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Michael Caine

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By Angela Fox Dunn and Angela Fox Dunn,New York Times Syndicate | January 10, 1993
Michael Caine divides his life so far exactly in half. His first 29 years were hell; his next 29 have been, for the most part, heavenly. But he says he had a devil of a time finding paradise.Amazingly youthful for 59, Mr. Caine says he has exorcised his demons and is taking on new challenges.No wonder the title of his recently published autobiography, his sixth book, poses the question: "What's It All About?" (Turtle Bay Books, 1992).Yes, the title refers to his famous film "Alfie" (1966)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
It's fitting that Michael Caine is opening at the Charles in "Harry Brown" today, just when the AFI-Silver in Silver Spring is launching a mammoth retrospective for this astonishingly gifted and versatile actor. Caine has gone from his signature role as a Cockney womanizer in "Alfie" (an opening-day attraction at the AFI series) to playing Alfred the Butler for the screen's reigning vigilante, the Dark Knight. In "Harry Brown," he could be called a Cockney vigilante. But that label would be reductive because Caine is extraordinary at infusing this character with everything he's learned about life and death and art. He turns a graphic urban-terror film into the story of a man who refuses (in the poet Dylan Thomas' words)
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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2003
No great writer knew more about movies than Graham Greene. In the 1930s he penned inspired film criticism, and in the 1940s he wrote two classic scripts for director Carol Reed: The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949). Of the dozens of movies adapted by others from Greene's novels and stories, Australian director Phillip Noyce's The Quiet American ranks with the best. Greene himself would have applauded. Michael Caine gives the performance of a lifetime in this potent tale of political and spiritual betrayal in 1952 Vietnam.
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By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | May 1, 2009
It is a trembly and vulnerable Michael Caine who we see in Is Anybody There?, a finely drawn and gentle British drama propelled by another of the star's unforgettable screen portraits. Caine plays Clarence, an aging magician struggling to keep hold of his dignity and his mind in the face of the pitiless approach of old age. He's been packed off to Lark Hall, an old-age home in a small seaside town, a sort of boarding house for those not far from whatever eternity awaits them. What Clarence discovers is an unexpected friendship with Edward (Bill Milner)
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By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | May 1, 2009
It is a trembly and vulnerable Michael Caine who we see in Is Anybody There?, a finely drawn and gentle British drama propelled by another of the star's unforgettable screen portraits. Caine plays Clarence, an aging magician struggling to keep hold of his dignity and his mind in the face of the pitiless approach of old age. He's been packed off to Lark Hall, an old-age home in a small seaside town, a sort of boarding house for those not far from whatever eternity awaits them. What Clarence discovers is an unexpected friendship with Edward (Bill Milner)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2002
Has any other movie actor sustained a busy and diverse career as well as Michael Caine? Gene Hackman and Samuel L. Jackson must be the only other contenders. At age 69, Caine has made more than 130 major movie and TV appearances (not counting guest spots like his cameos on Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In). More important, he has managed to pull off the feat of becoming at once an identifiable star whose name alone evokes a Cockney cool and a versatile character actor. As he swings from the extremes of colorful surrogate-fatherhood in The Cider House Rules (1999)
NEWS
March 27, 2000
Best Actor: Kevin Spacey, "American Beauty" Best Actress: Hilary Swank, "Boys Don't Cry" Best Supporting Actor: Michael Caine, "The Cider House Rules" Best Supporting Actress: Angelina Jolie, "Girl, Interrupted" Best Picture: "American Beauty" Best Director: Sam Mendes, "American Beauty"
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March 27, 2000
Best Actor: Kevin Spacey, "American Beauty" Best Actress: Hilary Swank, "Boys Don't Cry" Best Supporting Actor: Michael Caine, "The Cider House Rules" Best Supporting Actress: Angelina Jolie, "Girl, Interrupted" Best Picture: "American Beauty" Best Director: Sam Mendes, "American Beauty"
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By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | December 14, 2007
One would imagine it is something of a bittersweet triumph for an actor to endure long enough to revisit a glory moment from his youth, albeit from the vantage point of an older character. Unlike many of his classically schooled contemporaries in England, it was never in the cards for Michael Caine to ascend from playing King Lear's Edgar, say, to Lear himself. But then how many veterans of the Royal Shakespeare Company can lay claim to having done two film versions of the super-hit stage thriller Sleuth?
