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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 28, 1995
Mia Farrow is in bed with Frank Sinatra. It is clear that they have just made love. She's looking satisfied, while there is something between a leer and a smile on his face, when Old Blue Eyes leans over her and says, "How did you like it -- my way."The needle goes straight through the red, and the kitsch-o-meter explodes. Forget Madonna, Roseanne, O. J. Simpson and all the rest. Fox offers a watershed moment in docudrama sleaze and kitsch with "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story," which airs at 8 tonight and Thursday on WBFF (Channel 45)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 1, 2007
The American Civil Liberties Union's Film and Free Expression film series concludes tomorrow at the Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., with John Waters' 1974 Female Trouble. Divine stars as Dawn Davenport, and the film follows her downward spiral from juvenile delinquent to death-row denizen. Showtime is noon tomorrow, preceded by a discussion hosted by retired Circuit Court Judge Elsbeth Bothe and attorney Arnold Weiner. Doors open at 10:45 a.m.; free bagels and coffee are included. Tickets are $6. Encore showings are set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday, with tickets priced at $8. Information: thecharles.
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By THE HARTFORD (CONN.) COURANT | May 1, 2007
Our T-shirts will read, the `Genocide Olympics?' The question mark is there because we're still hoping that China will come around and do the right thing. But we're not giving up until they do." - MIA FARROW, actress and activist, on a new campaign to pressure the Chinese government into action on the crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan, a country where China is a big investor; Beijing is hosting the 2008 Summer Games
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June 1, 2007
Fresh from his fight over Iraq war spending, President Bush has been busy this week at the more constructive task of burnishing his humanitarian credentials. He's stepping up pressure on Sudan to halt the genocide in Darfur; proposing to double funding for global AIDS programs to $30 billion over five years, and installing at the World Bank a skilled negotiator knowledgeable in these and many related issues. And yet Mr. Bush's positive initiatives remain crippled by the global ill will engendered by America's pre-emptive attack on Iraq.
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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 12, 1993
Woody Allen and Mia Farrow are due in a Manhattan courtroom today for combat over the kids.Mr. Allen appears at a teensy disadvantage after Judge Elliot Wilk dressed down his side last Friday for media courting.He said Mr. Allen's lawyers "go out, either you or your surrogates, . . . and hold press conferences and put your own spin on [the case] . . . If you think it will influence me, it will not; except that it will have a negative effect."
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By Jack Kroll and Jack Kroll,Newsweek | August 25, 1992
Amid a bombardment of tabloid missiles and an outpouring of accusations and counteraccusations, Woody Allen decided to talk with Newsweek about his relationship with Mia Farrow, with her children and his, and with Soon-Yi. He also responded to the accusations of abuse of his adopted daughter Dylan. Following is an excerpt from the three and a half hour interview in his Fifth Avenue penthouse apartment.Q: The question most people are concerned about is Mia Farrow's charge that you sexually molested Dylan.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 28, 1995
The latest and, with luck, last celebrity TV biography of the season begins tonight, and concludes tomorrow night, on Fox, when the Mia Farrow-Woody Allen relationship is dissected in "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story." For airing such a smarmy and tacky miniseries, the network ought to atone by issuing a two-word public apology: Mia culpa.* "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story" (8-10 p.m., Channel 45) -- Part 1 of 2. It's called "The Mia Farrow Story," but, except for about 15 brief flashbacks spread over the drama's four hours, this really is "The Mia Farrow and Woody Allen Story."
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 2, 1995
All of NBC's shows but "Friends" are in repeats tonight -- but that's still no reason to watch "Love and Betrayal: The Mia Farrow Story."* "Mad About You" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- The temperature in the Buckmans' apartment provides several different readings -- depending upon who is interpreting the heatedness of the couple's intimate activities. NBC.* "Extreme" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2) -- Which do you remember the most about Super Bowl XXIX: the score, the ABC program that followed it, or the Pepsi commercial with the Coke driver being thrown through a window?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
The Ex doesn't have a ghost of a chance: It plays like an ex-movie. Maybe in some early stage, it was alive. But now it clanks on screen like Marley's Ghost. When the script sold, it must have contained some exploration of the farcical premise: A married couple reaching crisis-point after the birth of their first child. That clicked comedically in Flirting With Disaster (1996). And this movie takes it in potentially fresh directions only to dead-end in lame-o jokes. The Ex (MGM) Starring Zach Braff, Amanda Peet, Jason Bateman, Charles Grodin, Mia Farrow.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 12, 2007
Arthur and the Invisibles tries way too hard. The creatures at its heart -- the Invisibles, who aren't invisible at all, just very, very small -- are blandly animated, with expressionless faces and precious little warmth. To compensate, the filmmakers over-accessorize the tiny creatures adding so many details, from beards to armor, that it becomes distracting. And the story, of a boy who shrinks himself down to their size and ends up being a hero of both the world he came from and the world he's visiting, mistakes frenzy for wit. There's always something going on, but it's often hard to figure why or to what end. Arthur and the Invisibles (Weinstein Co.)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
The Ex doesn't have a ghost of a chance: It plays like an ex-movie. Maybe in some early stage, it was alive. But now it clanks on screen like Marley's Ghost. When the script sold, it must have contained some exploration of the farcical premise: A married couple reaching crisis-point after the birth of their first child. That clicked comedically in Flirting With Disaster (1996). And this movie takes it in potentially fresh directions only to dead-end in lame-o jokes. The Ex (MGM) Starring Zach Braff, Amanda Peet, Jason Bateman, Charles Grodin, Mia Farrow.
