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By Edward J. Sozanski and Edward J. Sozanski,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 26, 1993
The visible part of an art museum's permanent collection is never as "permanent" as it may seem to occasional visitors. It changes constantly in subtle ways, as objects are removed or added for various reasons.Unless one visits a particular museum frequently, such minor alterations may escape notice. But when a museum fundamentally revises the way it presents an important part of its collection, the result can seem startling, even disconcerting.The Metropolitan Museum of Art has just completed such reconstructive surgery with its galleries for 19th-century European painting and sculpture.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
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By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2000
NEW YORK -- Even 141 years ago, New York City was the most conceited city in the hemisphere. Consider the landmark 1859 map that depicts a fish-eye view of New York Harbor as nothing less than the entire globe of the earth. This lithograph of Gotham as the hub of the world is a startling forerunner of that iconic, much-copied New Yorker cover by Saul Steinberg in 1976, an illustration that portrayed the city as the self-absorbed epicenter of all that matters. The 19th-century lithograph, by John Bachmann, an artist and publisher, is presented in "Art and the Empire City: New York, 1825-1861," an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It highlights the era when New York grew exponentially from a promising provincial port city to the largest metropolis in the Western Hemisphere, the locus of American trade, culture and the arts.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
Benita H. Low, a retired private school educator and museum docent, died Tuesday of respiratory failure at Roland Park Place. She was 97. The daughter of Clifford Milburn Holland, an engineer for whom New York's Holland Tunnel is named, and Anna Coolidge Holland, a homemaker, the former Benita Davenport Holland was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1925, a year after her father's death, Mrs. Low and her family moved to Cambridge, Mass., where she...
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | September 24, 1997
If clothes could only talk. ... Well, sometimes they actually do. There have been many fashion moments when designers have literally spelled out their ideas and married text to textile. "Word-robe" the exhibition now at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a visual lexicon of those moments in 20th century fashion.Richard Martin, costume curator for the Met, took the higher road for this exhibit. He found many examples of written fashion without resorting to T-shirts of the "I'm with stupid" school of clothing communication.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 4, 1999
When I was a small boy in New York during the 1950s, I took the bus every day from our apartment in Harlem to Hunter College elementary school downtown. On the way back, I would sometimes stop at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on 82nd Street to wander through its vast, high-ceilinged galleries.Everything about the place was monumental to my young eyes, particularly the Greek and Roman galleries. Naturally I was intensely curious about all those unclothed marble figures. Only later did I discover that the nude is a form, rather than a subject of art, and that while nakedness is shameful, the nude symbolizes the body transformed and perfected.
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By Holland Cotter and Holland Cotter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 2002
NEW YORK - Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) liked attention. He wore funny clothes, said shocking things, painted gorgeous pictures and traveled halfway around the world to get it. His efforts paid off. When he died of syphilis at 54 on an island in the South Pacific, people around the world took notice, and they have been noticing him ever since. So it's surprising to learn that "Gauguin in New York Collections: The Lure of the Exotic," at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is the first major New York-area exhibition devoted to him in more than 40 years.
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By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,HARTFORD COURANT | May 16, 1996
In olden days a glimpse of stocking was thought as somethingshocking, now, heaven knows, anything goes.Cole Porter In the 1930s, J. C. Flugel wrote in "The Psychology of Clothes" that the fashion engine runs because the eye is exhausted with one vista and needs another view to stimulate sexual response."
NEWS
July 13, 1991
James Revson, 38, a society columnist for Newsday, died Thursday of AIDS in New York. He joined Newsday in 1984 as an architecture and design writer and in 1988 began writing the paper's society column, "Social Studies." That year he became celebrated himself after revealing that Suzy, the gossip columnist of the New York Post, had reported that many celebrities attended a gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art when in fact they had not been there.
