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By Luke Broadwater | July 8, 2011
Where was the TSA when we needed them?  Nation Somehow Failed To Predict Attack By Michael Bay
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater | July 8, 2011
Where was the TSA when we needed them?  Nation Somehow Failed To Predict Attack By Michael Bay
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | June 26, 2009
The little-boy fantasy of cars coming to life and turning into giant talking robots from outer space plummets straight into the high-tech junkyard in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, a movie that manages to mangle a whole slew of sure-fire fantasies. For slightly younger boys, the Transformers series taps into the infantile wish fulfillment of smashing things up without really damaging them. And for slightly older boys, the films showcase Megan Fox as Mikaela Banes, the grease-monkey beauty who loves our teenage hero, Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | June 26, 2009
The little-boy fantasy of cars coming to life and turning into giant talking robots from outer space plummets straight into the high-tech junkyard in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, a movie that manages to mangle a whole slew of sure-fire fantasies. For slightly younger boys, the Transformers series taps into the infantile wish fulfillment of smashing things up without really damaging them. And for slightly older boys, the films showcase Megan Fox as Mikaela Banes, the grease-monkey beauty who loves our teenage hero, Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2007
More so than any movie in recent memory, Transformers insists that audiences just go with it. Do that, and you might be surprised how much fun you'll have. Resist, and this probably wasn't a wise filmgoing choice in the first place. Opening tonight in some theaters and tomorrow everywhere else, the action flick has so much going for it - namely, the supremely cool spectacle of watching cars and trucks rearrange themselves into giant robots - that its very real problems are easy to overlook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 7, 1995
What're you going to do? "Bad Boys" comes for you.It's almost pointless to review such a juggernaut: It isn't a movie, it's an industrial-strength, turbo-charged money machine bearing down on you at about 70 miles an hour. You don't tell people what's wrong with it, you just get out of the way!All this would be easier to take if the movie -- no matter how crude, crass, greedy and manipulative -- had just been more likable. It's not very likable at all. That's not to say it isn't funny, but watching it is like being pistol-whipped by a stand-up comic with a really neat gun.The movie -- if you couldn't guess -- is one of those wild, cop things, a huge caper deal that's so overproduced and over-orchestrated it seems set on the planet Dune.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 25, 2001
When three commercial moviemakers set out to create "Pearl Harbor," they faced a central question. How do you make the events of Dec. 7, 1941, pertinent to generations who barely remember later milestones, like Nov. 22, 1963? The solution for producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Top Gun"), director Michael Bay ("Armageddon") and screenwriter Randall Wallace ("Braveheart") was to manufacture a "personal" story about two Army fly-boy friends and the Navy nurse they both love - a triangle that comes together in Hawaii on Dec. 6. The outcome is that young moviegoers will emerge thinking that Pearl Harbor was only secondarily the site of the Japanese sneak attack that pulled us into World War II. To them, it will be primarily the place where a couple of daredevils took their P-40s into the air, downed a half-dozen Zeroes, raced to the hospital to give blood at the request of their fair maiden, and then jumped into the harbor to rescue drowning sailors.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Whether in The Adventures of Robin Hood or The Wild Bunch, action-movie art often occurs when directors apply fierce commitment and instinct to implausible exploits - and create revelation, wonder and excitement. Nowhere is that more evident than in the masterworks of Japan's great director Akira Kurosawa and his lesser-known equal Masaki Kobayashi. They and their stars, Toshiro Mifune and Tatsuya Nakadai, are at the center of the Charles Theatre's three-month series of samurai movies, playing Saturdays at noon, Mondays at 7 p.m. and Thursdays at 9 p.m., through mid-September.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 11, 2011
Is there a better way to market your product than naming "East Bound & Down's" Kenny Powers your CEO?  That's just what K-Swiss did with its new YouTube marketing campaign.  The videos -- which in true Powers style are profane (cover your ears children!) -- feature cameos from Michael Bay, Matt Cassel, Jillian Michaels, and MMA Champion Jon "Bones" Jones, among others, who now apparently help Powers run the company.  K-Swiss now has a new slogan too: "Shut up and buy them.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 1, 1998
