Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMichael Chabon
IN THE NEWS

Michael Chabon

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
"A Model World and Other Stories, Michael Chabon, 207 pages, William Morrow and Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., $18.95.MICHAEL CHABON wrote his novel "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh" as his thesis at the graduate writing workshop of the University of California at Irvine. "The Mysteries" earned him his M.F.A. and a $155,000 advance from his publisher.The Mysteries also made him a very hot young author. Chabon was about the same age as was F. Scott Fitzgerald when he published his first novel, "This Side of Paradise.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2007
NEW YORK All the seats are taken half an hour before he is due to arrive. Green velvet ropes hold back all the throngs who will have to stand. Two NYPD cruisers are parked out front for security. Men with walkie-talkies track his every move. It is a few minutes after 7, on a chilly night in early May, when Michael Chabon steps off an escalator onto the fourth floor of the Barnes & Noble in Union Square. At the first sight of his unruly brown hair, the crowd of 600 erupts in whistles and applause.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Mr. Warren is Book Editor of The Sun | June 30, 1991
A MODEL WORLD: AND OTHER STORIES.Michael Chabon.Morrow.` 207 pages. $18.95.Nearly everyone walks carefully through life in the 11 stories that make up Michael Chabon's "A Model World." The characters are wounded, perpetually doubtful. They are young men involved in hopeless love affairs, or wondering when their first one -- hopeless or otherwise -- will occur. They are adolescent males whose families are torn apart by divorce, yet cannot find the right way to express their anger and pain.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 6, 2007
The Yiddish Policemen's Union By Michael Chabon HarperCollins / 411 pages / $26.95 Let's begin with an uncomfortable question: What has Michael Chabon been up to for the past seven years? Certainly he's been writing; in 2002, he published Summerland, a lengthy baseball fantasy for young readers, and two years later, his novella The Final Solution imagined Sherlock Holmes as an old man. He has also edited a couple of anthologies and created a series of comic books featuring the Escapist, the superhero he invented for his novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2001.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
Virginia Pausch was sitting down to breakfast yesterday when she heard the news: Michael Chabon, her student 21 years ago at Howard High School, had won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay." Not only that, but this 659-page opus just happened to be Pausch's favorite of all of Chabon's books. It is the story of two Jewish teen-agers in the late 1930s - a Czech immigrant and his American cousin - who team up to create superheroes during the golden age of comic books.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2007
NEW YORK All the seats are taken half an hour before he is due to arrive. Green velvet ropes hold back all the throngs who will have to stand. Two NYPD cruisers are parked out front for security. Men with walkie-talkies track his every move. It is a few minutes after 7, on a chilly night in early May, when Michael Chabon steps off an escalator onto the fourth floor of the Barnes & Noble in Union Square. At the first sight of his unruly brown hair, the crowd of 600 erupts in whistles and applause.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2004
The Final Solution: A Story of Detection by Michael Chabon. Fourth Estate. 144 pages. $16.95. The crime writer gulps nervously when literary writers dabble in the genre. More precisely, this crime writer worries whenever a non-genre writer decides to take a flier on the form. The result usually ends in an insult either to the work itself, which drips with condescension, or in the response to the work. If critics find fault, the flaws are attributed to what they believe are the genre's limitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 21, 2004
McSweeney's Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories Edited and with an introduction by Michael Chabon (Vintage, 368 pages, $13.95) The goal of this short-story anthology is to revitalize genre fiction -- crime, adventure, sci-fi, horror, and romance stories -- by coaxing new examples from the hippest possible crowd of contemporary fiction writers. It's a formula that worked well in a previous volume, the 2003 Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, also compiled by novelist Michael Chabon and the editors of the literary magazine McSweeney's.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 6, 2007
