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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
Miami Vice, the new-millennium movie version of the seminal '80s TV hit, packs hard-grained texture and tingling moods into a bullet-riddled scenario. It sheds the series' famous and influential pastel look and plunges its cast of villains and warriors into the 21st century. Colin Farrell, a brooder with a glint in his eye, doesn't mimic either Don Johnson's heat or his cool as Sonny Crockett: He makes the role his own with an enigmatic volatility that fills the screen. And Jamie Foxx as Crockett's partner, Ricardo Tubbs, gives the franchise a huge upgrade from Philip Michael Thomas.
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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy -Tribune | June 12, 2009
MIAMI - - What's the biggest difference between a character actor and a leading man? "About 15 to 20 million dollars," says veteran actor Luis Guzman. "And a private jet." Guzman knows what he's talking about. Since his feature film debut, in director Robert M. Young's 1977 adaptation of Miguel Pinero's harrowing play Short Eyes, the Puerto Rican-born, New York City-raised actor has appeared in more than 100 movies and TV shows - Miami Vice to Frasier, Boogie Nights to Anger Management, The Limey to Runaway Jury.
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SPORTS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
City fathers and mothers tut-tut about how The Wire bloodied Baltimore's national reputation. If anything, the show thrust the city's urban realities into the minds of thinking viewers everywhere. Baltimore's cops, unlike Miami's, didn't always win, and, McNulty and Stringer excepted, the characters weren't mistaken for models, but at least they knew sidearms and pastels don't mix. Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas' Crockett and Tubbs wouldn't have lasted a Miami minute on the mean streets of West Baltimore.
SPORTS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
City fathers and mothers tut-tut about how The Wire bloodied Baltimore's national reputation. If anything, the show thrust the city's urban realities into the minds of thinking viewers everywhere. Baltimore's cops, unlike Miami's, didn't always win, and, McNulty and Stringer excepted, the characters weren't mistaken for models, but at least they knew sidearms and pastels don't mix. Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas' Crockett and Tubbs wouldn't have lasted a Miami minute on the mean streets of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | August 6, 2006
While the dialogue in the Miami Vice movie can be incomprehensible at times, one term sticks out: "go-fast boats." In the film, based on the 1980s TV series that made wearing pastel suits look cool, detectives Sonny Crockett (Colin Farrell) and Ricardo Tubbs (Jamie Foxx) try to infiltrate an international illegal drug operation. The detectives, posing as bad guys, use ultra-slick powerboats to take "the load" ( the drugs) to Miami. There is much chatter about the need to use go-fast boats for the job. I hadn't heard the term before and wondered what a go-fast is. And how fast one goes.
FEATURES
August 4, 2006
THE NEXT QUESTION Miami Vice was all the rage in the '80s. How does Michael Mann's movie version stack up against the hit TV show? Please send your thoughts in a brief note with your name, city and daytime phone number (and Such a Critic in the memo field) to arts@baltsun.com. We'll publish the best answers.
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By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
With the synth pop chords of Phil Collins as a backdrop, the Miami Vice pilot in 1984 announced it was not a typical television show. That first episode featured Collins' hit song "In the Air Tonight," setting a haunting mood as a dark sedan rolled through the streets of Miami. Over the next five years, songs by dozens of popular and emerging artists provided the show with an extra layer of depth and meaning, and made a TV show feel more like a movie. Featured artists included Willie Nelson, Tina Turner, Bryan Adams, Billy Idol, Cyndi Lauper and Peter Gabriel.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
24 SEASON FIVE -- Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment -- $59.98 The anti-terrorist thriller enjoyed its largest audience ever last season as Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland) returned to Los Angeles and CTU after 18 months living on the run under assumed identities. Certainly, no other series got off to a bigger bang than 24 did with the assassination of former President David Palmer (Dennis Haysbert) in the opening seconds. The season also ended with a nifty twist, with Bauer being kidnapped by Chinese agents for his all-but-forgotten role in a killing at China's U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
NATIONAL Boston's Big Dig chief resigns The chief of the agency overseeing Boston's Big Dig resigned Thursday under pressure from the governor, two weeks after falling concrete crushed a woman to death in her car. pg 3a Bolton fights for approval America's combative United Nations ambassador John Bolton launched a second campaign to win full congressional approval yesterday, insisting that he had done his best to work with others to advance our national...
ENTERTAINMENT
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 10, 2006
Dead Rising Capcom [Xbox 360] Rated M Malls are cool places. You know it, we know it, Kevin Smith knows it. You could stay in a mall 24/7 and have everything you need right at your fingertips. But you're gonna need weapons. Because if movies and the just-released Dead Rising for the Xbox 360 are any indication, the only time you're gonna be locked in a mall 24/7 comes after zombies rise from the dead and trap you there. You are Frank West, a photojournalist who's gotten a hot tip about weird happenings in a Colorado town (not South Park)
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
Ken Tucker, Entertainment Weekly's editor-at-large and music critic for NPR's Fresh Air With Terry Gross, wasn't sure he had picked the right subject when he set out to chronicle Scarface Nation: The Ultimate Gangster Movie and How It Changed America (St. Martin's Press). "Scarface wasn't my favorite Brian De Palma movie," he says on the phone from his home in suburban Philadelphia. "I liked Blow Out a lot better." With Al Pacino acquiring a deep tan and adopting a Desi Arnaz accent as the Cuban-American drug lord Tony Montana, who believes that if you have guts in America "the World is Yours," the movie was treated, for my money with good reason, as a bloated, over-hyped event when it premiered in 1983.
