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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Whether you're coming to "Metropolis" fresh or for the third or fourth time, seeing the "complete" 147-minute version of Fritz Lang's 1927 silent masterpiece is like watching a fever dream reach delirious perfection. This glorious dystopia gains in both logic and gusto. Building on the 2001 124-minute restoration, it fills out Lang's vision of a futuristic city as a glittering, buzzing organism that thrusts high up into the atmosphere and digs way down into the earth. Now you can really connect to the romantic fervor behind the cool genius of Joh Fredersen, the architect of Metropolis — and the animus that simmers, then explodes between him and his mad-magician inventor, Rotwang.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Whether you're coming to "Metropolis" fresh or for the third or fourth time, seeing the "complete" 147-minute version of Fritz Lang's 1927 silent masterpiece is like watching a fever dream reach delirious perfection. This glorious dystopia gains in both logic and gusto. Building on the 2001 124-minute restoration, it fills out Lang's vision of a futuristic city as a glittering, buzzing organism that thrusts high up into the atmosphere and digs way down into the earth. Now you can really connect to the romantic fervor behind the cool genius of Joh Fredersen, the architect of Metropolis — and the animus that simmers, then explodes between him and his mad-magician inventor, Rotwang.
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FEATURES
By Michael Wilmington and Michael Wilmington,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2002
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 (two and one-half stars) If you need any evidence that we're living in some kind of Golden Age of movie animation, look no farther than Metropolis, the latest example of imported Japanese anime - and one of the more dazzling. Here is a film of staggering technical and visual virtuosity, filled with utterly amazing images that's also entertaining and engaging for children and adults on several levels. Yet in the era of Shrek, Waking Life and Monsters, Inc., not to mention the string of anime hits that includes such modern classics as Princess Mononoke, Ghost in the Shell and Akira (the last directed by Metropolis writer Katsuhiro Otomo)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2010
Fritz Lang's "Metropolis" stunningly portrays warring forces in a glittering skyscraper city. It arrives at the Senator on Friday, just in time to restore moviegoers' faith in epic movies. This "complete" version of Lang's silent sci-fi extravaganza restores all of its subplots and nearly all of its surging imagery. With Gottfried Huppertz's soaring romantic score heard in full for the first time, "Metropolis" offers an engulfing audiovisual experience. It leaves you shaking your head in wonder and disbelief.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 1, 1993
Here stands Robert Townsend in a hotel room above the city of dreams. Looking out the window, he can see buildings and avenues throbbing with people and cars, a veritable Oz, a Metropolis, teeming with life and possibility. And to this urban Mecca did he come last year to make a movie.And the city he looks out upon is . . . Baltimore?Yes, it is. It isn't New York. It sure isn't that dreary burg down the parkway where the buildings are white and the men all wear the same gray suit and the same black pointy little shoes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
When Metropolis premiered in Berlin in 1927, no one had seen anything like it. For Baltimoreans, the same is true today. The movie spills over with wonders, like a sci-fi horn of plenty - and in the restored version opening today for a week's run at the Senator, for the first time all the marvels fall into place. Pauline Kael rightly noted that H.G. Wells called it "quite the silliest movie." Yet director-designer William Cameron Menzies must have looked at it before shooting Wells' Things to Come.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 5, 1998
AUSTIN, Texas -- The city is buzzing over the Metropolis apartment complex. Oh-so-hip even for eclectic Austin, the just-completed 308-unit complex has concrete floors, colorful murals, exposed iron rafters and stucco walls. And, yes, there's a computer room in a resort-quality clubhouse.Besides being the new cool place to live, Metropolis has a lesser-known distinction: It's the first large-scale commercial development to be built with materials off the shelves of a Home Depot store.The timing of developer Justin Hilton's project coincided with a test started last fall at four Austin Home Depot stores.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 1, 2000
DC Comics is working on a bit of urban renewal as the new century brings a new look to two fabled comic-book cities: Metropolis and Gotham City. Superman's Metropolis has gotten a futuristic makeover: "It's the city of tomorrow as it always should have been, considering the Man of Tomorrow lives there," says Mike Carlin, executive editor of DC Comics. Batman's Gotham City, meanwhile, has been rebuilt in the wake of a devastating earthquake and a yearlong abandonment by the federal government.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1995
Hoping to revive the long-dormant Power Plant, the city chose a Baltimore developer yesterday to transform the hulking Inner Harbor complex into a broad mix of restaurants, clubs, retail stores, theaters and virtual reality games.Metropolis at the Power Plant, the Cordish Co.'s $18 million plan to revive the Pier 4 Power Plant, topped two other proposals to gain exclusive development rights for the 106,000-square-foot complex.A six-member review panel appointed by the city's economic development agency unanimously selected the Cordish proposal over those of the other contenders.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
A Memorable Place Metropolis is a super place By John L. Flynn SPECIAL TO THE SUN Forget Smallville, the fictional home of Jonathan and Martha Kent and their son Clark -- otherwise known as Superman. Residents of Metropolis, Ill., want visitors to think of their town as the legendary residence of Kal-El, the last son of Krypton. An avid fan of comic books, I spent most of my childhood in the Chicago suburbs reading about the Man of Steel, and had always assumed that Superman was found by the Kent family in an Illinois cornfield and raised near where I grew up. As children, we tend to think the world is smaller than it really is, and that everything of importance happens just over the rainbow in the next county.
