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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- While untold hundreds of tennis professionals would just as soon leave Washington to the politicians, Ken Starr and the oppressive summer heat, Michael Chang is one player who looks upon the Legg Mason Tennis Classic tour stop with something approaching relief."
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By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
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SPORTS
July 20, 1998
Where: FitzGerald Tennis Center, Rock Creek Park, 16th and Kennedy streets, NW, Washington, D.C.When: Sessions 4 and 7 p.m. daily today through Friday; semifinals Saturday at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.; championship Sunday at 4 p.m.Field: 56 men's singles; 28 men's doubles.1997 champion: Michael Chang.Purse: $700,000. $90,000 to winner.Tickets: Available for all sessions at the gate or by calling 410-481-SEAT.Pub Date: 7/20/98
SPORTS
July 20, 1998
Where: FitzGerald Tennis Center, Rock Creek Park, 16th and Kennedy streets, NW, Washington, D.C.When: Sessions 4 and 7 p.m. daily today through Friday; semifinals Saturday at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.; championship Sunday at 4 p.m.Field: 56 men's singles; 28 men's doubles.1997 champion: Michael Chang.Purse: $700,000. $90,000 to winner.Tickets: Available for all sessions at the gate or by calling 410-481-SEAT.Pub Date: 7/20/98
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1995
NEW YORK -- Michael Chang and Byron Black are the water bugs of the U.S. Open. You can see them darting left and right, tracking down every lob, every crosscourt passing shot, every bullet down the line.Chang is the little American who could. He doesn't have a serve as big as the serve Pete Sampras has. He doesn't have the ground strokes that Andre Agassi has. And he doesn't have Jim Courier's size. But every player going on the court against him knows they are going to have to be on their game every moment, that they are going to have to beat Michael Chang, because Michael Chang is not going to beat himself.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If it wasn't for a delayed line call against him Friday night, Michael Chang might not have arrived as the No. 3 player in the world yesterday and been in line today to win the 25th tournament of his still-young career.Seemingly on the way to another workmanlike victory against Vince Spadea in the third-round match Friday, Chang jumped up in the air to avoid a ball as it whizzed by. He assumed it was out. It was called good. Just one lost point later, he had blown the set.It set off an alarm.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Michael Chang has had problems throughout his career with big hitters. They would wear him down with their pulverizing serves, and wear out the most indefatigable player in tennis with their grinding ground strokes.Until last night, the one exception for Chang was Pete Sampras. Ever since the Southern California native turned pro, theirs has been a rivalry in which the little man dominated. Chang had won six of eight matches overall, six of seven on hardcourts.Just when it seemed that Chang would continue his magic spell in their quarterfinal match of the U.S. Open, Sampras figured Chang out. And just when it looked as if they would take this rivalry to new heights, Sampras blew Chang off the Stadium Court at the National Tennis Center.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Michael Chang, one of the favorites in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic that begins Monday at the FitzGerald Tennis Center in Washington, learned something about his game when he was dumped in the first round at Wimbledon a couple of weeks ago."Next time, I won't try to be [a serve-and-volley] attacker," he said. "That's not my game."Chang's game, a style that helped him win the French Open on slow clay at the age of 17 and become a Top 10 player in the years since, involves ground strokes, patience, brains and an ability to run down almost any ball in sight.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
NEW YORK -- The wait for Michael Chang wasn't merely five hours yesterday. It wasn't merely waiting out a rain delay at the National Tennis Center for his third-round U.S. Open match with Bernd Karbacher to finally begin last night.The wait for Chang was much longer: three months. It took that long for the world's seventh-ranked player to get another shot at Karbacher, a 25-year-old German whose claim to fame was beating Chang in all three matches they had played."I made a few adjustments," said Chang, who had lost to the 40th-ranked Karbacher once last year and then at successive tournaments this year, including in the second round of the French Open.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Heading into yesterday's Legg Mason Tennis Classic final, Michael Chang described his opponent Wayne Ferreira as "one of the more well-rounded guys on tour. He has a big serve, good backhand, good forehand and he can play serve and volley."The assessment didn't seem to leave any area in which to attack or exploit Ferreira, so how come Chang breezed, 6-2, 6-4?The defeated South African had the answer: "I served horribly."As happens way more often than not when Chang plays, he went into his give-nothing-up mode: "I figure I had to cut down on my errors and play good, solid tennis if Wayne was on."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- While untold hundreds of tennis professionals would just as soon leave Washington to the politicians, Ken Starr and the oppressive summer heat, Michael Chang is one player who looks upon the Legg Mason Tennis Classic tour stop with something approaching relief."
