Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMezzo
IN THE NEWS

Mezzo

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 15, 1995
Cecilia Bartoli, "A Portrait," arias and art songs by Mozart, Rossini, Parisotti, Caccini and others (London 448 300-2); Jennifer Larmore, "Where Shall I Fly," arias by Handel and Mozart, performed with the Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Jesus Lopez-Cobos conducting (Teldec 4509-96800-2)It used to be the case that the great rivalries in divadom were between sopranos, but these two mezzos seem to be changing that. The beauty of their voices, their dramatic abilities and their capacity for breathtaking coloratura have made Bartoli and Larmore perhaps the most exciting female singers in the world, and we can expect them to compete for roles for decades to come.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Vocal recitals are rare enough in Baltimore that even a program of familiar lieder would qualify as a novelty. A program of way-off-the-beaten-path songs? That's beyond cool. Magdalena Kozena, the high-profile, Czech mezzo-soprano, and her equally high-profile accompanist, the Russian-born, Israeli-American pianist Yefim Bronfman, chose a fascinating sample of repertoire for their recital Sunday night presented by the  Shriver Hall Concert Series . Four of the five composers on the bill came from the mainstream, but the works selected for this occasion did not.  In Mussorgsky's song cycle "The Nursery," which evokes the alternately animated, awed and mischievous mindset of a child, Kozena offered an abundance of colorful vocal touches -- even a nose-thumbing gesture for good measure.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | December 12, 2006
Not since Ewa Podles, the contralto powerhouse from Poland, blew the roof off the joint two years ago has the audience for Shriver Hall Concert Series been as jolted by a human voice as it was Sunday night. New York-born mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, whose credits include the 1999 Richard Tucker Award, filled the space with a sound that was exceptionally, excitingly grand in size and vibrancy. You just don't hear voices with that kind of visceral impact every day. Even though the timbre in this case might not be the warmest around, Blythe avoids stridency, even in all-out mode.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
In terms of talent, glamour and wide appeal, few opera singers today rank as high as mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves. No wonder there's quite a buzz at the Peabody Conservatory, where Graves will join the voice faculty in the fall. People are still talking about a master class that Graves gave at the conservatory last September. "She didn't know she was auditioning," said Phyllis Bryn-Julson, the distinguished soprano who chairs the voice department. "It was a phenomenal day for the students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | February 13, 1997
By any standard, Florence Quivar ranks among the greatest and most versatile -- she's as terrific in Mahler as she is in Verdi -- mezzo-sopranos of the last half-century. This wonderful singer -- who is now celebrating the 20th year of her debut at the Metropolitan Opera -- will make a rare Baltimore appearance this Sunday in Morgan State University's Performing Arts Series.Mezzo-soprano Florence Quivar will sing in Murphy Auditorium at Morgan State University at 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $25; for tickets or further information, call (410)
FEATURES
May 27, 2003
The Baltimore Choral Arts Society, conducted by Tom Hall, will perform Beethoven's Missa Solemnis at 8 p.m. Thursday at Meyerhoff Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The soloists are soprano Lisa Daltrius, mezzo Phyllis Pancella, tenor Anthony Dean Griffey and bass Kurt Link. Tickets are $15 to $55. Call 410-783-8000. The Handel Choir of Baltimore, conducted by T. Herbert Dimmock, will perform Verdi's Requiem at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Murphy Fine Arts Center, Morgan State University. The soloists are soprano Ester Hardenberg, mezzo Deidre Palnour, tenor Paul Mow and bass Mark Schnaible.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 20, 1994
Luciano Pavarotti's successor as opera's biggest draw is not balding, fat and homely. In fact, the new King of Opera is a beautiful young Queen.People who know about Cecilia Bartoli are probably smart enough to know they won't be able to get a ticket to her recital of obscure Italian baroque and classical songs in Washington Friday. The Kennedy Center's 2,800 seat Concert Hall was sold out more than six months ago -- as was every other theater the 27-year-old Italian mezzo-soprano is scheduled to visit on her current American tour.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1995
The annual Maryland Vocal Competition has become one of the best tickets in town over the past several seasons.Last Saturday at St. John's College, eight singers -- three sopranos, three mezzos, one tenor and one bass all under the age of 32 and studying in Maryland -- put on a show for judges Ava Shields, Richard Higgins, Loraine Bernstein, Ronald Gretz, Braxton Peters and the dozen other hearty souls who braved the snow and cold out of their love for...
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 4, 1994
The New York City Opera National Company dedicates itself to the task of bringing young talent from the Big Apple's No.TC opera house to the provinces "in old-fashioned bus and truck style," the printed program declares.Last Friday, they bused and trucked to Annapolis to present Puccini's immortal "Madama Butterfly" before a packed house at the U.S. Naval Academy's Alumni Hall. A full week later, I'm still scratching my head trying to figure out what gives with this company.Make no mistake, these were highly pedigreed youngsters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 2000
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3; solo piano works. Arcadi Volodos, pianist. (Sony Classical) Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 may not be quite the Mount Everest that it became in the popular film "Shine," but it remains one of the great challenges in the repertoire. It's not so much the technical challenges involved, though they are certainly considerable. It's more a question of how to turn those challenges into an integral part of the score's extraordinarily intense lyricism, to keep power and poetry in balance.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
Four superb singers took to the stage during the Annapolis Opera's "Concert of Stars," welcoming the crowd to the beginning of the company's 38th season. The stellar performer was Annapolis resident and Metropolitan Opera baritone Jason Stearns, who has recently returned from performing in Oslo, Norway. Opening this program, Stearns delivered a compelling rendition of Umberto Giordano's "Nemico della Patria?" from "Andrea Chenier. " Later, the two-season Met performer sang a riveting "Credo in un Dio crudel" from Giuseppe Verdi's "Otello.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | December 12, 2006
Not since Ewa Podles, the contralto powerhouse from Poland, blew the roof off the joint two years ago has the audience for Shriver Hall Concert Series been as jolted by a human voice as it was Sunday night. New York-born mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, whose credits include the 1999 Richard Tucker Award, filled the space with a sound that was exceptionally, excitingly grand in size and vibrancy. You just don't hear voices with that kind of visceral impact every day. Even though the timbre in this case might not be the warmest around, Blythe avoids stridency, even in all-out mode.
