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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,sun reporter | September 28, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- With Sen. Barack Obama coming up from Washington, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings coming down from Baltimore and Rep. Albert R. Wynn coming over from Prince George's County, the rally yesterday was intended to demonstrate the black support behind Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin for U.S. Senate. But former congressman Kweisi Mfume took the opportunity to sound a warning: If Democrats continue to present slates dominated by white men, it will cost the party at the polls. "When the Democratic ticket for statewide office in 2006 still looks like the one from 1956, we have a problem," Mfume told several hundred at the University of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | September 20, 2006
Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin was endorsed by several of Baltimore's most influential black politicians yesterday - officials who had backed his rival in the Democratic primary for Senate - during an event designed to communicate his embrace by the city's African-American leaders. But one key figure was missing: former NAACP chief Kweisi Mfume, whom Cardin defeated in Tuesday's contest. "We'll be together very shortly," Cardin said after the midday rally in front of City Hall, referring to Mfume.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | September 16, 2006
Democrat Kweisi Mfume formally conceded to U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin yesterday, saying he did not think he could gain enough votes with the counting of absentee and provisional ballots to overtake his rival in the race for U.S. Senate. In a written statement issued by his campaign three days after the primary election, Mfume said he would support Cardin, the 10-term congressman, in the general election against Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele. Mfume phoned Cardin at noon yesterday to congratulate him, according to a campaign spokesman.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 16, 2006
Amanda Rodrigues-Smith's summer of idealism came to an end late Tuesday night, when Kweisi Mfume lost his bid to be the next U.S. senator from Maryland. Rodrigues-Smith worked as a volunteer for Mfume's campaign. From her dorm room at the University of North Carolina, where she's a junior political science and journalism major, she expressed disappointment that the candidate of her choice didn't win. So disappointed, she said, that she just might cast her ballot for Lt. Gov. Michael Steele in the general election.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
Even though the general election campaign has begun in earnest, Democratic Senate candidate Kweisi Mfume said yesterday that he won't concede to U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin until all provisional and absentee votes are counted. Despite Mfume's kind words for Cardin after Tuesday's primary election, he also declined yesterday to throw his firm support behind the Democratic congressman, adding that he had phoned the Republican Party's nominee, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, on Wednesday to congratulate him for winning his party's primary.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 14, 2006
So which U.S. Senate candidate got the biggest bang for his campaign buck? Not Josh Rales, the millionaire businessman and philanthropist who put up more than $5 million of his own cash in his bid for the Democratic nomination. Capturing about 5 percent of the vote, Rales came in third -- behind seasoned politicians Kweisi Mfume, who took 40 percent of the vote and Benjamin L. Cardin, who won the nomination with 44 percent. Cardin spent about $3.9 million, Mfume about $810,000, according to Aug. 23 figures from the Federal Election Commission, the most recent available.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | September 14, 2006
Hours after his quest for U.S. Senate ended in a narrow defeat in Tuesday's Democratic primary, Kweisi Mfume was faced with a simple question: What next? One of the first possibilities to surface was Baltimore mayor. Mfume, who launched his public career 27 years ago at City Hall, showed Tuesday that he remains influential in Baltimore, winning his hometown by nearly the same margin that Mayor Martin O'Malley posted in his 2003 Democratic primary victory. If O'Malley succeeds in unseating Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in November, City Council President Sheila Dixon will automatically become mayor until the city's 2007 elections.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy and Andrew A. Green and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporters | September 11, 2006
An 18-month campaign was condensed into a sprint of hand-shaking, picnics and speeches yesterday for Maryland's leading Democratic candidates for the U.S. Senate, as they made last-minute appeals for their supporters to vote in tomorrow's primary election. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and former congressman Kweisi Mfume, locked in what most polls show to be a competitive race to be their party's nominee to replace retiring Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, made a dozen campaign stops between them yesterday in what, because of today's anniversary of the Sept.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | September 11, 2006
It was early in the campaign, as Kweisi Mfume remembers it, a private moment shortly after Benjamin L. Cardin joined him in the race for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate. It would be the first time in their long political careers that the old friends and collaborators would be running against each other. "I said to him and Myrna [Cardin's wife], `This is probably the most awkward thing you and I are going to do,'" Mfume recalled. "`But we've got to do it, now that you're in.'" They entered Congress together, the black City Council member from West Baltimore and the Jewish former speaker of the House of Delegates from Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 10, 2006
With an unusually large number of African-American candidates vying for statewide office this year, voters, politicians and political observers are discussing how the topic of race will play out during the campaign season. If former Rep. Kweisi Mfume wins Tuesday's Democratic primary, he will likely face GOP candidate Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, marking a first-ever matchup between black candidates for a Maryland Senate seat. Some political observers hope that contest, coupled with the presence of black candidates Del. Anthony G. Brown (who is assured a spot on the Democratic ticket for lieutenant governor)
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