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 1998
MELBOURNE, Australia -- One player, the baldish and flighty one, has just returned from a self-styled trip to oblivion that taught him to treat his tennis talent like a brand new car and demonstrate some pride of ownership. The other player, the gritty workaholic whose tennis talent has suddenly gone bankrupt, seems headed toward oblivion.Andre Agassi, ranked 87th in the world but light-years away from the player he was when he won the Australian Open on his maiden voyage here in 1995, pulled off what he termed "a significant upset" last night.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Heading into yesterday's Legg Mason Tennis Classic final, Michael Chang described his opponent Wayne Ferreira as "one of the more well-rounded guys on tour. He has a big serve, good backhand, good forehand and he can play serve and volley."The assessment didn't seem to leave any area in which to attack or exploit Ferreira, so how come Chang breezed, 6-2, 6-4?The defeated South African had the answer: "I served horribly."As happens way more often than not when Chang plays, he went into his give-nothing-up mode: "I figure I had to cut down on my errors and play good, solid tennis if Wayne was on."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If it wasn't for a delayed line call against him Friday night, Michael Chang might not have arrived as the No. 3 player in the world yesterday and been in line today to win the 25th tournament of his still-young career.Seemingly on the way to another workmanlike victory against Vince Spadea in the third-round match Friday, Chang jumped up in the air to avoid a ball as it whizzed by. He assumed it was out. It was called good. Just one lost point later, he had blown the set.It set off an alarm.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Michael Chang, one of the favorites in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic that begins Monday at the FitzGerald Tennis Center in Washington, learned something about his game when he was dumped in the first round at Wimbledon a couple of weeks ago."Next time, I won't try to be [a serve-and-volley] attacker," he said. "That's not my game."Chang's game, a style that helped him win the French Open on slow clay at the age of 17 and become a Top 10 player in the years since, involves ground strokes, patience, brains and an ability to run down almost any ball in sight.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1995
NEW YORK -- Michael Chang and Byron Black are the water bugs of the U.S. Open. You can see them darting left and right, tracking down every lob, every crosscourt passing shot, every bullet down the line.Chang is the little American who could. He doesn't have a serve as big as the serve Pete Sampras has. He doesn't have the ground strokes that Andre Agassi has. And he doesn't have Jim Courier's size. But every player going on the court against him knows they are going to have to be on their game every moment, that they are going to have to beat Michael Chang, because Michael Chang is not going to beat himself.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 1998
MELBOURNE, Australia -- One player, the baldish and flighty one, has just returned from a self-styled trip to oblivion that taught him to treat his tennis talent like a brand new car and demonstrate some pride of ownership. The other player, the gritty workaholic whose tennis talent has suddenly gone bankrupt, seems headed toward oblivion.Andre Agassi, ranked 87th in the world but light-years away from the player he was when he won the Australian Open on his maiden voyage here in 1995, pulled off what he termed "a significant upset" last night.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Michael Chang has had problems throughout his career with big hitters. They would wear him down with their pulverizing serves, and wear out the most indefatigable player in tennis with their grinding ground strokes.Until last night, the one exception for Chang was Pete Sampras. Ever since the Southern California native turned pro, theirs has been a rivalry in which the little man dominated. Chang had won six of eight matches overall, six of seven on hardcourts.Just when it seemed that Chang would continue his magic spell in their quarterfinal match of the U.S. Open, Sampras figured Chang out. And just when it looked as if they would take this rivalry to new heights, Sampras blew Chang off the Stadium Court at the National Tennis Center.
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