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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Michael Bloomberg, chairman of the Johns Hopkins Board of Trustees, has his eye on an even higher-profile office - mayor of New York. According to various published reports, Bloomberg has yet to make up his mind if he will seek to follow Rudy Giuliani in that position, but has taken a number of steps in that direction. The billionaire has staked out several Web site domain names that could be used in a campaign, conducted a name-recognition poll, hired a former deputy mayor of the city as an adviser and changed his registration from Democrat to Republican, beating the deadline to qualify as a candidate for that party's nomination next year.
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NEWS
April 17, 2014
This week, Michael R. Bloomberg announced he would be writing a check to support a grass-roots get-out-the-vote effort to counteract the National Rifle Association. This is hardly a shock as Mr. Bloomberg has supported the fight against gun violence before, but the amount involved was eye-opening — $50 million. This invites two initial realizations. First, that one of the nation's richest men can casually write a check the size of a lotto jackpot as others might pluck a few cans for the neighborhood food drive, and second, that we live in an age of dueling oligarchs (take that, Koch brothers)
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
NEW YORK -- The 15th-floor reception area of the building at 59th Street and Park Avenue in midtown Manhattan is a frenzy of contrasts.Men in gray-flannel suits sit in tiny glass-enclosed conference rooms; long-haired, blue-jeaned techies stride on a spiral stairway that leads to the floors above and below. Harried employees grab snacks from counters in the middle of the room, while tropical fish float serenely in aquariums stuck in the middle of support columns.Into this madness enters the nonstop Michael R. Bloomberg.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 12, 2013
Perhaps you remember when Dr. Doom conquered the world. Or perhaps you don't. Sadly enough, even in this day and age, not everyone is comic book literate. Suffice it to say, then, that back in the 1980s, Marvel Comics published a graphic novel in which the villainous Victor von Doom achieved his dearest goal: to rule the world. And he made it a better place, too. Famine ended, the stock market climbed, crime fell, occupying armies withdrew, racial oppression vanished. Doom turned the planet into a paradise, and the only cost of his beneficence was free will.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
Perhaps college grades can tell some of the story. Imagine Mike Bloomberg, age 21, hunched over his desk in an engineering class in Morgenthaler Hall. It was spring 1963, his junior year at Johns Hopkins University. And he had plenty to think about besides electrical circuits. In those days, the mayor-elect of New York was already a master juggler. He was president of his fraternity and the Inter-Fraternity Council. The self-described "all-around Big Man on Campus" was also working five afternoons a week at the faculty club parking lot. And there were dances and frat parties to plan at the then all-male college.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 12, 2013
Perhaps you remember when Dr. Doom conquered the world. Or perhaps you don't. Sadly enough, even in this day and age, not everyone is comic book literate. Suffice it to say, then, that back in the 1980s, Marvel Comics published a graphic novel in which the villainous Victor von Doom achieved his dearest goal: to rule the world. And he made it a better place, too. Famine ended, the stock market climbed, crime fell, occupying armies withdrew, racial oppression vanished. Doom turned the planet into a paradise, and the only cost of his beneficence was free will.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg traveled down to Baltimore's Harbor East neighborhood Friday to urge passage of same-sex marriage when Marylanders go to the polls this election. Bloomberg joined Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake at a press event at the Four Seasons Hotel.  "When two people commit their lives to each other, government has no right standing in their way," Bloomberg said. Bloomberg, a graduate of Johns Hopkins University, recently donated $250,000 to the Marylanders for Marriage Equality campaign.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
Michael R. Bloomberg was upset. He had indulged too much over the holiday season and lost his standing bet with a friend at the end of the year. Both try to meet a set weight limit every six weeks.But Bloomberg, who somehow manages to be ruthlessly competitive and relentlessly good-natured at the same time, had a plan.With the next weigh-in coming up, Bloomberg was sure his 5 a.m. 45-minute runs around New York's Central Park and what he calls "a starvation diet" meant that he had met his 169-pound target.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 25, 2001
Hasim Rahman for governor! The violent demonstrators of Quebec were incoherent about what they oppose, but eloquent on the virtues of violent demonstration. Michael Bloomberg has done more good for Baltimore than anyone since Johns Hopkins. As punishment, he may have to serve as mayor of Gotham. Commander Waddle and the Navy let each other off the hook, which plays pretty well in the service, but not in Japan.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
By any measure, The Johns Hopkins University is an extraordinarily important institution in our city and our state. It is at once a world class educational institution, a major employer and a financial driver. I find it astonishing that Michael Bloomberg's donation to Hopkins ("Bloomberg gives Hopkins $350 million," Jan. 27), the fifth largest donation by an individual ever made to a university worldwide, and but the latest installment in a remarkable series of gifts, merits in-depth front page coverage in The New York Times, but not The Sun. Eric B. Miller
NEWS
January 29, 2013
