Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMica
IN THE NEWS

Mica

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Those of us who own houses in Bolton Hill can't even paint our front doors without permission on color choice, and yet the Maryland Institute College of Art can build whatever it pleases ("With modern dorm on North Ave., MICA creates residential hub for students," July 23). Mike Molla, vice president of operations at MICA, is quoted as saying that "contemporary students don't want to live in Victoriana. " Of course, many of them rent apartments in "Victoriana" houses built in the 1870s-to-1890s, and they seem to thrive in them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 26, 2011
Regarding the article crowing about the increase of Chinese students at Maryland Institute College of Art ("MICA enjoys an Eastern influx" May 25): Does this mean that MICA allowed in all talented and eligible American students and there were many spots left over? That in a country of 300-plus million there weren't enough Americans interested in a prestigious art institute? And no deserving citizen was turned away? Of course, it's probably like those hundreds of unwanted slots that will go to illegal immigrants under Maryland's Dream Act. Apparently college admission isn't competitive anymore and our own people have no problem getting a spot where they deserve.
NEWS
By Catherine Mallette and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Projects such as historic restorations and whole-house redos reveal that beauty and excellence are in the details. Every year, the Maryland Improvement Contractor Association (MICA) selects winners for its Remodeler of the Year (ROYAL) Awards. Here, we present the ROYAL Award winners in the residential categories for 2013. American Contracting Services Inc. MICA ROYAL AWARD | Residential Kitchen The kitchen remodeling was part of a whole-house redo in Sparks. The homeowner asked that the kitchen be updated with more storage space and better working space and be given an elegant Maryland countryside theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
As incoming president of Maryland Institute College of Art, Samuel Hoi is succeeding Fred Lazarus IV, who is retiring this spring after nearly 36 years at the helm of an institution that has seen unprecedented growth and prosperity under his direction. But he's not daunted. “That is the wonderful luxury of not coming to an institution that needs to be fixed,” Hoi said Monday, hours after being named. “I'm actually inheriting a well-run organization that I can actually build on. I don't see anything that needs to be fixed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
On any map, the massive continent of Africa is parceled into more than four dozen multicolored parcels. An ambitious new exhibit that opened this week in Manhattan, and which was co-organized by the Maryland Institute College of Art , aims to erase those — and other — distinctions. "We are asking the question, 'What is Africa?'" says Leslie King-Hammond, who directs MICA's Center for Race and Culture and who is co-curator of the exhibit. "We aren't looking at traditional associations with black Africa.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
The vote is in: Maryland Institute College of Art 's part-time faculty have chosen to unionize as Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 500. Two weeks ago, ballots were sent out by the National Labor Relations Board to all members of the part-time faculty. There was one question on the ballot: Should MICA's part-time faculty organize itself as an independent union with the power to negotiate? The ballots arrived at the doorsteps of 350 faculty members. Voters marked the box. They put them in a provided envelope.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
The colorful work of Baltimore's Globe Poster Company, which began in 1929 and closed last year, will live on at the Maryland Institute College of Art . MICA announced Friday that it would acquire approximately 75 percent of Globe's collection — about 5,000 letterpress illustrations, many of them hand-carved; 350 drawers of type; and original posters Globe created for the likes of James Brown and Frank Zappa. It was one of the country's largest makers of posters in this form.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014
Jay Gould first got his hands on a camera when he was 6 years old, and he describes those first shots as "terrible. " [I] mostly captured roll after roll containing pictures of flashes on aquarium glass," said Gould, 31, who lives in Hampden. "I'm a geek and suspect that my early love of cameras was purely because it had a button and a lens that moved in and out. Things have changed, of course. Gould took his first photography class at age 16 and "finally committed to the medium" when he was almost done with college.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
For nearly two centuries, the Maryland Institute College of Art has been known for training painters, sculptors and fashion designers. But in May, MICA broadened its course offerings, and it is preparing to confer its first master's degrees on about 200 students planning careers in fields ranging from engineering to public health to computer science. The next step: an MBA program that will start next fall and provide classroom instruction at both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's Carey School of Business.
