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By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 5, 1993
OF MICE AND MEN(MGM/UA, rated PG-13 1992).There's nothing wrong with the notion of remaking a movie of a classic novel, especially when the most recent cinematic incarnation is 53 years old. But any such endeavor faces a number of challenges, especially when its predecessor was nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award.Any such remake needs to justify itself to audiences. After all, if your vacuum sweeper is in fine working order, why do you need a new one?Actor, director and co-producer Gary Sinise fails to make a sale with his new version of John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men."
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EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Even in the Great Depression of the 1930s, dreamers hoped for something better. In John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men," itinerant field hands George Milton and Lennie Small dream of buying land of their own someday. At Tidewater Players, director Todd Starkey leads a group of talented actors in a moving production of the classic, which opens today (March 2). It is set in a sunny harvest season in northern California, 1937. "Of Mice and Men" runs upstairs at 121 N. Union Ave. at Tidewater Players, the community theater of Havre de Grace, weekends through March 18. Friday and Saturday shows are at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinees, at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10. Visit http://www.tidewaterplayers.com or pay at the door.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2000
In its 52nd season, Colonial Players is staging for the first time John Steinbeck's masterpiece, "Of Mice and Men" - and it is a triumphant first for the venerable company. Set in Northern California during the Great Depression, "Of Mice and Men" tells the story of two migrant farm workers who support each other, living among lonely outcasts on a Salinas Valley ranch. George Milton is the responsible, caring friend who looks after Lennie Small, a large, physically powerful, hard-working man who lacks intelligence.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 18, 1993
It takes the kind of guts that separate the men from the boys, or, if you will, the men from the mice, to stage a production of John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" only a few months after the release of the latest critically acclaimed movie version.Yet Theatre Hopkins' current production does convey successfully the tension at the core of this drama about the extremes of human nature, ranging from friendship and loyalty to cruelty and revenge.The stage play, adapted by Steinbeck from his own novel, is a little slow-going early on and some secondary performances are uneven.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2001
The best operas teach us something about others and, more importantly, about ourselves - something that words alone, spoken or read, may not accomplish. John Steinbeck's stark tale Of Mice and Men certainly has plenty to say about the human condition, but this classic narrative can seem even more involving in Carlisle Floyd's faithful operatic version. Floyd's Of Mice and Men is not just a deft adaptation. In its remarkable concision and focus, the opera cuts to the heart of the matter - our capacity to dream, our susceptibility to self-delusion and the rude pain of reality.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 11, 2003
Theatergoers at Company 13 should feel right at home when they see the set for Orphans. That's because the thrift-store furniture on stage bears a remarkable similarity to the thrift-store sofas that serve as audience seating. But if the set - designed by the show's director, W. M. Yarbrough III - looks comfortably broken-in (albeit strewn with debris), the play is considerably less comfortable, and not just because Lyle Kessler's script is intentionally disturbing. It's also uncomfortable because the text is an odd blend of pseudo-David Mamet and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. And, Yarbrough's sluggish staging does little to help matters.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 30, 2001
There isn't a trace of smugness in Carlisle Floyd, but there easily could be. This is the composer who has often been dismissed by pundits, especially in the cultural citadel of New York, as hopelessly old-fashioned, romantic, even provincial. His tuneful music - almost a cross between Puccini and Copland - and straightforward dramas were supposed to have passed their sell-by date long ago, or at least be confined to the unsophisticated provinces. And yet, at 75, Floyd's more popular than ever.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 14, 2001
Director Liz Diamond's production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men at Washington's Arena Stage does what an exceptional revival should do - it brings new insights to an old script. Working with a strong cast, Diamond's simple, straightforward staging illuminates the 1937 play's themes and motifs, and allows us to meet the characters anew. The theme of loneliness snakes through this production like the river that, for most of the evening, is concealed beneath the rough-hewn platform of designer Riccardo Hernandez's sparse, in-the-round set. The river is only visible at the production's start and finish, when the platform splits apart.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [AARON CHESTER] | September 27, 2007
Dancers alone The lowdown -- The Art of the Solo, a compilation of modern dance solos by famous 20th-century choreographers, returns to the Baltimore Museum of Art on Saturday. The program features the revival premiere of Jose Limon's "Two Preludes," Isadora Duncan's "Dances to Chopin" and Murray Louis' "Frail Demons." Artists include Elizabeth Lowe Ahearn, Jayne Bernasconi, Jeanne Bresciani and Kim Gibilisco. If you go -- The show starts at 7 p.m. Saturday at 10 Art Museum Drive. Tickets are $25-$50.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 17, 2004