FEATURES
May 27, 2003
The Baltimore Choral Arts Society, conducted by Tom Hall, will perform Beethoven's Missa Solemnis at 8 p.m. Thursday at Meyerhoff Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The soloists are soprano Lisa Daltrius, mezzo Phyllis Pancella, tenor Anthony Dean Griffey and bass Kurt Link. Tickets are $15 to $55. Call 410-783-8000. The Handel Choir of Baltimore, conducted by T. Herbert Dimmock, will perform Verdi's Requiem at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Murphy Fine Arts Center, Morgan State University. The soloists are soprano Ester Hardenberg, mezzo Deidre Palnour, tenor Paul Mow and bass Mark Schnaible.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 26, 2003
Fans of vocal music have a bad habit of wallowing in memories - real or imagined - of the good old days, when great singers roamed the Earth in abundant numbers. Mention any artist today, and these nostalgia nuts invariably reply, "You should have heard so-and-so." But even folks with an uncontrollable fondness for the past would have to admit that the present sounds awfully good whenever Susan Graham sings. Over the past few years, the American mezzo-soprano has moved quickly into the stellar sphere with her gleaming tone, sure technique and inviting personality.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
The musicians of the Columbia Orchestra echoed John Masefield's poetic call to go "down to the seas again," courtesy of a pair of oceanographically charged works by Sir Edward Elgar and contemporary composer Tobias Picker on Saturday night. Sir Edward's Sea Pictures, a lovely orchestral song-cycle for mezzo-soprano, and Picker's The Encantadas, a musical travelogue of the "enchanted" Galapagos Islands employing a text by Herman Melville, dominated the program. Picker, that rarest of breeds -- a modern composer whose works are being embraced with enthusiasm while he is still alive -- was on hand to narrate Melville's ode to shifting winds, vicious currents, dancing penguins, pensive pelicans and giant tortoises that hark back to an age when super-sized amphibians and their reptilian colleagues ruled Earth.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2002
Washington was a hot place to be over the weekend - important premieres by the National Symphony, a recital by nonpareil violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and Kiri Te Kanawa's Washington Opera debut in Samuel Barber's Gothic opera Vanessa. With a psychologically astute, if occasionally overripe, libretto by Gian Carlo Menotti and an unabashedly romantic and brilliantly orchestrated, if occasionally overheated, score, Vanessa makes for a compelling night of music and theater. On Saturday night at the Kennedy Center Opera House, Te Kanawa offered a compelling, incisive portrait of a grande dame wedded to the past who is unexpectedly awakened to feelings long dormant.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 26, 2003
Fans of vocal music have a bad habit of wallowing in memories - real or imagined - of the good old days, when great singers roamed the Earth in abundant numbers. Mention any artist today, and these nostalgia nuts invariably reply, "You should have heard so-and-so." But even folks with an uncontrollable fondness for the past would have to admit that the present sounds awfully good whenever Susan Graham sings. Over the past few years, the American mezzo-soprano has moved quickly into the stellar sphere with her gleaming tone, sure technique and inviting personality.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
The musicians of the Columbia Orchestra echoed John Masefield's poetic call to go "down to the seas again," courtesy of a pair of oceanographically charged works by Sir Edward Elgar and contemporary composer Tobias Picker on Saturday night. Sir Edward's Sea Pictures, a lovely orchestral song-cycle for mezzo-soprano, and Picker's The Encantadas, a musical travelogue of the "enchanted" Galapagos Islands employing a text by Herman Melville, dominated the program. Picker, that rarest of breeds -- a modern composer whose works are being embraced with enthusiasm while he is still alive -- was on hand to narrate Melville's ode to shifting winds, vicious currents, dancing penguins, pensive pelicans and giant tortoises that hark back to an age when super-sized amphibians and their reptilian colleagues ruled Earth.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2001
A successful performance of a Mozart opera requires three things: beautiful, yet agile voices; stylish presentation; and the expressive depth to move from comedy to the most achingly gorgeous melodies ever written - and back again - at a moment's notice. A tall order. But I saw all this and more at last weekend's Annapolis Opera production of Mozart's sparkling "Cosi fan tutte." Beautiful, agile voices could be heard all over the Maryland Hall stage. Soprano Angela Fout and lyric mezzo Lori Hultgren were delights to the ear as Fiordiligi and Dorabella, the sisters engaged to pair of young men brought to life under Braxton Peters' stage direction as a pair of 19th-century midshipmen at the Naval Academy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 2000
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3; solo piano works. Arcadi Volodos, pianist. (Sony Classical) Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 may not be quite the Mount Everest that it became in the popular film "Shine," but it remains one of the great challenges in the repertoire. It's not so much the technical challenges involved, though they are certainly considerable. It's more a question of how to turn those challenges into an integral part of the score's extraordinarily intense lyricism, to keep power and poetry in balance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.