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By Los Angeles Times | March 21, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Michael Caine, Carol Burnett, John Ritter, Julie Hagerty, Christopher Reeve, Denholm Elliott and Mark Linn-Baker will star in Hollywood Pictures' film adaptation of "Noises Off," Michael Frayn's stage farce.Director Peter Bogdanovich begins production in early spring, possibly in Santa Barbara, Calif., of the humorous behind-the-scenes tale of a bedraggled British theater company touring the provinces.
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July 20, 2008
Theater The Taming of the Shrew : 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 3. Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $15-$25. Call 410-366-8594 or go to baltimore shakespeare.org. Talk about a Dream Team. For the Bard's classic, comic battle of the sexes, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has signed on some of the area's top acting talent. James Kinstle, the festival's former artistic director and a gifted comic actor, will play the role of the hyper-macho Petruchio.
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By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | December 14, 2007
One would imagine it is something of a bittersweet triumph for an actor to endure long enough to revisit a glory moment from his youth, albeit from the vantage point of an older character. Unlike many of his classically schooled contemporaries in England, it was never in the cards for Michael Caine to ascend from playing King Lear's Edgar, say, to Lear himself. But then how many veterans of the Royal Shakespeare Company can lay claim to having done two film versions of the super-hit stage thriller Sleuth?
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By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
The comic as philosopher is not a new concept. Lenny Bruce laid unspoken claim to the mantle, and Richard Pryor, despite his pyrotechnics and profanities, was cerebral first and foremost. Even the Monty Python guys reveled in metaphysics, often while wearing frumpy dresses. Now, Craig Ferguson, the hilariously digressive host of CBS' The Late Late Show, goes deep into the ether of the subconscious in his first novel, Between the Bridge and the River (Chronicle Books), a Jungian jaunt through evangelical extremism, terminal illness, fleeting love and Hollywood excess.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Garth and Hub McCann are the kind of uncles we all wish we had. And Secondhand Lions, the story of a summer spent as reluctant mentors to a great-nephew they didn't know they had, is the kind of movie we all hope for. Entertaining, thrilling and honestly sentimental, it's an equal-opportunity crowd-pleaser: Kids will love the adventure aspects, adults will like the memories it evokes of the fun relatives they grew up adoring, and everyone should appreciate...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2003
No great writer knew more about movies than Graham Greene. In the 1930s he penned inspired film criticism, and in the 1940s he wrote two classic scripts for director Carol Reed: The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949). Of the dozens of movies adapted by others from Greene's novels and stories, Australian director Phillip Noyce's The Quiet American ranks with the best. Greene himself would have applauded. Michael Caine gives the performance of a lifetime in this potent tale of political and spiritual betrayal in 1952 Vietnam.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2002
Convention says that most actors would rather be onstage than on-screen - you know, the smell of greasepaint, the roar of a live crowd, the thrill of getting an immediate response to your performance. But that's not Mark Redfield, a fixture on the local stage for much of the 1990s. Five years have passed since his last performance before a live audience; this summer, he completed his first movie, an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, for which he wears the myriad hats of actor, director, set designer, co-producer and co-screenwriter.
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By Lou Cedrone | October 11, 1990
*''Memphis Belle'' A World War II film in which a B-17 crew hopes so survive its 25th mission. Matthew Modine and Eric Stoltz are in the cast.*''Mr. Destiny''James Belushi is a young man who believes his life would be much better had he hit that baseball, years before, in the high school championship game. A stranger (Michael Caine) shows him how life would have been if he had.* 'Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael'' Winona Ryder is Dinky Rosetti, a teen-ager who hopes to follow in the steps of the local girl who made good.
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February 16, 2000
BEST PICTURE "American Beauty" "The Cider House Rules" "The Green Mile" "The Insider" "The Sixth Sense" BEST ACTOR Russell Crowe "The Insider" Richard Farnsworth "The Straight Story" Sean Penn "Sweet and Lowdown" Kevin Spacey "American Beauty" Denzel Washington "The Hurricane" BEST ACTRESS Annette Bening "American Beauty" Janet McTeer "Tumbleweeds" Julianne Moore "The End of the Affair" Meryl Streep "Music of the Heart" Hilary...
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2002
Has any other movie actor sustained a busy and diverse career as well as Michael Caine? Gene Hackman and Samuel L. Jackson must be the only other contenders. At age 69, Caine has made more than 130 major movie and TV appearances (not counting guest spots like his cameos on Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In). More important, he has managed to pull off the feat of becoming at once an identifiable star whose name alone evokes a Cockney cool and a versatile character actor. As he swings from the extremes of colorful surrogate-fatherhood in The Cider House Rules (1999)
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