional mathematician, a computer wizard, a paleontologist, a zoo keeper and a veterinarian to clone dinosaurs and keep them on a private Costa Rican island, where they are to be the attractions in an amusement park for very rich children.Michael Crichton has got so much of this right -- the science, the ethical dilemmas, the no-larger-than life-sized characters -- that the story flows seamlessly between fact and fiction; for the moment, at least, the DNA manipulation, the computerized systems, even the tyrannosaurus rex are plausible.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 10, 1993
When Steven Spielberg mutters, "Leapin' Lizards!" he isn' kidding around.Thus his much anticipated version of Michael Crichton's"Jurassic Park" is a festival of leaping lizards -- and cavorting, cartwheeling, gamboling, strutting, bounding and tumbling lizards, which gets exactly at the movie's signal triumph and its primary drawing card: You will believe that they are back. And that they brought their teeth.Will you believe anything else?That's a more difficult question to answer. The set-up is just chilling enough, a variation on a theme Michael Crichton worked earlier in his film "Westworld," about a high-tech amusement park that turned lethal for its customers.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | March 9, 1992
It's Kafkaesque. The shrill voices of Michael Crichton (author of the crude "Rising Sun") and presidential hopefuls Pat Buchanan and Bob Kerrey claim we're on the ropes. Raise high the walls around Fortress America. And all this just one year after the Persian Gulf war, three months after the Soviet Union disintegrated.The recession lingers. The K-12 educational system shows few signs of life. Our infrastructure crumbles. Etc.Still, our grocery store shelves groan with an average of 30,000 items, up from 9,000 in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 9, 2005
Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed By Jared Diamond. Viking. 575 pages. $29.95 In his best-selling book Guns, Germs and Steel, Jared Diamond argued that European cultures came to dominate the globe because of a series of geographic and historical accidents that left other societies less able to withstand famine and disease. And although the book was filled with tales of warfare and plagues, overall it had a sensible and welcome message: that the West shouldn't regard itself as superior, or invulnerable, because of its current affluence and political dominance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dick Adler and Dick Adler,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2004
Chicago lawyer and political insider David Ellis certainly knows how to plot up a storm. As he did in Line of Vision (which won him an Edgar for best first mystery) and Life Sentence, he powers his latest legal thriller, Jury of One (Putnam Publishing Group, 384 pages, $24.95), with a narrative engine that smashes through the barriers of coincidence and credulity, leaving readers breathless at the author's audacity. Not only is Shelly Trotter -- a 35-year-old lawyer working for a nonprofit firm as an advocate for children in trouble -- the daughter of the current, conservative governor of the novel's unspecified state, but she also turns out to be the birth mother of a 17-year-old boy charged with killing a police officer.
FEATURES
By Bettijane Levine and Bettijane Levine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- Michael Crichton turns out to be as oddly compelling in person as his weird creatures are on paper. Crichton's the father of the techno-thriller, the guy who dreamed up cloned dinos roaming Jurassic Park and more than a dozen other best-selling books of futuristic fiction loosely based on scientific facts. Now he's come up with Prey, yet another tale of technology gone amok, featuring a monster you wouldn't want to reckon with. This one is actually a swarm of nano-particles -- each less than half the thickness of a human hair -- teensy machines with cameras built in. They have the ability to reproduce and evolve independent of the humans who created them.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH TEACHOUT and ELIZABETH TEACHOUT,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 1996
"Airframe," by Michael Crichton. Knopf. 368 pages. $26.How do you know when Michael Crichton has turned out one of his best novels? When you're afraid that reading it will ruin the movie for you.At his best, Crichton has turned out stuff from "Jurassic Park" to "ER" that has proven compulsively screenworthy. Add "Airframe," his new novel about the airline industry, to this list. It's a one-sitting read that will cause a lifetime of white-knuckled nightmares - and this in spite of the slipshod quality of the writing.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 1996
HOLLYWOOD -- The eye-popping rise in star salaries is not the only thing driving up the cost of movies these days.Last week, Warner Bros. shelled out a whopping $8 million for the latest John Grisham best seller, "The Runaway Jury."The sale may be an aberration, yet it points up the industry's ferocious appetite for hot literary material, particularly by such brand name authors as Grisham, Michael Crichton and Tom Clancy.Given Grisham's marquee value, agents weren't surprised by the kind of money his new novel fetched.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | June 25, 1995
If Indiana Jones were a movie producer, he'd probably be Kathleen Kennedy.Not only did Ms. Kennedy -- a co-founder of Amblin Entertainment with Steven Spielberg and her husband, Frank Marshall -- have a hand in producing the three Indy adventures, she has overseen most of Mr. Spielberg's greatest hits, including "Jurassic Park," "E.T." and "Schindler's List."Now, with Ms. Kennedy and Mr. Marshall's own new company hitting it big with "Congo" and Ms. Kennedy's Amblin production The Bridges of Madison County" earning respectable reviews, the producer who long ago established herself at the top of her profession has hit yet another career peak."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 13, 1994
Boston. -- It is the story that made strong men cross their legs and strong women giggle about strong men crossing their legs.It was the story that made strong headline writers give in to their weakness for puns.And more to the point, it was the story that made my husband glance up from the newspaper and say, for the only time in our recorded history, ''You could give this a good leaving-alone.''Which is, Lord knows, what I intended to do.One case of male genital mutilation in 200-odd years of American history?
BUSINESS
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
Computers have changed the way we work, the way we access information and the way we write.But computers haven't changed the way we read. At least not yet.Computers churn out massive volumes of printed reports because most people would still rather read text on paper than on a screen.A handful of technology companies, small and large, are trying to overcome that reluctance with innovative hardware and software that aspire to be as user-friendly as a book.The most visible of these efforts are the "expanded books" from Voyager Co. of Santa Monica, Calif.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 13, 1994
Boston. -- It is the story that made strong men cross their legs and strong women giggle about strong men crossing their legs.It was the story that made strong headline writers give in to their weakness for puns.And more to the point, it was the story that made my husband glance up from the newspaper and say, for the only time in our recorded history, ''You could give this a good leaving-alone.''Which is, Lord knows, what I intended to do.One case of male genital mutilation in 200-odd years of American history?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 10, 1993
When Steven Spielberg mutters, "Leapin' Lizards!" he isn' kidding around.Thus his much anticipated version of Michael Crichton's"Jurassic Park" is a festival of leaping lizards -- and cavorting, cartwheeling, gamboling, strutting, bounding and tumbling lizards, which gets exactly at the movie's signal triumph and its primary drawing card: You will believe that they are back. And that they brought their teeth.Will you believe anything else?That's a more difficult question to answer. The set-up is just chilling enough, a variation on a theme Michael Crichton worked earlier in his film "Westworld," about a high-tech amusement park that turned lethal for its customers.
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