FEATURES
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
POTSDAM, Germany -- It's hard to imagine screen siren Marlene Dietrich ever being just another blonde standing at a bus stop. But when she first strode across the lot of Studio Babelsberg in Potsdam some 80 years ago, there was little separating her from other young, unknown actresses hungry for their big break. But Dietrich didn't have to wait long, her breakout role coming in 1930's The Blue Angel. And she had Studio Babelsberg to thank. The film rocketed Dietrich to international stardom, and she soon left for Hollywood.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | February 16, 2007
One day soon at the state's largest airport, people may watch planes taking off from their bedroom window, head downstairs to shop at the town center or to get some work done at the office. Maybe they will catch the light rail to Hunt Valley, take the train to New York or fly to Europe. If the vision of Anne Arundel County Executive John R.
NEWS
August 31, 2005
IF NEW ORLEANS was lucky -- spared a direct hit Monday as Hurricane Katrina veered east of the below-sea-level metropolis -- the sigh of relief was all too brief. As the nation yesterday was only beginning to grasp the lethal blow that the storm dealt to Gulfport and Biloxi in Mississippi and Mobile in Alabama, waters suddenly began rising in the Big Easy from several breaches in its life-sustaining levees -- submerging 80 percent of the town in as much as 20 feet of water. Though perhaps not quite the long-predicted worst-case scenario for New Orleans -- the town turned into a toxic soup bowl -- it is much too close.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | March 6, 2005
Metropolis By Elizabeth Gaffney. Random House. 461 pages. $24.95. Murder, arson, rape, robbery, love and lust: It's all there and then some in Elizabeth Gaffney's first novel, Metropolis. This fact-based story centers on Dandy Johnny Dolan's murder of a brush manufacturer in New York City in 1875. The leader of the notorious Whyo Gang (of mostly Irish immigrants) that terrorized the city in the late 1800s, Dolan was hung on April 21, 1876, as described in Herbert Asbury's nonfiction classic, The Gangs of New York.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | October 23, 2004
BREAK FREE of the Baltimore Beltway, slide onto the very beginning of westbound Interstate 70, and in a mile or so there it is on the left, on the median strip, that new highway sign, big and bright and proclaiming an American continent of possibilities. The 10-foot-by-22-foot sign, installed by the state last July, flatly announces: "Columbus 420 miles St. Louis 845 miles Denver 1700 miles Cove Fort 2200 miles" That's Cove Fort, Utah. It's hardly a metropolis -- and not even a town.
TRAVEL
By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,Special to the Sun | October 19, 2003
Until a few years ago, I never imagined I'd enjoy a trip to Florida. I thought all it had to offer is a Mickey Mouse amusement park, kitschy roadside attractions, shopping malls and flirtations with skin cancer. I was wrong. Tampa has got it mostly right, particularly for those of us drawn to cities that allow their roots to show. Tampa, located on the Gulf Coast, has its upscale shopping districts, aquarium, major league sports, the largest performing-arts complex south of Washington, and a 21,000-seat ice arena that doubles as one of the highest-grossing pop-concert venues in the country.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
Turner Classic Movies airs a pair of silent-era German films tonight that must be seen to be believed. Talk about eerie"Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tiny Tim tiptoes through prime time with a guest spot here, as Dan debates whether to quit his job to work with his friends. ABC."Robin Hood: Men in Tights" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- "Young Frankenstein" was a classic, "The Producers" and "Blazing Saddles" had their moments, but it's been years since Mel Brooks made a consistently funny movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 14, 2002
Altered English: A Historic Tour Through the Evolution of Words and Their Meanings, by Jeffrey Kacirk (Pomegranate, 240 pages, $22.95). Earth's literate population is divided among people for whom words are simple tools, with no life beyond utility, and others for whom words are magic, organic -- living things that twitch and grow and play. Kacirk, whose day job is as a chiropractor, is a marvel of amateur lexicography -- in the esteemed 18th-century sense of amateur: utterly serious, deeply informed, but not so employed.
NEWS
September 10, 2003
CHINA'S SURPRISE announcement last week that it is dropping its drive to enact a vaguely worded and much feared set of internal security laws for Hong Kong is very welcome, though with a good dose of caution. On the face of it, the sudden turnabout appears to be a notable victory for oppressed Chinese desires for democracy. But Beijing seldom yields on political control, and so this appears much more of a strategic retreat than a declaration of defeat. Still, this summer's standoff over the proposed changes to Hong Kong's security law has been stirring.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
A Memorable Place Metropolis is a super place By John L. Flynn SPECIAL TO THE SUN Forget Smallville, the fictional home of Jonathan and Martha Kent and their son Clark -- otherwise known as Superman. Residents of Metropolis, Ill., want visitors to think of their town as the legendary residence of Kal-El, the last son of Krypton. An avid fan of comic books, I spent most of my childhood in the Chicago suburbs reading about the Man of Steel, and had always assumed that Superman was found by the Kent family in an Illinois cornfield and raised near where I grew up. As children, we tend to think the world is smaller than it really is, and that everything of importance happens just over the rainbow in the next county.
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