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By THE HARTFORD (CONN.) COURANT | May 1, 2007
Our T-shirts will read, the `Genocide Olympics?' The question mark is there because we're still hoping that China will come around and do the right thing. But we're not giving up until they do." - MIA FARROW, actress and activist, on a new campaign to pressure the Chinese government into action on the crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan, a country where China is a big investor; Beijing is hosting the 2008 Summer Games
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 12, 2007
Arthur and the Invisibles tries way too hard. The creatures at its heart -- the Invisibles, who aren't invisible at all, just very, very small -- are blandly animated, with expressionless faces and precious little warmth. To compensate, the filmmakers over-accessorize the tiny creatures adding so many details, from beards to armor, that it becomes distracting. And the story, of a boy who shrinks himself down to their size and ends up being a hero of both the world he came from and the world he's visiting, mistakes frenzy for wit. There's always something going on, but it's often hard to figure why or to what end. Arthur and the Invisibles (Weinstein Co.)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
The separation of church and state has grown ever-fuzzier in our civic life. Before things get even further out of hand, I'd like to propose a separation of church and state in our horror movies. I don't mean religion; good and evil, heaven and hell, souls saved and savaged are at the core of horror fiction. But when moviemakers exploit church traditions to give their ghouls and goblins higher tone, the holiness rings hollow. And few combinations are as unsavory as sanctimony and sensationalism.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 17, 2003
Sure, they made mistakes, some more serious than others. Who hasn't? Sunny Jacobs didn't object when her husband, the father of her two children, went to Florida to close a drug deal. Gary Gauger waited until morning to notify the police that his elderly parents were missing. As a teen-ager, Kerry Max Cook landed in jail twice for minor scrapes with the law. But their missteps didn't justify what followed. Jacobs, Gauger and Cook didn't deserve to spend decades on death row, convicted of murders they didn't commit.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 19, 2002
One of the happiest byproducts of the explosion in made-for-cable-television movies is the forum it offers for actresses of a certain age to keep working in featured roles. Hollywood is still far too willing to celebrate youth over talent, but made-for-cable movies like Lifetime's The Secret Life of Zoey help right the balance. The title role of Zoey Carter in this story of middle-class, suburban, teen addiction to prescription drugs is played by Julia Whelan (Once and Again), one of television's most talented young stars.
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By Los Angeles Times Staff writer Casi H. Clocker contributed to this report | August 24, 1992
All of a sudden, Woody Allen's 1979 movie "Manhattan" is a hot rental in the home-video market.The reason is obvious. His affair with Mia Farrow's adopted daughter is the biggest entertainment-industry scandal -- and the favorite gossip topic -- since Pee-wee Herman creator Paul Reubens' arrest last summer. The "Manhattan" tale, to some degree, mirrors Mr. Allen's current trauma.He stars as a comedy writer having an affair with a high school girl, played by Mariel Hemingway. The plot thickens when he dumps his teen-age flame in favor of a neurotic writer (Diane Keaton)
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By ROGER SIMON | April 17, 1995
Simon Says:I'm sorry, but when a person is wearing a nose ring, I can't look anywhere else.*The definition of an intellectual in America is someone who has never taped "Baywatch."*People who like anchovies always marry people who don't and they fight over pizzas for the rest of their lives.*A factoid I read but don't believe: "The average woman sends 17 birthday cards a year and the average man sends 10."Maybe in Hallmark's dreams.*Inquiring Minds Want to Know: Two weeks ago, O. J. Simpson was ordered to switch his seat at the defense table.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
Tonight, TNT devotes its late-evening programming to Dorothy Stratten, the one-time Playboy playmate whose fate made for one of the more tragic stories of the early 1980s."
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By ROGER SIMON | April 17, 1995
Simon Says:I'm sorry, but when a person is wearing a nose ring, I can't look anywhere else.*The definition of an intellectual in America is someone who has never taped "Baywatch."*People who like anchovies always marry people who don't and they fight over pizzas for the rest of their lives.*A factoid I read but don't believe: "The average woman sends 17 birthday cards a year and the average man sends 10."Maybe in Hallmark's dreams.*Inquiring Minds Want to Know: Two weeks ago, O. J. Simpson was ordered to switch his seat at the defense table.
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