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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
When Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall opened 10 years ago this week, it was the cultural equivalent of Opening Day at Oriole Park: Luminaries from the music world, critics and music lovers streamed into Baltimore to witness the birth of the new $23 million temple of sound.Sergiu Commissiona led the orchestra in a program that offered pianist Leon Fleisher's celebrated return to two-handed performance -- an event that was later broadcast on public television.The building of the concert hall was as important an artistic landmark as exists in this city.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been showing a lot of love for the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the poem Francis Scott Key was inspired to write after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry. The BSO celebrated that anniversary on Sept. 13 during the nationally televised Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six, then kept the theme going for its annual gala, an all-American concert held Saturday night at Meyerhoff Hall. There was a good deal of novelty on the short program (in between dinner and dessert offered for premium gala-goers in a tent set up outside)
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January 8, 1996
Pianist Evgeny Kissin's recital, scheduled for last night at the Meyerhoff Hall, was canceled due to snow. Ticketholders should contact the Meyerhoff box office regarding a rescheduled performance. @
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
  By now, you have surely heard all about the Seattle Symphony's Web-phenomenon -- a viral YouTube clip of the orchestra teaming up with Sir Mix-a-Lot for a version of his 1990s posterior-fixated rap hit "Baby Got Back. " By now, you may also be in counseling after seeing the video. Some folks, among them the ever-readable classical music pooh-bah Norman Lebrecht , have railed mightily against what went down in Seattle. Others see this as a harmless bit of cross-over that can catch the attention of folks who otherwise may never give a symphony orchestra a second thought.
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By Stephen Wigler | October 5, 1995
The Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Wednesday in Meyerhoff Hall promises to be one of the great events of the current season. The orchestra is, of course, one of the six or seven greatest in the world and it has never sounded better than it does under its current music director, Wolfgang Sawallisch. Sawallisch will conduct the kind of program for which he achieved fame long ago: Richard Strauss' mighty "Ein Heldenleben" and Beethoven's Symphony No. 4.Meyerhoff Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are priced at $24-$56.
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By Stephen Wigler | March 27, 1997
Yesterday's edition of Live gave incorrect dates for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's performances of "Carmina Burana" under conductor Sergiu Comissiona. Besides a dress rehearsal Wednesday, the performances are April 3, 4 and 5. Call for information.The Sun regrets the errors.Concerts by the Baltimore Symphony's laureate conductor, Sergiu Comissiona, tend to be events. Comissiona's concerts with the BSO in Meyerhoff Hall this week should be no exception. With soloists Zheng Zhou, baritone, and soprano Janice Chandler, and the Boys of St. David's Choir, Comissiona will conduct two great and contrasting choral works: Poulenc's gloriously sweet and joyous "Gloria" and Orff's barbaric and energetic "Carmina Burana."
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By Stephen Wigler | November 23, 1995
The American pianist Misha Dichter makes his first local appearance in several years this week when he performs Beethoven's First Piano Concerto in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and guest conductor Marek Janowski. The program also includes Schumann's soaring Symphony No. 3 in E-flat (the "Rhenish").Performances take place Friday and Saturday at 8:15 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets are $18-$36 and are available by calling the BSO box office, (410) 783-8000.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Due to what are being described as "unforeseen contractual issues related to the production," the Baltimore Symphony has canceled "Matrix Live," a concert that had been scheduled for July 13 at Meyerhoff Hall as part of the orchestra's summer season. "Matrix Live," which combines a showing of the 1999 Academy Award-winning film with live soundtrack, has been presented by several orchestras in this country and abroad. Patrons who purchased tickets to the BSO event will receive refunds.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
UPDATE: At the end of January, The American Marketing Association - Baltimore presented the BSO with the Marketing Excellence Award for Best Advertising Campaign for this project. Last year, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra launched a marketing campaign aimed at showing the public just how un-snobby its musicians are. Large banners were unveiled on the exterior of Meyerhoff Hall showing players in playful, super-friendly poses. No formal wear, no look-at-how-serious-and-well-trained-I-am shots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop has canceled her scheduled appearances this week with the ensemble. Her mother, a cellist who spent several decades in the New York City Ballet Orchestra, died late last week in upstate New York at the age of 82. BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly will be on the podium for the concerts, which feature the showing of two 1920s Charlie Chaplin films, "The Kid" and "The Idle Class," with...