Early on in "Armageddon" there are clues to what we are in for: the opening narration, which is delivered by Charlton Heston in tones reserved for high school science films; the line "Nothing will survive, not even bacteria my God, what'll we do?"; the incessant thrum of music meant to stir the patriotic hearts of good Americans and the adrenal glands of adolescent boys everywhere.The scale, the self-importance, the over-produced sentiment -- there can be no doubt that this is a Michael Bay production.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2007
More so than any movie in recent memory, Transformers insists that audiences just go with it. Do that, and you might be surprised how much fun you'll have. Resist, and this probably wasn't a wise filmgoing choice in the first place. Opening tonight in some theaters and tomorrow everywhere else, the action flick has so much going for it - namely, the supremely cool spectacle of watching cars and trucks rearrange themselves into giant robots - that its very real problems are easy to overlook.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Whether in The Adventures of Robin Hood or The Wild Bunch, action-movie art often occurs when directors apply fierce commitment and instinct to implausible exploits - and create revelation, wonder and excitement. Nowhere is that more evident than in the masterworks of Japan's great director Akira Kurosawa and his lesser-known equal Masaki Kobayashi. They and their stars, Toshiro Mifune and Tatsuya Nakadai, are at the center of the Charles Theatre's three-month series of samurai movies, playing Saturdays at noon, Mondays at 7 p.m. and Thursdays at 9 p.m., through mid-September.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 25, 2001
When three commercial moviemakers set out to create "Pearl Harbor," they faced a central question. How do you make the events of Dec. 7, 1941, pertinent to generations who barely remember later milestones, like Nov. 22, 1963? The solution for producer Jerry Bruckheimer ("Top Gun"), director Michael Bay ("Armageddon") and screenwriter Randall Wallace ("Braveheart") was to manufacture a "personal" story about two Army fly-boy friends and the Navy nurse they both love - a triangle that comes together in Hawaii on Dec. 6. The outcome is that young moviegoers will emerge thinking that Pearl Harbor was only secondarily the site of the Japanese sneak attack that pulled us into World War II. To them, it will be primarily the place where a couple of daredevils took their P-40s into the air, downed a half-dozen Zeroes, raced to the hospital to give blood at the request of their fair maiden, and then jumped into the harbor to rescue drowning sailors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 7, 1995
What're you going to do? "Bad Boys" comes for you.It's almost pointless to review such a juggernaut: It isn't a movie, it's an industrial-strength, turbo-charged money machine bearing down on you at about 70 miles an hour. You don't tell people what's wrong with it, you just get out of the way!All this would be easier to take if the movie -- no matter how crude, crass, greedy and manipulative -- had just been more likable. It's not very likable at all. That's not to say it isn't funny, but watching it is like being pistol-whipped by a stand-up comic with a really neat gun.The movie -- if you couldn't guess -- is one of those wild, cop things, a huge caper deal that's so overproduced and over-orchestrated it seems set on the planet Dune.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 14, 2008
I'M GOING to be a big star!" That's what 9-year-old Shia LaBeouf announced to startled and amused adults before he broke into movies. At age 11, undeterred by obscurity, he chose an agent out of the Yellow Pages and told Teresa Dalhquist what a big deal he was. He wasn't, yet, but Ms. Dalhquist was impressed. She got him work on the Disney Channel. Shia is now 21, and Dalhquist remains his agent. I noticed Shia first in Bill Paxton's underrated golf epic, The Greatest Game Ever Played, in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2011
"Transformers: Dark of the Moon" has critics debating whether it's Michael Bay's best 'bot movie. But if history judges No. 3 the best — or at least better than the other two — it won't be a first for a franchise. Ideally, moviemakers grow ever-fonder of their characters and more confident of their powers as a series goes along. That's why affection and inspiration can occasionally reach critical mass at No. 3. Here are three great examples from the past several decades: Goldfinger It's still the ultimate 007 movie for its expert juggling of adventure and invention.
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