NEWS
By Mikita Brottman | September 29, 2014
I was close to 40 when I discovered how love really feels. The object of my affection was a French bulldog, sold to us as Oliver and rechristened Grisby. His color was officially designated "fawn piebald," which meant he had very pretty markings of light brown and white, about half of each. His fur was short and soft, and his large, expressive ears were light brown on the back, dark pink inside and could seem almost translucent in the sunlight. His mouth was wide and when he trotted along with his pink tongue hanging out, it formed a permanent smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The girl in the tire swing is swaying above North Avenue, sneakers pointing to a traffic light. A block away, the Natty Boh guy and the Utz girl speed away on their wedding day, cans trailing behind their car. And then there's Cupid, aiming an arrow at the street. Above him float the words, "I loved more. " The works of artist Reed Bmore look like line drawings come to life. The 22-year-old shapes sculptures from metal wire, then hangs them on light poles and traffic light cables.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Brockett Horne and her husband, Chris Tesluk, say they chose their city home with the flip of a coin. "Chris works in College Park and I teach at MICA; we ended up choosing Baltimore over D.C.," says Horne, a 40-year-old graphic artist. "We wanted an old house and close to a park. The city suits us … there is so much going on. " The couple purchased a three-story Butchers Hill rowhouse near Patterson Park in 2008 for $182,000. A former barbershop, it hadn't been occupied in 20 years.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The Maryland Institute College of Art announced Wednesday that it will launch a master's program in filmmaking and will run it out of a historic Station North theater that will be home to both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's film programs. The master of fine arts in filmmaking program will begin in fall 2015 and be led by Patrick Wright, who co-produced the 2010 Oscar-winning short documentary, "Music by Prudence," and other films on HIV/AIDS, clergy sexual abuse, and political commentator Ann Coulter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Grumblings seemed few as the 16th Maryland Film Festival wrapped up Sunday, having weathered a forced relocation to North Avenue and other nearby areas. "I've been really enjoying it," cinephile Greg Golinski said Saturday, about halfway through his planned 12-film visit to the festival. The event brought 50 feature films, 10 shorts programs, dozens of filmmakers and thousands of film lovers to Baltimore for the weekend. "Integrating it more into Station North, it's been fun," Golinski said of the move.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Adjunct faculty members at the Maryland Institute College of Art voted to unionize this week, creating the first union representing part-time faculty members at any four-year college in the state. The MICA adjuncts began organizing in March amid dissatisfaction with what some lecturers called shaky job security and insufficient wages. Mailed-in ballots were tallied at the board's Baltimore office Tuesday by a representative of the National Labor Relations Board, with witnesses from MICA's administration and the part-time faculty committee observing the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2010
The making of the Oscar-nominated movie "Music by Prudence" is a tale of two schools, one in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and one in Baltimore. A favorite for best short documentary at tonight's Academy Awards, this 33-minute flight presents an affecting portrait of its tough, gifted title character, the singer-songwriter in a band of disabled youths at the King George VI School & Centre for Children With Physical Disabilities in Bulawayo. Prudence Mabhena suffers from arthrogryposis, a condition that deforms joints and cost her both her legs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
One hundred years ago, Bohemian-born William Oktavec, a butcher by trade and a would-be artist, arrived in Baltimore from New York with his wife and young son. He set up a grocery shop at the corner of North Collington and Ashland avenues in the area known as Little Bohemia. During the summer, Oktavec installed a screen on the front door of his business and made it more than an insect deterrent. He painted it with images of the meat and vegetables available inside. Passersby could not see through the wire mesh into the shop, but anyone inside could see out as easily as if the screen were unadorned.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
The vote is in: Maryland Institute College of Art 's part-time faculty have chosen to unionize as Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 500. Two weeks ago, ballots were sent out by the National Labor Relations Board to all members of the part-time faculty. There was one question on the ballot: Should MICA's part-time faculty organize itself as an independent union with the power to negotiate? The ballots arrived at the doorsteps of 350 faculty members. Voters marked the box. They put them in a provided envelope.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Maryland Film Festival, which for the first time this year will not be showing the majority of its films at a single location, will have shuttles transporting moviegoers among its seven venues. Free shuttles will be running about every 10 minutes, festival director Jed Dietz said. The venues include the Maryland Institute College of Art Lazarus Graduate Studio Center, 131 W. North Ave.; the Windup Space, 12 W. North Ave.; University of Baltimore Business Center, 11 W. Mount Royal Ave.; UB Langsdale Auditorium, 1420 Maryland Ave. (entrance off Oliver Street)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.