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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1996
MIAMI -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California is asking the Clinton administration to look into "numerous security breaches" Miami International Airport reported to her by a senior U.S. Customs inspector in Miami.Feinstein, a Democrat, sent a letter Nov. 8 to the Treasury and Transportation secretaries outlining 22 security lapses at the airport allegedly committed by Customs, the Metro-Dade County Aviation Department and the Federal Aviation Administration."Recently, I have become aware of a very disturbing situation regarding the Customs Service's procedures at Miami International Airport," Feinstein wrote to Robert E. Rubin of the Treasury Department and Federico F. Pena of Transportation.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2000
MIAMI - Some folks need snow and Santa to feel it's Christmas. But in some Central American mountain villages or sandy Caribbean islands, a lot more people are depending on William Lora, especially when their stateside relatives implore him to check his holiday list: a schedule of cargo flights. Lora shares more than his girth and his smile with the season's better-known package delivery specialist: He is the Santa of last resort. As the manager of ABS Freight Forwarders at Miami International Airport, Lora is the go-to guy for desperate travelers who discover that many airlines here have strict holiday restrictions on the number of bags and boxes they can take back to the old country.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 31, 1992
MIAMI -- Forty-five Cubans who defected to the United State in an airliner have been released from federal custody after an intense debate in Washington about whether the pilot's diversion of a routine domestic commuter flight violated international hijacking agreements.The Aero-Caribbean airliner landed at Miami International Airport Tuesday after passengers overpowered three crew members during a scheduled flight from Havana to the beach resort of Varadero. The plane's pilot, Carlos Cancio Porcel, was a leader in the defection plan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1999
MIAMI -- The smugglers moved with ease through Miami International Airport and made their way onto American Airlines planes parked at the gates, stashing heroin in coffee containers in the planes' galleys and hiding cocaine and marijuana in suitcases in the baggage holds, a federal indictment filed yesterday charged.Once, they agreed to stash three hand grenades in carry-on baggage.As they went about their illegal business, in plain sight of passengers and airport security officers, federal investigators said, the smugglers did not worry about being caught by the airline.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 19, 1993
MIAMI -- A group of missionaries, peaceful people completing their service in Haiti, landed safely in Miami after their antiquated airplane was hijacked by a Haitian man who seized a hostage and fired a shot in the cabin, authorities said.The incident ended yesterday as well as it could: no injuries, no additional gunfire, hostage released, hijacker crawling meekly to heavily armed officers, the nine passengers and two crewmen safely evacuated at Miami International Airport.The heroes: a pilot who calmly flew a 50-year-old plane while a hijacker held a gun to his head and a hostage who used her faith and serenity "in a counseling fashion" to calm the gunman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1999
MIAMI -- The smugglers moved with ease through Miami International Airport and made their way onto American Airlines planes parked at the gates, stashing heroin in coffee containers in the planes' galleys and hiding cocaine and marijuana in suitcases in the baggage holds, a federal indictment filed yesterday charged.Once, they agreed to stash three hand grenades in carry-on baggage.As they went about their illegal business, in plain sight of passengers and airport security officers, federal investigators said, the smugglers did not worry about being caught by the airline.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1996
MIAMI -- Helicopters hovered over the scorched swampland and recovery workers dodged alligators to dive into the muck. But the Everglades, desolate and mysterious, gave up only a few clues yesterday about the jet that disappeared into the mire Saturday afternoon, killing 109 people and leaving almost no trace.Local and federal officials gave up any hope of rescuing survivors from ValuJet Flight 592 and changed the name of the mission to "recovery." Then they set about trying to figure out how to find the plane -- or pieces of it -- in the swamp and pull its victims free.
NEWS
By Teresa Smith and Teresa Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- At Biscayne National Park near Florida's southern tip, silence rules.In this nether world of empty mangrove islands and brackish water, of twisted paths and gnarled roots that branch and splinter like nerve cells, the silence is broken only by the whoosh of a pelican diving for food, or the piercing cry of a startled egret.But the park's quiet may soon give way to the sound of jet planes if Miami-Dade County is allowed to build a commercial airport at an abandoned Air Force base two miles away.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2000
MIAMI - Some folks need snow and Santa to feel it's Christmas. But in some Central American mountain villages or sandy Caribbean islands, a lot more people are depending on William Lora, especially when their stateside relatives implore him to check his holiday list: a schedule of cargo flights. Lora shares more than his girth and his smile with the season's better-known package delivery specialist: He is the Santa of last resort. As the manager of ABS Freight Forwarders at Miami International Airport, Lora is the go-to guy for desperate travelers who discover that many airlines here have strict holiday restrictions on the number of bags and boxes they can take back to the old country.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Before a crowd of wagging tails and wet noses, the U.S. Department of Agriculture honored some of its best workers yesterday: the Beagle Brigade, the airport dogs that sniff out food being smuggled into the country.For a decade now, the USDA's beagles have been finding smuggled food that could be carrying plant or animal diseases. Yesterday, the department honored their service -- and seldom have federal workers seemed so frisky.Abbott, the friendly dog who works at Miami International Airport, licked the face of Agriculture Secretary-designate Dan Glickman.
