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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 22, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- The faithful here are eager, and the secular -- especially government officials -- are worried.That's because during John Paul II's fourth papal visit to this most populous Spanish-speaking country this weekend, he is expected to inveigh against economic policies that aren't heedful of their social consequences. His call for Mexicans and others to work for economic and social justice will come in public, perhaps in his meeting tomorrow with President Ernesto Zedillo.The words of the head of the Roman Catholic Church carry weight with many Mexicans, but few observers claim to be sure how they may react.
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NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 6, 2013
Author's disclaimer: Today's piece may cause my center/right readers severe irritability, sleeplessness, and a strong desire to limit your cable television options to Fox. The antidote may not arrive until the midterm elections of 2014. Fiscal cliff negotiations: a real bummer. An empowered president intent on fulfilling his progressive inclination to raise taxes. An emboldened Harry Reid strangely silent about his inability to pass a budget through a Democratic Senate over the past three years.
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BUSINESS
By Patrick Rucker and Patrick Rucker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 24, 2004
Inocencio Cruz used to imagine that building a home in Mexico would be a family affair. He would send money to his parents from Chicago and rely on them to buy the supplies and oversee the work. But with the help of Construmex, a cross-border contractor, immigrants such as Cruz, 22, are able to buy the construction materials they need to build homes in Mexico. "I do everything from here," he said recently. "All my parents have to do is talk on the phone and all the materials arrive." Although the Mexican economy long has benefited from remittances sent from north of the border, that wealth often has to be used for expenses such as food, medicine and school tuition.
NEWS
March 10, 2011
In response to your editorial, "A flawed compromise on illegal immigrant tuition" (March 7), I propose a better plan. After graduating from high school, the illegal aliens should be deported back to Mexico along with their parents. There the student can enroll in a college in Mexico, and the Mexican government can pay for the student's education. After college, the student can become a productive citizen of Mexico and a part of their economy. Robert J. Stryjewski
NEWS
March 10, 2011
In response to your editorial, "A flawed compromise on illegal immigrant tuition" (March 7), I propose a better plan. After graduating from high school, the illegal aliens should be deported back to Mexico along with their parents. There the student can enroll in a college in Mexico, and the Mexican government can pay for the student's education. After college, the student can become a productive citizen of Mexico and a part of their economy. Robert J. Stryjewski
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | September 14, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- In honor of the nonviolent struggle led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the Mexican government last weekend unveiled a statue of the civil rights leader near a statue of Abraham Lincoln in a wealthy neighborhood park.Coretta Scott King, Dr. King's widow, was invited by the Mexican government to oversee the ceremony, and she spoke to students at a Mexican college about the effectiveness of nonviolent methods in the pursuit of human rights.While she spoke, Israel Galan fidgeted in his chair.
NEWS
By JANIS M. LAWRENCE | June 21, 1995
East Sandwich, Mass.-- Mexico is not tottering on the brink of financial collapse, despite current reporting. In the words of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Mexico is an ''oil . . . world power.''According to data published by the Bank of Mexico and the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Mexican government's proven oil reserves are the eighth-largest in the world. Mexico's oil reserves are 100 percent greater than those of the United States and more than 1,000 percent greater than those of the United Kingdom.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 16, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- In a bold move to restore confidence of international investors, Mexico is repaying -- three years ahead of schedule -- the remaining $3.5 billion it owes the United States from an emergency loan.The Mexican government said yesterday that it is using bond sales to make the repayment and will pay $1.5 billion in advance to the International Monetary Fund."This is another step to consolidate our economic recovery," Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo said. "It proves that we Mexicans are leaving behind the crisis."
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- A confrontation between sheriff's deputies and uniformed drug traffickers along the Texas border has intensified concerns about forays into the United States by Mexican soldiers while heightening tensions over border violence. U.S. officials are demanding that Mexico fully investigate an incident Monday in which several men with military-style uniforms and weapons helped suspected marijuana traffickers escape into Mexico. Mexican officials deny that soldiers were involved.
NEWS
April 21, 1998
NO ONE EVER called the works of Octavio Paz easy reads. But to persevere was to come to delight in the beauty of their language and their insight into the human condition, specifically Mexico's history and its people.Mr. Paz, the patriarch of Mexican letters and winner of a Nobel Prize for his poetry and essays, died Sunday at age 84. Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo announced the death, but did not give details. Last year, Mr. Paz said he was suffering from a disease that he described as "long and wretched"; friends reported he had cancer.