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra could have included just a little sample of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" to go with its latest program, which includes the overture and incidental music Mendelssohn wrote under the spell of that play. But this is an all-out production, and a beguiling one at that. Created in association with Washington's superb Folger Theatre, the semi-staged presentation, cleverly adapted and directed by Edward Berkeley, provides a generous helping of "Midsummer.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
An emperor and a dictator rule over the latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program, which turns out to be benevolent for us commoners who like noble music-making. Friday night's concert at Meyerhoff Hall was one of the most riveting and unified the BSO has given in the past decade or more. The repeats Saturday and Sunday could get even hotter.  Music director Marin Alsop has paired two meaty works to form something of an epic. Beethoven's evergreen Piano Concerto No. 5 has such scope and presence that, long ago, it acquired the nickname "Emperor.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Few musicians generate the affection that Itzhak Perlman has enjoyed from the public for the better part of four decades. That bond is still going strong, as was evident the moment he made his entrance at the Music Center at Strathmore Thursday night to begin a dual concert with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra as violin soloist and conductor. The sight of the 68-year-old Perlman making his way on crutches to his chair understandably seemed to worry the audience, and the initial, hearty ovation subsided long before he could get situated.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
If the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra were to appoint a principal guest conductor, I wouldn't be surprised to see Yan Pascal Tortelier get the nod. The Frenchman returns regularly to the BSO podium and, just as regularly, gets notable results. He did so again over the weekend, substituting for the originally announced John Storgards, chief conductor of the Helsinki Philharmonic (no explanation was announced for Storgards' non-appearance). On Sunday afternoon at Meyerhoff Hall, Tortelier led an especially potent account of Sibelius' brooding Symphony No. 1. From the opening, there was a palpable tension in the performance that didn't let up for a second.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Baltimore has experienced a bounty of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, among others, in recent days. My favorite experience came Sunday evening when Shriver Hall Concert Series presented the Scharoun Ensemble Berlin, a chamber group comprising (mostly) of members of the famed Berlin Philharmonic. It's always uplifting to be in the presence of musicians who are at the top of their game. Brahms' Clarinet Quintet, a piece infused with twilight, received a performance of commendable sensitivity, where the spaces between phrases emerged as meaningfully as any of the notes.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Russian repertoire was so prevalent and played so passionately during Yuri Temirkanov's tenure at the helm of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra that it seemed to some people that there was no point in touching such music again. I confess I entertained that notion myself for a little while. The tendency to romanticize the Temrikanov years is absolutely understandable, but not all that productive. The world goes on. So does the music. And it sure went on stirringly Friday night at Meyerhoff Hall.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 9, 1993
The program that music director David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed last night in Meyerhoff Hall is essentially the one that they will play in Carnegie Hall next week. The only addition to last night's Mozart's Piano ConcertoThe program that music director David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed last night in Meyerhoff Hall is essentially the one that they will play in Carnegie Hall next week. The only addition to last night's Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 22 and Mahler's Symphony No. 4 will be the world premiere of a short work by George Perle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
UPDATE: At the end of January, The American Marketing Association - Baltimore presented the BSO with the Marketing Excellence Award for Best Advertising Campaign for this project. Last year, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra launched a marketing campaign aimed at showing the public just how un-snobby its musicians are. Large banners were unveiled on the exterior of Meyerhoff Hall showing players in playful, super-friendly poses. No formal wear, no look-at-how-serious-and-well-trained-I-am shots.
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