NEWS
By Teresa Smith and Teresa Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- At Biscayne National Park near Florida's southern tip, silence rules.In this nether world of empty mangrove islands and brackish water, of twisted paths and gnarled roots that branch and splinter like nerve cells, the silence is broken only by the whoosh of a pelican diving for food, or the piercing cry of a startled egret.But the park's quiet may soon give way to the sound of jet planes if Miami-Dade County is allowed to build a commercial airport at an abandoned Air Force base two miles away.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1996
MIAMI -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California is asking the Clinton administration to look into "numerous security breaches" Miami International Airport reported to her by a senior U.S. Customs inspector in Miami.Feinstein, a Democrat, sent a letter Nov. 8 to the Treasury and Transportation secretaries outlining 22 security lapses at the airport allegedly committed by Customs, the Metro-Dade County Aviation Department and the Federal Aviation Administration."Recently, I have become aware of a very disturbing situation regarding the Customs Service's procedures at Miami International Airport," Feinstein wrote to Robert E. Rubin of the Treasury Department and Federico F. Pena of Transportation.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1996
MIAMI -- Helicopters hovered over the scorched swampland and recovery workers dodged alligators to dive into the muck. But the Everglades, desolate and mysterious, gave up only a few clues yesterday about the jet that disappeared into the mire Saturday afternoon, killing 109 people and leaving almost no trace.Local and federal officials gave up any hope of rescuing survivors from ValuJet Flight 592 and changed the name of the mission to "recovery." Then they set about trying to figure out how to find the plane -- or pieces of it -- in the swamp and pull its victims free.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 19, 1993
MIAMI -- A group of missionaries, peaceful people completing their service in Haiti, landed safely in Miami after their antiquated airplane was hijacked by a Haitian man who seized a hostage and fired a shot in the cabin, authorities said.The incident ended yesterday as well as it could: no injuries, no additional gunfire, hostage released, hijacker crawling meekly to heavily armed officers, the nine passengers and two crewmen safely evacuated at Miami International Airport.The heroes: a pilot who calmly flew a 50-year-old plane while a hijacker held a gun to his head and a hostage who used her faith and serenity "in a counseling fashion" to calm the gunman.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 31, 1992
MIAMI -- Forty-five Cubans who defected to the United State in an airliner have been released from federal custody after an intense debate in Washington about whether the pilot's diversion of a routine domestic commuter flight violated international hijacking agreements.The Aero-Caribbean airliner landed at Miami International Airport Tuesday after passengers overpowered three crew members during a scheduled flight from Havana to the beach resort of Varadero. The plane's pilot, Carlos Cancio Porcel, was a leader in the defection plan.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
Robert Lucian Smith, a retired electrical engineer and consultant, died of cancer Sunday at his Severna Park home. He was 91. Mr. Smith was born in Washington and raised there and in Pine Bluff, Ark. He attended George Washington University and worked for Graham Co., Republic Steel Co. and the former Glenn L. Martin Co. before taking a position with J.E. Greiner Co. in 1944. During his 41-year career, he worked on the construction of both Chesapeake Bay bridges. After retiring in 1985, his consulting work took him to such places as Epcot Center and Miami International Airport in Florida, Logan International Airport in Boston and Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 29, 1991
MIAMI -- A former Panamanian ambassador passed $10 million in bribes to Manuel Antonio Noriega in return for permission to fly nearly 20 tons of cocaine into the United States, a federal prosecutor said yesterday.The disclosure came in U.S. District Court as Ricardo Bilonick, 44, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiring with the deposed Panamanian leader to smuggle cocaine through their country in the mid-1980s.Bilonick, a former diplomat and businessman who holds a law degree from Tulane University, is said to be one of the prosecution's most important witnesses against General Noriega.
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