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NEWS
January 4, 1995
Not for the first time, the U.S. will have to do whatever it takes to rescue Mexico from financial crisis. Our neighbor to the south is once again convulsed by a run on the peso caused by profligate economic policies designed to ease domestic unrest. And, once again, the government is forced to respond with austerity measures punishing to a huge worker-peasant class that has seen its real earnings diminish despite increasing industrialization.But that is not Mexico's only problem. As a medium-sized Third World nation that shares a 2,000-mile border with the world's richest, biggest, market, its position is truly unique.
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NEWS
August 23, 1994
Mexico has voted to close out the century still under the control of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) that has held uninterrupted power since 1929. Although charges of scattered irregularities have accompanied the victory of Ernesto Zedillo, a 42-year-old Yale-trained technocrat, his triumph is a step forward in Mexico's labored development of a credible democratic system.For the United States, the results virtually insure continuity of economic policies that have opened up Mexico to foreign investment and broken down protectionist barriers through adoption of the North American Free Trade Agreement.
NEWS
March 30, 1994
Mexico's desperate need for stability following the assassination of its president-apparent has impelled its ruling party to designate Ernesto Zedillo as its candidate in the Aug. 21 elections. As an unabashed protege of President Carlos Salinas, the 42-year-old Zedillo will be welcomed by an international investment fraternity that has rejoiced in the opening of the Mexican economy and ratification of the North American Free Trade Agreement.Whether he will be welcomed by the Mexican electorate will be the stuff of political speculation for months to come.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
Victor Paez has a simple explanation for why his teams from Mexico have advanced to eight straight championship games at the Cal Ripken World Series. "We love baseball," Paez said through an interpreter, "and we play with passion," Some serious bats haven't hurt, either. A three-run homer by shortstop Luis Urias and a solo shot by first baseman Luis Millan paved the way Sunday for starting pitcher Gerardo Haro, who went the distance, allowing three hits against U.S. champion Ocala, Fla., in a 7-1 win before a record crowd estimated at more than 5,000 at the Ripken Youth Baseball Academy in Aberdeen.
NEWS
January 20, 1995
All the usual suspects -- the protectionists, the xenophobes, the ultra-nationalists -- are coming out of the woodwork to take another bash at Mexico. The pretext last time was the North American Free Trade Agreement, a pact already benefiting the U.S. and its neighbor. This time it is a bipartisan Clinton-Gingrich plan to provide $40 billion in U.S. loan guarantees to bolster the Mexican financial system after a crash in the value of the peso.Ross Perot is at it again, talking about "a great sucking noise" as greenbacks pour south of the Rio Grande.
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | June 12, 1994
Mexico's once-stable orbit is beginning to wobble. The predictable tides that ebbed and flowed for 65 years no longer respond to the pull of the world's longest-ruling political party. The latest polls show that its colorless presidential candidate stands a good chance of losing the Aug. 21 election, breaking a line of succession that began in 1929.The biggest challenge to the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) is coming from Diego Fernandez de Cevallos, a 53-year-old mildly irreverent lawyer who rocketed to fame during the nation's first televised presidential debate last month.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
With fingers tightly crossed, Mexican officials are now saying the worst of their financial crisis is over. The peso is up 25 percent from its early-March lows, the stock market has rebounded 65 percent, exports are zooming 29 percent while imports have dropped 3.4 percent. Finance Minister Guillermo Ortiz fully expects his government will be able to meet its foreign debt obligations through a tough period ending in June.What pulled Mexico back from the brink of bankruptcy was a massive $50 billion international support program, 40 percent of which was pledged by the Clinton administration in an executive power move bypassing Congress.
TRAVEL
By Judy Wiley and Judy Wiley,[Fort Worth (texas) Star-Telegram] | August 27, 2006
ANGANGUEO, MICHOACAN, MEXICO / / They travel thousands of miles, unerringly, every year between Canada and Mexico. No one knows how they find their way. Las mariposas -- the butterflies -- come by the millions. They arrive in Mexico's heartland, the Sierra Madre in the state of Michoacan, every November. Five sanctuaries are established to protect them and to let visitors see the miracle of the monarchs. Guide Andres Orosco and I start the three-hour drive from Morelia to Santuario El Rosario near Angangueo early in the morning.
NEWS
By Juan Jose Bremer | November 26, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Before Sept. 11, 2001, Mexico and the United States were on the threshold of a tremendous breakthrough. President Vicente Fox and President Bush came to power with a shared commitment to deepen and widen the economic gains of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) by defining a new bilateral partnership that would bring our two countries even closer, for the mutual benefit of the citizens of both nations. At the core of this partnership would be a new approach for the movement of people across our 2,000-mile border.
NEWS
February 1, 1995
Sixty years after Franklin D. Roosevelt set up a stabilization fund to protect the dollar after going off the gold standard, President Clinton dipped into that same fund yesterday for quite a different purpose. Instead of worrying about an outflow of gold from the United States, which was FDR's concern, Mr. Clinton was in near panic over Mexico's financial crisis. To stop capital from fleeing Mexico in such volume that it could trigger revolution, he will use up to $20 billion of the $37.5 billion U.S. Exchange Stabilization Fund to prop up the peso.
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