NEWS
By CARLOS DE ICAZA | May 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In recent days, we have heard many voices in various parts of this great country expressing different views, concerns and hopes regarding the outcome of the immigration debate. Certainly, the future of millions of people, including many Mexicans, will depend on the results of that process. Mexico is respectful of the ongoing debate on immigration reform in Congress and the right of all countries to take actions that are deemed appropriate for their security and national interests.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2006
MEXICO CITY -- A confrontation between sheriff's deputies and uniformed drug traffickers along the Texas border has intensified concerns about forays into the United States by Mexican soldiers while heightening tensions over border violence. U.S. officials are demanding that Mexico fully investigate an incident Monday in which several men with military-style uniforms and weapons helped suspected marijuana traffickers escape into Mexico. Mexican officials deny that soldiers were involved.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
THE RECENT closure of the American consulate in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, was the wrong response to the carnage playing out along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, on the same day that Ambassador Tony Garza announced the consulate's reopening, rival drug gangs vying for control of limited transit routes into the United States claimed their latest victims: the head of the City Council's Public Security Commission and his bodyguard. Both men were gunned down in what has become a routine occurrence on Nuevo Laredo's blood-soaked streets.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Rucker and Patrick Rucker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 24, 2004
Inocencio Cruz used to imagine that building a home in Mexico would be a family affair. He would send money to his parents from Chicago and rely on them to buy the supplies and oversee the work. But with the help of Construmex, a cross-border contractor, immigrants such as Cruz, 22, are able to buy the construction materials they need to build homes in Mexico. "I do everything from here," he said recently. "All my parents have to do is talk on the phone and all the materials arrive." Although the Mexican economy long has benefited from remittances sent from north of the border, that wealth often has to be used for expenses such as food, medicine and school tuition.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2002
MEXICO CITY - Pope John Paul II canonized the first Indian saint of the Americas yesterday during a ceremony laced with emotional tributes to the Western Hemisphere's indigenous roots. Cheering and weeping, hundreds of thousands of Mexicans lined every inch of the 25-mile route the aged pontiff took in his "popemobile" between the Vatican residence here and the Basilica of the Virgin of Guadalupe. The pope, appearing alert but extremely weak, has long expressed affection for overwhelmingly Roman Catholic Mexico.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2001
MEXICO CITY - Francisco Ortiz Pinchetti got a taste of what he was up against only a day into the new government of Vicente Fox. Ortiz Pinchetti, one of Mexico's leading independent journalists, had just been named director of Notimex, the state news agency that has a well-earned reputation as the propaganda arm of the Mexican government. That same day, Notimex received several communiques from Subcomandante Marcos, the rebel leader in the southern state of Chiapas, who had been silent for months.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
The sharp decline in the peso over the past week has left its mark on companies in Maryland and across the nation who invest or do business in Mexico.In the past three years, Mexico has become one of the fastest-growing export markets for Maryland businesses, with such companies as dredge manufacturer Ellicott Machine Corp. International and architectural firm RTKL Associates Inc. ringing up sales and joint venture agreements across the border.In the first nine months of this year, Maryland exports to Mexico rose more than 28 percent, to $71.4 million, according to the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By PATRICK MARSHALL | May 31, 1991
Washington. - Twenty-eight furniture makers have fled Los Angeles for Mexico over the last three years, and, according to the General Accounting Office, the great majority of them cited Los Angeles' stringent environmental regulations as a major reason for the move. Mexico, the report noted, has not even established pollution standards for the paints and solvents the furniture makers use.The furniture makers are not alone. An estimated 1,500 companies have sited plants in Mexican border regions since 1965.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 22, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- The faithful here are eager, and the secular -- especially government officials -- are worried.That's because during John Paul II's fourth papal visit to this most populous Spanish-speaking country this weekend, he is expected to inveigh against economic policies that aren't heedful of their social consequences. His call for Mexicans and others to work for economic and social justice will come in public, perhaps in his meeting tomorrow with President Ernesto Zedillo.The words of the head of the Roman Catholic Church carry weight with many Mexicans, but few observers claim to be sure how they may react.
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