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NEWS
By RICHARD SEID | July 26, 1994
When the video-cassette war was won by VHS over Sony's Betamax design, Mexico became flooded with Betamaxes. When DDT was banned in the United States, the pesticide was still vigorously marketed in Mexico. If it does not play in the first world, it usually gets dumped in the third.A new case is now becoming too deadly to ignore. When the U.S. Congress voted to ban certain types of deadly assault rifles, their export to Mexico became a lethal certainty. As if on cue, on May 13, Mexican police found an arsenal of 103 AK-47s, assembled from illegally imported parts, in a warehouse in the crime-ridden border city of Tijuana.
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NEWS
By WILLIAM A. ORME JR | May 8, 1991
Miami. -- Though the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement could have a dramatic impact on the U.S. and Mexico, public debate here -- only just stirring -- is likely to be stillborn. If Congress extends President Bush's fast-track negotiating authority by June 1, as anticipated, the treaty could be hammered out behind closed doors and approved by the spring of 1992.The White House and Mexican President Salinas are strongly lobbying for it, but the tide isn't just coming from the top. The North American Free Trade Agreement simply formalizes an ongoing process of North America-wide business-driven integration marked by much freer cross-border trade.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Mexico and the United States have many more important things to worry about than the cuteness or offensiveness of Memin Pinguin. The big-lipped, big-eared, bug-eyed, black-skinned pickaninny cartoon character recently sparked international outrage when it popped up on Mexican postage stamps. It was the biggest uproar between the two nations since, well, the last one. That, you may recall, came when Mexico's President Vicente Fox said that Mexicans take jobs that "not even blacks want to do."
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,Los Angeles Times | June 25, 1994
ORLANDO, Fla. -- His players' legs were heavier than lead, their gasps for air frantic, and Mexican coach Miguel Mejia Baron was worried.Ireland had just scored, cutting Mexico's lead to 2-1 with six minutes to play and sending a jolt of enthusiasm through the Irish faithful at the Citrus Bowl.Baron was facing calamity. To have played two World Cup games and not have won either? Unthinkable. Unpardonable."There are many things that cross your mind in that situation," vTC Baron said. "Strange things happen in your head."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 31, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks posted their first broad decline in six days yesterday amid concern that U.S. assets and corporate profits will suffer if Congress doesn't approve a Mexican loan-guarantee package soon.Shares of aluminum, chemical, paper and steel companies led the retreat as Mexico's predicament compounded concern that rising U.S. interest rates will slow the domestic economy. Many analysts expect the Federal Reserve's policy panel to raise rates when it meets today and tomorrow.Doubts about the Mexican aid plan's passage hurt the stock market because Mexico is the U.S.'s third-largest trading partner.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1994
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- Negotiations to resolve the peasant uprising in the southern state of Chiapas appeared to have bogged down yesterday as rebels pressed their demand for democratic changes in Mexico's political system.Although the talks began only a week ago and had brought quick preliminary agreements on many secondary issues, the government and the rebel Zapatista National Liberation Front both described the negotiations as having reached a crucial juncture."We cannot ignore the interpretation that we are in the most critical part of the accords at this moment," the negotiators said in a joint communique late Saturday.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | November 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton sent legislation creating the world's largest free trade zone to Congress yesterday, after pressuring Mexico into accepting last-minute sweeteners for six U.S. industries, including the powerful sugar industry.Mickey Kantor, the U.S. trade representative, worked the phones until 4 a.m. yesterday to obtain the Mexican concessions.They are designed to lessen special-interest hostility to the controversial North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and help the administration pick up badly needed votes in the House.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
CULIACAN, Mexico -- This city has been so battered by the violence of drug traffickers that most of its people don't feel pain anymore.A month ago a man lay bleeding to death from a gunshot wound outside Dr. Alfonso Corona Sapien's office. He was in his early 20s, Dr. Corona said, and he was barely breathing. Many saw the body, but no one moved to help him.He was only one of 175 people killed here so far this year."It's as if people are walking around in a daze," said the 37-year-old doctor, whose own sister was killed by drug traffickers in 1990.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | December 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Former Tennessee Sen. William E. Brock, who took another step yesterday toward a 1994 Senate race in Maryland, heads a company that collected nearly $1 million from the Mexican government to work for passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement.According to disclosure reports filed with the Justice Department, the Brock Group has received about $3.9 million in fees and expenses from clients in other countries since December 1989, including the governments of Germany, Mexico, Panama and Taiwan.
NEWS
March 7, 1997
CONGRESS may well be on the way to an easy vote to override President Clinton's wise decision to certify Mexico as an ally in the anti-drug war. But among the lawmakers taking this popular position, there will be plenty who hope the president's certain veto will be upheld. Responsibility for a congressionally imposed denial of economic cooperation with Mexico is something the legislative branch is totally unprepared to accept.A good phrase for this is "creative hypocrisy," which is federal drug enforcer Barry McCaffrey's description of the attitude of many Americans toward their southern neighbor -- especially as it relates to the narcotics issue.
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