The Yiddish Policemen's Union By Michael Chabon HarperCollins / 411 pages / $26.95 Let's begin with an uncomfortable question: What has Michael Chabon been up to for the past seven years? Certainly he's been writing; in 2002, he published Summerland, a lengthy baseball fantasy for young readers, and two years later, his novella The Final Solution imagined Sherlock Holmes as an old man. He has also edited a couple of anthologies and created a series of comic books featuring the Escapist, the superhero he invented for his novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2001.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner | August 10, 2008
As the director of the Peabody Institute, Jeffrey Sharkey is the leader of undergraduate and graduate students in the Peabody Conservatory and Preparatory at the music school at the Johns Hopkins University. Sharkey has been the director for two years, and is an acclaimed pianist and composer as well. Sharkey's music will be featured in a concert at the Peabody Conservatory on Sept. 24 with Jonathan Carney, violinist and concertmaster for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. "A Suitable Boy" by Vikram Seth It's a panoramic novel of India just before independence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 21, 2004
McSweeney's Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories Edited and with an introduction by Michael Chabon (Vintage, 368 pages, $13.95) The goal of this short-story anthology is to revitalize genre fiction -- crime, adventure, sci-fi, horror, and romance stories -- by coaxing new examples from the hippest possible crowd of contemporary fiction writers. It's a formula that worked well in a previous volume, the 2003 Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, also compiled by novelist Michael Chabon and the editors of the literary magazine McSweeney's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2004
The Final Solution: A Story of Detection by Michael Chabon. Fourth Estate. 144 pages. $16.95. The crime writer gulps nervously when literary writers dabble in the genre. More precisely, this crime writer worries whenever a non-genre writer decides to take a flier on the form. The result usually ends in an insult either to the work itself, which drips with condescension, or in the response to the work. If critics find fault, the flaws are attributed to what they believe are the genre's limitations.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
Virginia Pausch was sitting down to breakfast yesterday when she heard the news: Michael Chabon, her student 21 years ago at Howard High School, had won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay." Not only that, but this 659-page opus just happened to be Pausch's favorite of all of Chabon's books. It is the story of two Jewish teen-agers in the late 1930s - a Czech immigrant and his American cousin - who team up to create superheroes during the golden age of comic books.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
"A Model World and Other Stories, Michael Chabon, 207 pages, William Morrow and Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., $18.95.MICHAEL CHABON wrote his novel "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh" as his thesis at the graduate writing workshop of the University of California at Irvine. "The Mysteries" earned him his M.F.A. and a $155,000 advance from his publisher.The Mysteries also made him a very hot young author. Chabon was about the same age as was F. Scott Fitzgerald when he published his first novel, "This Side of Paradise.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Mr. Warren is Book Editor of The Sun | June 30, 1991
A MODEL WORLD: AND OTHER STORIES.Michael Chabon.Morrow.` 207 pages. $18.95.Nearly everyone walks carefully through life in the 11 stories that make up Michael Chabon's "A Model World." The characters are wounded, perpetually doubtful. They are young men involved in hopeless love affairs, or wondering when their first one -- hopeless or otherwise -- will occur. They are adolescent males whose families are torn apart by divorce, yet cannot find the right way to express their anger and pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Thanks to all who played our latest quiz on Baltimore-area authors. For those who were stumped, here are the answers: 1. A frequent heroine in Laura Lippman novels is former reporter (and Lippman alter-ego?) Tess Monaghan, whose greyhound is named Esskay. 2. Russell Baker worked at The Sun before becoming a commentator for The New York Times. His wonderful memoir about Baltimore is called Growing Up. 3. Anne Tyler, whose novels include The Accidental Tourist, Saint Maybe and Digging to America, often chronicles the love and conflict of family life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Looking back at a year of reading, I noticed that many of my choices were older books. When I headed to Colorado on vacation, I read Willa Cather's My Antonia. I also filled some glaring holes in my reading list; that led me (at last) to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Other favorites from my 2008 list: * Deadwood by Pete Dexter. The fictional tale of an aging Wild Bill Hickok offers a warts-and-all view of the West. There's little heroism - just mud and blood and early death. And motley characters, including a gunslinger who carries around a human head in hopes of collecting a bounty.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.