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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- The first formal migration study to be sponsored by the U.S. and Mexican governments has concluded that the number of undocumented Mexican workers who have settled in the United States in this decade is far lower than some politicians have suggested, only about 105,000 a year.Drawn from a two-year analysis of U.S. and Mexican census and other data, the figure is the first authoritative estimate of the net annual flow of illegal Mexican workers into the United States, which has been an elusive statistic at the center of political and academic dispute on both sides of the border.
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NEWS
By Jenny Jarvie | June 10, 2007
Fort Valley, Ga. -- Food Depot is slower this summer. A hot, frazzled mother lingers in front of a tower of banana Moon Pies; a man in overalls counts change for a 77-cent bag of ice. Cashiers gossip, then sigh. They miss the Hispanics who loaded the checkout belts with flour tortillas, thick golden cornhusks and tamarind sodas. Nearly 80 percent of Georgia's peach crop was destroyed when a severe frost spread across the Southeast at Easter. Without peaches, the orchards clustered around this railroad town 80 miles south of Atlanta have little work for migrant laborers.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Rona Kobell and Chris Guy and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
HOOPER'S ISLAND - In the seasonal rhythm of life on this slice of land dangling alongside the Chesapeake Bay, the first days of the commercial crab season are marked by anticipation. No one will be catching any crabs until temperatures rise a bit, but the crab pots are ready - repaired, painted and neatly stacked. The decks of low-slung work boats are scrubbed. Diesel engines are fine-tuned. At the crab processing houses, industrial-sized crab steamers and stainless steel picking tables are gleaming.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
STUNG BY accusations of federal neglect at the U.S.-Mexico border, the Department of Homeland Security last month announced initiatives to detain and deport more illegal immigrants. The criticisms, lodged by the governors of Arizona and New Mexico, capped a growing national chorus for better immigration control. Congressional lawmakers should use this momentum to reform immigration law during the current legislative session and establish the guest worker program proposed by President Bush.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
Three Mexican crab-pickers have sued an Eastern Shore seafood packer for allegedly paying them below minimum wage, charging them excessive rent to live in cramped conditions and forbidding them to leave their house after dark.The Mexican women were brought to the United States legally to work for Tony's Seafood, a small packer on Hoopers Island in Dorchester County, under a federal program for industries that cannot find enough American workers. About 130 Mexican women picked crabs this season for several packers on the island chain 25 miles south of Cambridge.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - The nimble fingers of Consuelo Morales, 52, were flying through what looked like mountains of steamed crabs piled high on stainless steel tables. Gripping her paring knife, she ripped away shell after shell to dig out fluffy white lumps, deftly flicking the crab meat - the Chesapeake's most prized bounty - into plastic "Capt. Charlie" brand containers. After months of uncertainty, Morales and a dozen other veterans from central Mexico were back at work yesterday in a crab-packing plant in this swampy corner of Maryland's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Bill Barry | May 1, 1991
THE BUSH administration's attempt to create a huge "free-trade zone," which would allow manufactured goods from Mexico to enter the U.S. without tariff, would be a catastrophe for American workers and the U.S. economy in general.Such a U.S.-Mexico agreement is likely if Congress by the end of this month extends the seven-year-old "fast-track" procedures that require the president to consult with Congress during trade negotiations and Congress to accept or reject an agreement, with no amendments, when it is submitted.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
In a reaffirmation of Roman Catholic social teaching, the U.S. bishops called yesterday for just treatment of Mexican migrants and urged a stronger commitment to "overcome the scandal of poverty in our land." Their statement on migration, "Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope," was the first joint document issued by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the bishops of Mexico, who are expected to approve it this week. Responding to debate in the United States over limiting immigration, the bishops' letter acknowledges that sovereign nations have a right to protect their borders.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
FISHING CREEK -- There's a new ingredient in the Maryland crab cake: Mexican labor.Take a look around seafood packer Jay Newcomb's picking house, and you'll see the new face of his industry: Around one table piled high with steamed crabs work three older Americans; a second table is empty, and at five others, 21 young Mexican women strip white meat from shells.The story is the same at all but the smallest of the dozen seafood-processing plants here on Hoopers Island in Dorchester County: Were it not for Mexican labor, the crabs wouldn't get picked, and Maryland would have to look elsewhere for the makings of its beloved crab cakes.