By any measure, The Johns Hopkins University is an extraordinarily important institution in our city and our state. It is at once a world class educational institution, a major employer and a financial driver. I find it astonishing that Michael Bloomberg's donation to Hopkins ("Bloomberg gives Hopkins $350 million," Jan. 27), the fifth largest donation by an individual ever made to a university worldwide, and but the latest installment in a remarkable series of gifts, merits in-depth front page coverage in The New York Times, but not The Sun. Eric B. Miller
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg traveled down to Baltimore's Harbor East neighborhood Friday to urge passage of same-sex marriage when Marylanders go to the polls this election. Bloomberg joined Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake at a press event at the Four Seasons Hotel.  "When two people commit their lives to each other, government has no right standing in their way," Bloomberg said. Bloomberg, a graduate of Johns Hopkins University, recently donated $250,000 to the Marylanders for Marriage Equality campaign.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Michael Bloomberg's first donation to Johns Hopkins was $5, which he gave the year after he graduated in 1964 from the university with an engineering degree. The New York mayor now ranks as Hopkins' largest contributor, and possibly the largest donor to any American university, and his ties and interests in Baltimore have spread throughout the city. On Thursday, the philanthropist and politician attended the dedication for a new Johns Hopkins hospital he helped build. Bloomberg gave $120 million to help build the $1.1 billion state-of-the-art hospital, bringing his lifetime donations to Hopkins institutions to $800 million for buildings, professorships, research and art. In the years since Bloomberg graduated, he made a fortune, became mayor of New York City and established himself as a champion of public health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 16, 2011
If the nation’s mayors have been AWOL from their respective City Halls lately, they’ve probably been ducking out to their local bocce courts, warming up for Baltimore. The U.S. Conference of Mayors meets here for four days starting Friday, and along with many weighty matters on the agenda, there’s this planned for Friday night: “Up for a Little Late Night Bocce and Dessert in Little Italy? Tonight’s after party will offer a dessert extravaganza in Baltimore’s Little Italy.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
Graduating students should ignore partisanship and conventional wisdom in favor of asking tough questions about the issues facing the world, said New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in remarks Thursday morning at the Johns Hopkins University's commencement. "No ideology has God on its side or a choir of angels at its feet," Bloomberg said, alluding to the state of political discourse in Washington. "Your professors have never trained you to follow the crowd. … Never trust anyone who reflexively shoots down an idea because it comes from a different party or ideology."
NEWS
May 30, 2006
Each one of you has had two important principles deeply embedded in you through your association with this amazing institution: an unwavering allegiance to the power of science and a profound commitment to use that power to help people. And this is a good thing, because now more than ever, these two fundamental concepts are being ignored, or are under attack. Today, we are seeing hundreds of years of scientific discovery being challenged by people who simply disregard facts that don't happen to agree with their agendas.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
Michael Bloomberg, mayor-elect of New York City, said yesterday he plans to resign from the Johns Hopkins University board of trustees when his term as chairman is up in May. Not surprisingly, the financial mogul said he's going to be a little busy running one of the largest cities in the world. "You can't really do both," Bloomberg said yesterday while in Baltimore for a board meeting. Bloomberg, a 1964 electrical engineering graduate of Johns Hopkins, added that he's resigning from all the company boards he sits on, not just that of his alma mater.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Maryland Public Television will expand its daily early morning program, "Bloomberg Business News," from 15 minutes to a half-hour next month.To make room for the show, scheduled to air from 6:30 to 7 a.m. weekdays beginning Feb. 6, MPT will discontinue the locally produced "A. M. Weather." The show, now seen at 6:45 a.m., has for 16 years provided forecasts aimed at pilots, farmers and others requiring detailed weather news." 'A. M. Weather' is a series we're proud of, and we know it has a loyal audience," Raymond K. K. Ho, MPT's president, said yesterday.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
No one knows exactly how much money Michael R. Bloomberg has given to Johns Hopkins over the years. He has acknowledged up to $107.5 million. The real total might be several times that amount. Sources have tied this week's anonymous $100 million gift to the munificence of the mayor of New York. Another anonymous $100 million that established an institute to study malaria in 2001 is widely believed to have come from Bloomberg. The same is true of a few million that came with an order to quickly do a cosmetic renovation of the Homewood campus in 2000.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
Michael Bloomberg, mayor-elect of New York City, said yesterday he plans to resign from the Johns Hopkins University board of trustees when his term as chairman is up in May. Not surprisingly, the financial mogul said he's going to be a little busy running one of the largest cities in the world. "You can't really do both," Bloomberg said yesterday while in Baltimore for a board meeting. Bloomberg, a 1964 electrical engineering graduate of Johns Hopkins, added that he's resigning from all the company boards he sits on, not just that of his alma mater.
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