Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMexico
IN THE NEWS

Mexico

NEWS
November 7, 1993
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, probably the best friend the United States ever had south of the Rio Grande, is preparing his people for possible rejection of the North American Free Trade Agreement by a feckless U.S. Congress.Knowing full well that such a rebuff will only inflame traditional Mexican resentment toward the gringos, Mr. Salinas is asserting national pride while downgrading the importance of a treaty he had hoped would be capstone of his presidency."We have no desire to be like others," he acidly commented in his final state of the nation speech, "or to share their deficiencies."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2000
"The Years with Laura Diaz," by Carlos Fuentes. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 518 pages. $26. Mexico's leading novelist, Carlos Fuentes, the author of "The Old Gringo" and "The Death of Artemio Cruz," wastes the possibility of producing a great national epic through self-indulgent writing and a persistent unwillingness to edit his own material. Based largely on stories of his family and Fuentes' vast knowledge of 20th century Mexican history, "The Years with Laura Diaz" traces the life of its fictitious heroine through selected moments in her life which also connect with the ongoing history of the country.
NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | January 16, 1992
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Mexico has lifted a month-old ban on U.S. hogs and exporters can resume shipments next week, officials say.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | July 12, 2009
Question: : I am planning to fly with my 5-year-old grandson from Roanoke, Va., to Mexico City. Does Mexico require a car seat? Answer: : In researching this question, I found conflicting answers. The World Health Organization says child restraint systems are the law in Mexico. But a representative answering the phone for the Mexican Secretariat of Tourism, 800-446-39-426, recommended in the U.S. State Department's consular information sheet, told me, "The seat is not a requirement, so don't worry.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The United States and Mexico reached agreement yesterday on a broader-than-expected rescue plan that will include the use of U.S. funds to keep Mexico's private banks from collapsing, while effectively giving Washington veto power over much of Mexico's economic policy for the next decade.The $20 billion aid program, the centerpiece of an international loan package for Mexico worth about $50 billion, is intended to restore the confidence of international investors in the Mexican economy and gradually pull the country out of its financial crisis.
NEWS
By WALTER TRUETT ANDERSON | August 14, 1992
Mexico City. -- Although most Americans haven't yet noticed, one of the biggest revolutions yet in Latin America's history is going on in Mexico -- without a gun being fired.This revolution is economic, and its main objective is to bring Mexico fully into the global economy. The ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement will give this revolution a great boost, but that agreement is not the whole story: President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, an economist, has already taken his country far along a new, and probably irreversible, path of change.
NEWS
By GINGER THOMPSON and GINGER THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
"Bordering on Chaos: Guerrillas, Stockbrokers, Politicians and Mexico's Road to Prosperity," by Andres Oppenheimer. Little Brown and Co. 349 pages, $24.95.Mexico remains so terribly misunderstood. Thanks to the likes of Ross Perot, most of America views its neighbor to the south as a dusty backwater where people only live in miserable poverty.About the only time stories from Mexico make it onto the network news it is to show images of desperate people leaping over the barbed wire fences at the border to seek jobs in this country.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | December 23, 1992
CANCUN, Mexico -- With a lot of U.S. investor money lookin for a place to land, Mexico is being touted as a land of opportunity in 1993.The psychological groundwork has already been set. In this resort city, for example, economic "hands across the border" remain locked in a firm, friendly handshake. Tourists greeted by the likes of McDonald's, Domino's Pizza and Gold's Gym here understand the desire of U.S. firms to profit from tourists and locals.However, the concept of an individual investing in this economically awakening country remains a new and worrisome concept.
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | September 8, 1991
Mexico City. --While the rest of the world was dumbfounded by the arrival of democracy in the Soviet Union, America's most populous neighbor was looking the other way.On Aug. 18, Mexico went to the polls and to no great surprise, the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) won more than 60 percent of the vote.Only one of the nine opposition parties got more than 10 percent of the vote -- and that was only 17.7 percent.The PRI won all but 10 of the 300 directly elected seats in the lower house of Congress and all but one of the 32 seats up for election in the 64-member Senate.
NEWS
By Abraham F. Lowenthal | July 6, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- The stunning victory by Vicente Fox and his National Action Party, or PAN, in Sunday's Mexican presidential elections is a truly momentous step on the road to effective democratic governance, but it is only one step. The most important challenges Mexico faces if it is to build true democracy remain ahead. They are: Can Mr. Fox and the leaders of PAN, after so many years in opposition without real prospects of exercising national responsibility, now develop the attitudes, expectations and practices that foster democracy?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.