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By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | May 26, 1992
We've known for a long time that it prevents scurvy and is important for the healthy functioning of all mucus membranes in our bodies.Now mounting evidence suggests (but doesn't prove) that vitamin C may play a role in preventing many kinds of cancers, hardening of the arteries, cataracts and birth defects, as well as reducing high blood pressure and common cold symptoms.The Environmental Nutrition (EN) newsletter points out that on any given day, fewer than 50 percent of Americans consume 60 mg of vitamin C, the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
Helmuth Martin Gustav "Ace" Heise, founder and developer of Western Maryland's Will O' the Wisp and Wisp Ski and Golf resorts, died of heart failure Aug. 11 at Garrett County Memorial Hospital. He was 81. Mr. Heise, the son of German immigrant parents, was born and raised in Pittsburgh. He was a graduate of Turtle Creek High School. Mr. Heise first visited Deep Creek Lake with his parents and sister in the late 1930s, when they stayed at Will O' the Wisp, a summer camp with 23 batten-and-board cabins built by Dr. Thurl Bullard, a Garrett County dentist.
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FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | April 7, 1992
When my kids were growing up, I made the best darn spaghetti sauce in town.Studded with garlic and onions, redolent of basil, oregano and thyme, warmed by cayenne, and laced with anise seed, it was a far cry from my mother's red tomato sauce with salt and pepper.And a lot more work.So with an empty nest and a busy career, I made the switch -- and began indulging in the higher-cost but more time-effective varieties beginning to crowd my grocer's shelves.I was delighted to find a quick avenue to my favorite non-fat entree.
NEWS
October 11, 2007
Virginia M. G. Street, former executive director of the Harford County Red Cross and a World War II veteran, died Monday of heart failure at Forest Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center. The Bel Air resident was 85. Born Virginia M. Gowan and raised in Cattaraugus, N.Y., she moved to San Francisco after graduating from high school to be with a sister. After Pearl Harbor, she moved to Buffalo, N.Y., where she worked in a General Motors plant, said her son, William Alton Street of Fallston.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 4, 1994
Metallgesellschaft AG's former head of U.S. refining and marketing filed a $500 million lawsuit in Baltimore federal court alleging he was wrongly fired in the wake of oil-trading losses last year.The suit by Arthur Benson, who was dismissed Feb. 4, also includes accusations of libel, slander and defamation in connection with statements by executives of the German mining and metals company that he breached his duty.Mr. Benson charged that he was held "personally responsible for losses" totaling about $1 billion at Metallgesellschaft and the company's principal U.S. unit, Metallgesellschaft Corp.
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | March 12, 1997
In last week's recipe for African-spiced broccoli and cauliflower salad, the amount of broccoli was inadvertently deleted. The correct amount is 3/4 cup.The Sun regrets the error.The cruciferous vegetables of winter make robust salads that are good for you and flavorful. The problem with dark green vegetables like broccoli and Swiss chard is that they're so nutritious so much so, you can't believe how delicious they can be. Even their family name, Cruciferae, sounds daunting, as if they could help prevent diseases.
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 10, 1993
If you rely on Parke-Davis' Nitrostat to relieve severe heart pains, health officials say it is safe to use alternative nitroglycerin products while that brand remains scarce.Dr. Roger Blumenthal of the Johns Hopkins Henry Ciccarone Preventive Cardiology Center said that the temporary shortage of 0.4 mg nitroglycerin pills from the nation's leading provider is temporary. setback. Nitroglycerin is widely used to improve blood flow to the heart."People will be able to use 0.3 mg tablets or nitroglycerin patches and sprays, which are just as effective," Dr. Blumenthal said.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | July 19, 1994
`TC Bones make their greatest gains in calcium storage beginning at age 11. They get increasingly stronger and peak by age 20, although important smaller gains can be made through the 30s.While it's all downhill from there, adequate calcium can minimize bone loss and reduce osteoporosis risk in later life.But how much calcium do you really need to have the strongest possible bones at every age?In June, the National Institutes of Health sponsored a consensus conference on Optimal Calcium Intake.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | October 23, 1990
Calcium supplementation reduced bone loss in post-menopausal women, a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated.But before you rush to the pharmacy to restock your pill supply, read on.Significant outcomes of the study were:*Adequate calcium intake did retard bone loss in some women who were six or more years past menopause.*Only women with very low calcium intakes were helped by supplementation.The current Recommended Dietary Allowance for calcium for women over 25 years old is 800 mg per day.Women in this study were divided into two groups.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1996
Reduced sodium diets are yet another weapon in the war against osteoporosis.Researchers have often shown that eating more sodium increases calcium lost in urine. But does that mean calcium is being lost from bones? Yes, according to researchers at the University of Western Australia.Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter reports that the two-year study of 100 postmenopausal women found that those who ate the most sodium lost the most bone from their hips and ankles. So they were at greater risk for fractures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [AARON CHESTER] | September 27, 2007