NEWS
September 12, 1996
The art preview in Sunday's Sun named the wrong New York museum that will have a major retrospective of works by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot (1796-1875). The exhibit will be at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Oct. 29 through Jan. 19.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/12/96
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
If there's one work that economically and poetically encapsulates the theme of the new exhibit "Ashe to Amen," it's a black-and-white photograph of a well-thumbed Bible, flipped open and lying atop an African drum. The 1989 gelatin print by Chester Higgins Jr., part of the exhibit on display through Sept. 29 at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, explores in one deceptively simple shot how African culture clashes and commingles with Christian traditions.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
It's one of the ironies of the art world that major cultural institutions like the Baltimore Museum of Art are home to priceless collections of paintings, sculpture and other works by the world's greatest masters, yet they often struggle to come up with money to fix a leaky roof, pay the electricity bill or hire staff. We'd hesitate to guess the value of the BMA's holdings, but surely the total must reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet no museum that valued its reputation could sell off a Picasso or a Matisse every time the basement flooded or a heating and air-conditioning unit failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
More than five years after a financial crisis ravaged the U.S. economy, the Baltimore Museum of Art has finally run out of options. Museum administrators announced Monday that after exhausting other cost-cutting measures, they have laid off 14 employees, or 9 percent of the 154-member staff. The cuts, which affected 11 full-time and three part-time employees, took effect immediately. The job cuts are needed to make up a projected deficit of more than $500,000 by July 1, according to museum director Doreen Bolger, and to accommodate a budget that is shrinking by $1 million from its current level of $12.9 million for the 2012-2013 fiscal year.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It almost seems as if Jeff Holland can stand in the gallery of his museum for hours, just gazing at the pictures on its rugged walls. It isn't that he has nothing better to do. As executive director of the Annapolis Maritime Museum in Eastport, he's responsible for finding funds, planning events, installing materials and in general keeping the museum about life in and around the Chesapeake moving "full steam ahead," as he puts it in the museum's latest...
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | December 23, 2007
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE CELEBRATING the holidays by indulging in all sorts of edible treats. And the March of Dimes' "Culinary Extravaganza" was certainly the place to do it. The Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel was stuffed with people stuffing themselves on all sorts of edible wonders created by about 30 local chefs -- goodies such as: chocolate-covered cheesecake lollipops, smoked salmon with zucchini slaw and toasted almonds, sliced tenderloin with...
NEWS
September 15, 2005
BEVERLY GUNNELS passed away in Biloxi, Mississippi on August 29, 2005, as a result of the wretched Hurricane Katrina. She was 61 years old. She is survived by her only son Warren; her niece Melissa; her step-daughter Kimberly; and her brother-in-law Charles Warren. On July 3, 1970, Beverly married Chicago attorney Larry Gunnels and were together for 34 happy years. On February 15, 1971, Mrs. Gunnels' son Warren was born. In 2004, Beverly and Larry moved to the Village at Waugh Chapel in Gambrills, Maryland to be closer to their son. In April 2005, not too long after her husband passed away, Beverly returned to her hometown of Gulfport, Mississippi to be near her old high school friends.
NEWS
August 12, 2003
Bonnie August, 56, a clothing designer who favored stretchy materials and helped create the 1970s disco uniform of a unitard with a wraparound skirt, died of ovarian cancer Saturday at her home in New York City. Ms. August's designs are part of the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She made her most influential designs while working for dancewear company Danskin. She left the company in 1984.
NEWS
July 29, 2002
James Pilgrim, a fine arts consultant who organized international shows as a Metropolitan Museum of Art administrator in New York, died Friday of complications from lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 61 and lived in Brooklandville. Mr. Pilgrim, who did financial work for museums, held a number of administrative positions with the Metropolitan, and from 1978 to 1988 was its deputy director. He held curatorial posts at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington in the early 1970s.
NEWS
August 12, 2003
Bonnie August, 56, a clothing designer who favored stretchy materials and helped create the 1970s disco uniform of a unitard with a wraparound skirt, died of ovarian cancer Saturday at her home in New York City. Ms. August's designs are part of the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. She made her most influential designs while working for dancewear company Danskin. She left the company in 1984.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
WHILE THE AMERICANS were busy pre-empting Saddam Hussein, Baghdad's residents pre-emptied the National Museum. Bush administration leaders were quick to congratulate themselves for successfully securing Iraq's oil fields. The thorough looting of one of the world's great collections of antiquities? Well, that's just one of the costs of freedom. American soldiers and Marines argue that they were otherwise engaged while looters and professional crooks swiped and smashed tens of thousands of items from the museum over a period of 48 hours.
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