NEWS
By Victoria Brownworth and Victoria Brownworth,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2008
Legally Dead by Edna Buchanan Simon & Schuster / 359 pages / $26 Edna Buchanan knows crime. During her 18 years heading the police beat for the Miami Herald, she won a Pulitzer Prize and George Polk Award for lifetime achievement in journalism. When she retired from reporting and took up mystery writing, critical acclaim followed. Among her 17 books, Buchanan has published eight novels in the Britt Montero series. Montero, a Cuban-American reporter for a Miami newspaper, is 32 and single.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | June 24, 2008
I live in one of those good neighborhoods, where what obviously was the sound of gunshots - sharp, rapid-fire bursts - woke me around 2:40 Sunday morning, and yet still I thought: firecrackers. It's not so much denial as a lulling and not-unreasonable sense of security, born of the fact that I basically live more in Anne Tyler's Baltimore than David Simon's. When we grumble among ourselves in Federal Hill about crime, it's largely about break-ins and vandalism and the occasional, if still alarming, iPod grab or street mugging.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
24 SEASON FIVE -- Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment -- $59.98 The anti-terrorist thriller enjoyed its largest audience ever last season as Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland) returned to Los Angeles and CTU after 18 months living on the run under assumed identities. Certainly, no other series got off to a bigger bang than 24 did with the assassination of former President David Palmer (Dennis Haysbert) in the opening seconds. The season also ended with a nifty twist, with Bauer being kidnapped by Chinese agents for his all-but-forgotten role in a killing at China's U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
Robert Ward has established a national reputation with novels such as Red Baker and his latest, Four Kinds of Rain, and through his work in the television series Hill Street Blues and Miami Vice, but he has never forgotten his roots in the Baltimore area and the formative period while he was a student at Towson State College. When Ward, who was born in Baltimore in the mid-1940s, was growing up in Govans and Northwood, he never thought he would go to college. "Nobody in my family had gone to college, and my parents didn't think I was all that much of a student, so I hadn't even applied to college," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 10, 2006
Dead Rising Capcom [Xbox 360] Rated M Malls are cool places. You know it, we know it, Kevin Smith knows it. You could stay in a mall 24/7 and have everything you need right at your fingertips. But you're gonna need weapons. Because if movies and the just-released Dead Rising for the Xbox 360 are any indication, the only time you're gonna be locked in a mall 24/7 comes after zombies rise from the dead and trap you there. You are Frank West, a photojournalist who's gotten a hot tip about weird happenings in a Colorado town (not South Park)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 1, 2001
"Big Apple," a new cop drama from one of the creators of "NYPD Blue," debuts tonight with a pilot full of sound and fury registering almost nothing on the emotional scale. The hour is filled with: tons of tough cop talk; the blood-splattered body of a woman; a particularly grisly hanging; a Russian mob hit; a dogged murder investigation; semi-clad female dancers sliding up and down poles at a strip club; and all sorts of backstage intrigue and double-dealing by FBI investigators and their supervisors.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 1996
The first 10 seconds of tonight's premiere of "Nash Bridges" tell you almost everything you need to know about the CBS series -- without a word of dialogue.Frame one: the San Francisco skyline at night. Frame two: a silver-plated handgun. Frame three: a long, full-screen closeup of Don Johnson's face bathed in neon.You have to admit Johnson does look fine in neon, and this is one intelligently crafted cop show. It toys with Johnson's messy-life, naughty, Southern-boy tabloid persona and appropriates the 1980s television iconography of his Sonny Crockett character from "Miami Vice."
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | August 6, 2006
While the dialogue in the Miami Vice movie can be incomprehensible at times, one term sticks out: "go-fast boats." In the film, based on the 1980s TV series that made wearing pastel suits look cool, detectives Sonny Crockett (Colin Farrell) and Ricardo Tubbs (Jamie Foxx) try to infiltrate an international illegal drug operation. The detectives, posing as bad guys, use ultra-slick powerboats to take "the load" ( the drugs) to Miami. There is much chatter about the need to use go-fast boats for the job. I hadn't heard the term before and wondered what a go-fast is. And how fast one goes.
FEATURES
August 4, 2006
THE NEXT QUESTION Miami Vice was all the rage in the '80s. How does Michael Mann's movie version stack up against the hit TV show? Please send your thoughts in a brief note with your name, city and daytime phone number (and Such a Critic in the memo field) to arts@baltsun.com. We'll publish the best answers.
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