British Car show The lowdown -- MG's on the Rocks British Car Show and Parts Market aims to bring together hundreds of MG and British car owners and enthusiasts from the Mid-Atlantic region. Expect numerous vendors of new and used parts, a selection of cars for sale, expertise on technical problems, and food and drinks. Open to all British car owners, the show will also feature an awards presentation and dash plaques for all preregistered cars. If you go -- MG's on the Rocks begins at 9 a.m. Saturday at Rocks State Park, 4-H Camp, Harford County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 21, 2005
The Rev. Lydia M.G. Starks, a cosmetologist-turned-pastor who founded Fellowship Baptist Temple Church, died of pancreatitis Thursday, her 89th birthday, at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. She was a longtime Forest Park resident. She was born Lydia Minerva Green in Paterson, N.J., one of 11 children of the Rev. Joshua Henry Green, who moved his family to Baltimore when he established New Metropolitan Baptist Church. During the 1930s, Mrs. Starks studied cosmetology at George Washington Carver Vocational High School and was a night school graduate of Douglass High School.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
The Maryland Poison Center warned yesterday that the packaging and label of a new form of Children's Tylenol might confuse parents and lead them to accidentally give their youngsters a double dose, risking liver damage if the mistake is repeated over time. At issue in the warning is the 80-milligram form of Children's Tylenol Meltaways. The flavored, chewable tablets, intended for children ages 2 to 6, come in "blister packs" - cardboard sheets holding tablets sealed in plastic. Poison Center officials said that while some of the blister packs contain one tablet correctly labeled 80 mg, others - also labeled 80 mg - contain two 80 mg tablets, or a total of 160 mg. The two-tablet packs were intended as a convenience to parents who might be instructed to give their children 160 mg. But Poison Center officials thought the labeling was "slightly confusing."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 16, 2005
LONDON - Britain's last big automaker, bankrupt MG Rover, will be broken up and sold and 5,000 of its workers dismissed, the company's administrators said yesterday in announcing its collapse. Hopes to save the ailing company ran out yesterday after Shanghai Automotive Industry Corp., which had seemed interested in saving Rover, said it would not buy the British automaker. Shanghai Automotive backed away in recent weeks after discovering the extent of Rover's losses and difficulties. MG Rover Group is controlled by Phoenix Venture Holdings.
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | March 12, 1997
In last week's recipe for African-spiced broccoli and cauliflower salad, the amount of broccoli was inadvertently deleted. The correct amount is 3/4 cup.The Sun regrets the error.The cruciferous vegetables of winter make robust salads that are good for you and flavorful. The problem with dark green vegetables like broccoli and Swiss chard is that they're so nutritious so much so, you can't believe how delicious they can be. Even their family name, Cruciferae, sounds daunting, as if they could help prevent diseases.
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | November 20, 1996
Of all the meals that you'll serve during the holidays, Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners present the biggest challenges. People cherish traditions, so these dinners need to feature lots of familiar, comfortable fare, such as turkey with all the trimmings.However, with the advent of healthy eating, a new dilemma has (( arisen: Can these dinners be plentiful yet still be light? Absolutely, as the menu here proves.Southern corn bread dressingMakes 10 servingsspeckled corn bread1 (12-ounce)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
The Maryland Poison Center warned yesterday that the packaging and label of a new form of Children's Tylenol might confuse parents and lead them to accidentally give their youngsters a double dose, risking liver damage if the mistake is repeated over time. At issue in the warning is the 80-milligram form of Children's Tylenol Meltaways. The flavored, chewable tablets, intended for children ages 2 to 6, come in "blister packs" - cardboard sheets holding tablets sealed in plastic. Poison Center officials said that while some of the blister packs contain one tablet correctly labeled 80 mg, others - also labeled 80 mg - contain two 80 mg tablets, or a total of 160 mg. The two-tablet packs were intended as a convenience to parents who might be instructed to give their children 160 mg. But Poison Center officials thought the labeling was "slightly confusing."
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | November 20, 1996
Of all the meals that you'll serve during the holidays, Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners present the biggest challenges. People cherish traditions, so these dinners need to feature lots of familiar, comfortable fare, such as turkey with all the trimmings.However, with the advent of healthy eating, a new dilemma has (( arisen: Can these dinners be plentiful yet still be light? Absolutely, as the menu here proves.Southern corn bread dressingMakes 10 servingsspeckled corn bread1 (12-ounce)
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1996
Reduced sodium diets are yet another weapon in the war against osteoporosis.Researchers have often shown that eating more sodium increases calcium lost in urine. But does that mean calcium is being lost from bones? Yes, according to researchers at the University of Western Australia.Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter reports that the two-year study of 100 postmenopausal women found that those who ate the most sodium lost the most bone from their hips and ankles. So they were at greater risk for fractures.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
A recent study linking high dietary iron intake to heart attacks caused quite a stir, but needs to be kept in perspective.Four more recent surveys did not show this connection. Clearly, the jury is still out on this issue, and it may be years before we have reliable answers. In the meantime, what's a reasonable person to do? We have to make food choices that, hopefully, improve our health and reduce our risks. And the problem is compounded because iron needs are different for different people.
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