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NEWS
By Newsday | January 6, 1994
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- Despite a government media effort to project calm, there was widespread uneasiness in this city as soldiers patrolled the streets and blocked highways in and out of town."
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's failure to ignite congressional support for his original plan to alleviate the Mexican financial crisis advertises once again the weak hand he holds with the Republicans in control on Capitol Hill, and with fellow Democrats there as well.But in acting by executive authority to rush aid to the United States' third-largest trading partner, he nevertheless may help himself politically.He has demonstrated a willingness to assert presidential power that runs counter to his debilitating image as an Oval Office occupant who lacks the key quality of leadership that Americans want in their presidents.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | January 12, 1994
OCOSINGO, Mexico -- With automatic rifles strapped on their shoulders, soldiers are handing out dozens of bags of food to the needy residents of this town.Military doctors are tending to sick children and distributing free medicine at a clinic, and soldiers on foot and riding armored vehicles patrol the streets, asking residents if they can help them in any way.In front of one house, a soldier approaches an elderly man, whose wrinkled face stiffens in fear. They are not used to kindness from the Mexican army in these parts.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1994
...TC McCormick & Co. Inc. moved yesterday to expand its operations in Mexico through the purchase of Grupo Pesa, one of that country's leading suppliers of flavorings to the food processing industry.Terms of the purchase were not disclosed."This acquisition, which will become part of McCormick's Flavor Group, expands our industrial business into Mexico and provides a base for the continued worldwide support of our food processing customers," said Bailey A. Thomas, McCormick's chairman and chief executive, in a statement.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 4, 1997
BENTONVILLE, Ark. -- Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said yesterday that it will buy a controlling stake in Cifra SA, Mexico's largest retailer, for $1.2 billion in cash, its biggest step yet to expand into international markets.The companies jointly operate 152 discount stores, supermarkets and restaurants in Mexico in a venture that will be merged into Cifra. Wal-Mart will then buy at least half of Cifra's shares -- a big bet on a country that has yet to develop a large middle class and where consumers haven't recovered from a deep recession.
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | April 7, 1991
Mexico City.--It was a most un-Japanese thing to do.The Japanese legislator was a guest of the Mexican Senate last summer. His hosts were asking him the usual softball questions about Mexico as a good place to invest.Surely, he would respond with praise.But, alas, Kei Inoue would not be restrained.Mexico, he said, was corrupt and anti-democratic. No sensible Japanese businessman would invest a single yen unless Mexico cleaned up its act.Today the United States and Canada are poised to begin negotiations with Mexico on a historic trade agreement, as President Bush meets in Houston with Mexico's President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 17, 1995
PASO REAL, Mexico -- Just eight miles up a rutted mountain road from the modern highway linking glitzy Acapulco with the new Ixtapa resort sits a concrete mausoleum for five men who lived and died in a Mexico that few international beach-goers will ever know.This Mexico is so poor that peasants must sell pigs to buy fertilizer, so unsafe that, for fear of robbers, they dare not carry cash from those sales with them when they go to the county seat for supplies.And it is so violent that even such a precaution ultimately did not protect them.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | October 14, 1991
Monterrey, Mexico. - In the United States, many people worry about Latinization: See, there is this tan wave of Mexican immigrants, and they still speak Spanish, and they stick together. One hears talk, from some Hispanics and some Anglos, sometimes half-serious and sometimes half-not, that they (the Mexicans) will re-occupy the American Southwest -- Montezuma's real revenge.In Mexico, there is an opposite anxiety: Americanization. This booming metropolis, with almost 4 million people, allegedly has the world's highest rate of television satellite dishes, bringing down everything from Monday Night Football to the Playboy Channel.
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