Michael Healey's The Drawer Boy is an odd play. The title is odd (it refers to a character who was an accomplished artist as a boy). The characters are odd (the protagonists are two reclusive middle-aged Ontario farmers). And the plot is odd (a young actor moves in with the farmers to study them for a play). Of course, odd can be good. And the fine performances in Everyman Theatre's production make the most of the play's three idiosyncratic characters, without making fun of them. But the oddest aspect of this popular Canadian play is that it's all talk and very little action.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 11, 2003
Theatergoers at Company 13 should feel right at home when they see the set for Orphans. That's because the thrift-store furniture on stage bears a remarkable similarity to the thrift-store sofas that serve as audience seating. But if the set - designed by the show's director, W. M. Yarbrough III - looks comfortably broken-in (albeit strewn with debris), the play is considerably less comfortable, and not just because Lyle Kessler's script is intentionally disturbing. It's also uncomfortable because the text is an odd blend of pseudo-David Mamet and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. And, Yarbrough's sluggish staging does little to help matters.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 25, 2003
BY THIS TIME, everyone has a cold weather story to tell. I've got about 8 inches of water standing in my bathroom sink. A 100-year-old cast-iron drain pipe, exposed on the outside of the house, had enough of the freezing temperatures and shut down. This is only the second time in the 24 years I've lived on St. Paul Street that the weather worked its way upstairs. I've been on the watch for household weather trouble all this week. Old city houses and single-digit temperatures can be trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
American writers may be divided into two categories, critic Philip Rahv wrote in the 1940s, "Paleface" or "Redskin." The "Palefaces," from Fenimore Cooper to Henry James, were cerebral, Anglicized, effete and tortured by ambiguity. The "Redskins" reveled in their Americanism. Led by Mark Twain, they were writers of the western hemisphere, "to the wigwam born." Rahv numbered among these boisterous Redskins John Steinbeck. The centennial of his birth comes next Wednesday. Steinbeck, like other of his roaring "Redskin" brethren, turns out to have more popular staying power than the cultish "Palefaces."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 14, 2001
Director Liz Diamond's production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men at Washington's Arena Stage does what an exceptional revival should do - it brings new insights to an old script. Working with a strong cast, Diamond's simple, straightforward staging illuminates the 1937 play's themes and motifs, and allows us to meet the characters anew. The theme of loneliness snakes through this production like the river that, for most of the evening, is concealed beneath the rough-hewn platform of designer Riccardo Hernandez's sparse, in-the-round set. The river is only visible at the production's start and finish, when the platform splits apart.
NEWS
March 5, 1995
They keep doing it, but they don't always win. Last fall, John Steinbeck's 1937 novel, "Of Mice and Men," was taken out of the Loganville high school in Georgia when the mother of one student complained it was "laced with vulgarity." This parent added up a total of 106 profane words, but had not read the book. The Walton County school regulations call for the immediate pulling of texts when even a single parent complains. The school committee that reviews such challenges voted unanimously to keep the book in both the library and classrooms.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 12, 1994
If you're interested in movies of mice and men -- or, to state it another way, if you're interested in movies "Of Mice and Men" -- the Showtime cable network has the evening's most intriguing offering. It's presenting back-to-back prime-time presentations of two film versions, made more than 50 years apart, of the classic John Steinbeck story.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- If you've watched Cloris Leachman in any of Mel Brooks' productions, from "Young Frankenstein" to her Teutonic Ms. Frick on TV's short-lived "The Nutt House," you know what kind of nanny she can play -- and, on tonight's episode of "The Nanny," she does.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 30, 2001
There isn't a trace of smugness in Carlisle Floyd, but there easily could be. This is the composer who has often been dismissed by pundits, especially in the cultural citadel of New York, as hopelessly old-fashioned, romantic, even provincial. His tuneful music - almost a cross between Puccini and Copland - and straightforward dramas were supposed to have passed their sell-by date long ago, or at least be confined to the unsophisticated provinces. And yet, at 75, Floyd's more popular than ever.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2001
The best operas teach us something about others and, more importantly, about ourselves - something that words alone, spoken or read, may not accomplish. John Steinbeck's stark tale Of Mice and Men certainly has plenty to say about the human condition, but this classic narrative can seem even more involving in Carlisle Floyd's faithful operatic version. Floyd's Of Mice and Men is not just a deft adaptation. In its remarkable concision and focus, the opera cuts to the heart of the matter - our capacity to dream, our susceptibility to self-delusion and the rude pain of reality.
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