NEWS
By James Bock | July 12, 1991
After a decade of peeling shrimp in a Mexican packing plant for as little as $5 a day, Gloria Osuna Osuna seized the chance to come to Maryland's Eastern Shore.Her U.S. employers, she says, offered her a job picking crab meat that would net her $250 a week after food and lodging expenses. She says she was promised a bed in an air-conditioned house with television and a laundry room.But when she arrived for work May 18 at Philip J. Harrington & Son Inc., a seafood-packing plant in the little Dorchester County town of Secretary, Ms. Osuna says, found she would share a flea-ridden, one-bedroom house with a dozen Mexican workers.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - The nimble fingers of Consuelo Morales, 52, were flying through what looked like mountains of steamed crabs piled high on stainless steel tables. Gripping her paring knife, she ripped away shell after shell to dig out fluffy white lumps, deftly flicking the crab meat - the Chesapeake's most prized bounty - into plastic "Capt. Charlie" brand containers. After months of uncertainty, Morales and a dozen other veterans from central Mexico were back at work yesterday in a crab-packing plant in this swampy corner of Maryland's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
WITH THE introduction of a comprehensive and thoughtful immigration reform proposal last week, Sens. John McCain and Edward M. Kennedy, the current darlings of immigrant advocacy groups, emerged as voices of reason in the increasingly heated and politicized debate over immigration. Their aptly named "Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act" addresses numerous concerns of those on the right and left about immigration policy, focusing the debate instead exactly where it should be - on keeping the nation's borders safe, controlling the flow of migrants who illegally cross them daily, meeting the needs of a labor market hungry for low-wage workers, and moving into mainstream society and onto the tax rolls millions of illegal immigrants in this country.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Rona Kobell and Chris Guy and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
HOOPER'S ISLAND - In the seasonal rhythm of life on this slice of land dangling alongside the Chesapeake Bay, the first days of the commercial crab season are marked by anticipation. No one will be catching any crabs until temperatures rise a bit, but the crab pots are ready - repaired, painted and neatly stacked. The decks of low-slung work boats are scrubbed. Diesel engines are fine-tuned. At the crab processing houses, industrial-sized crab steamers and stainless steel picking tables are gleaming.
NEWS
By Bob Kemper and Hugh Dellios and Bob Kemper and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush proposed sweeping changes yesterday to U.S. immigration law that could allow millions living and working illegally in America to obtain legitimate jobs and become U.S. citizens. Bush - surrounded by Hispanic activists and immigration advocates at the White House - proposed a three-year visa program to allow workers from Mexico and elsewhere to cross the border legally, and repeatedly, between their homeland and jobs in the United States. Reaction to Bush's proposal from Republican lawmakers and Mexican officials was cautiously supportive, while Democrats lambasted the election-year reforms as insufficient and politically motivated.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
In a reaffirmation of Roman Catholic social teaching, the U.S. bishops called yesterday for just treatment of Mexican migrants and urged a stronger commitment to "overcome the scandal of poverty in our land." Their statement on migration, "Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope," was the first joint document issued by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the bishops of Mexico, who are expected to approve it this week. Responding to debate in the United States over limiting immigration, the bishops' letter acknowledges that sovereign nations have a right to protect their borders.
NEWS
September 11, 2001
Allowing lawsuits may limit access to health care I take strong exception to the claim that allowing lawsuits under a patient's bill of rights is the best way to ensure patients get the health care coverage they need. Such lawsuits will dramatically increase health care costs and force more people to lose their health care coverage. Resist `dumbing down' of America's workforce It's ironic to suggest that the minimum level of education for admission to a United Association [plumbers' union]
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
MEXICO CITY - When he visits the United States this week, Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox will ask leaders to show "a vision for the future" and seriously consider his ideas for ending illegal immigration and spurring job growth in Mexico to prevent it, Fox said yesterday. Those ideas include opening the U.S. border to more legal Mexican workers and contributing to an international development fund with as much as $10 billion to $20 billion. "I'm not begging or asking for charity," Fox said.
NEWS
May 18, 1993
Helen Delich Bentley, the Republican congresswoman for Maryland's Second District, is an equal-opportunity protectionist.Having acquired an international reputation by taking a sledgehammer to a Toshiba boombox made by the rich Japanese, she lately has gone south of the Rio Grande to weep tears for the poor Mexicans -- this in hopes of bashing the pending North American Free Trade Agreement to bits.Mrs. Bentley is anything but inconsistent. Given a choice between a liberal flow of goods, services and capital across international borders and erecting trade barriers around the mightiest and wealthiest maritime nation the world has ever seen, Representative Bentley votes protectionist every time.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a bold challenge to the Bush administration, President Vicente Fox of Mexico called yesterday for an agreement by the end of the year to greatly expand the rights of Mexicans working in the United States. Fox's push for a quick accord to improve the status of the roughly 3 million illegal Mexican immigrants in this country would have to overcome deep opposition in Congress. Some lawmakers are concerned about how legalizing immigrants would affect the U.S. economy and American workers.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
MEXICO CITY - When he visits the United States this week, Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox will ask leaders to show "a vision for the future" and seriously consider his ideas for ending illegal immigration and spurring job growth in Mexico to prevent it, Fox said yesterday. Those ideas include opening the U.S. border to more legal Mexican workers and contributing to an international development fund with as much as $10 billion to $20 billion. "I'm not begging or asking for charity," Fox said.
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