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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Now that US Airways has created a Southwest look-alike, the airline must clone its culture as well, top airline officials told some 150 US Airways workers yesterday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport."
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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
Less than a year after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Baltimore-Washington International Airport has replaced most of the domestic air service it lost as a result of flight reductions and cost-cutting moves implemented by struggling airlines last fall. The reversal comes after US Airways, once the airport's leading carrier, heightened fears of a sharp decline in service by dismantling its faltering Baltimore-based MetroJet division in December, ending 46 daily flights to Florida, Chicago, Boston and a handful of other heavily traveled destinations.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
US Airways Group Inc. broadened the reach of its low-cost MetroJet operation yesterday with four new flights to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., two out of Washington Dulles International Airport and two from Hartford, Conn.The announcement was part of MetroJet's plans to grow eventually to one-quarter the size of its Arlington, Va.-based parent. The new flights also fit with the company's plans to increase service to airports in popular Florida destinations as winter approaches.MetroJet service is planned or already in place between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Miami, Orlando, Tampa and Fort Lauderdale.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
Baltimore-Washington International Airport recorded a 10.4 percent year-over-year decline in passenger traffic in November as US Airways began to shut down its struggling MetroJet division in an effort to cut costs, state aviation officials reported yesterday. Despite the loss of a low-cost competitor, BWI continues to be the busiest of the region's three major airports. The airport handled 1.5 million passengers in November, compared with 1.3 million by Washington Dulles International Airport and 646,173 by Reagan National Airport.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
US Airways' first MetroJet flight takes off for Cleveland tomorrow morning at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, officially launching the carrier's long-awaited discount service and further solidifying BWI's position as a leading low-fare market.MetroJet's debut comes as its low-fare rival, Southwest Airlines, is undertaking a major expansion at BWI with the addition of 10 gates that could add as many as 100 daily flights by 2002.US Airways, the dominant carrier at BWI, lost nearly $3 billion from 1988 to 1995, in part because of Southwest's 1993 invasion of its East Coast stronghold.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
United Airlines' plans to cut MetroJet service from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to eight cities would eliminate more than half of US Airway's discount operation at the airport and a third of US Airway's total jet service. The cuts would result in a net reduction in daily flights - and possibly jobs - at the nation's second-fastest growing airport immediately after United's acquisition of US Airways, if regulators approve the $11.6 billion deal. Industry analysts say United's plans to eliminate the MetroJet routes signals its apparent decision to cede to Southwest Airlines much of the competition for budget-conscious leisure and business travelers at BWI. The eight cities being cut currently are served by 29 MetroJet flights - 58 percent of MetroJet's daily departures at BWI. MetroJet accounts for 50 of US Airways' 79 jet flights out of BWI every day. US Airways currently employs 2,085 at BWI, which also serves as a base for MetroJet's 200-plus pilots.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
Don't look for khaki-clad flight attendants to pop out of the overhead luggage bins. That won't be US Airways' style as its launches MetroJet, its new airline-within-an-airline, at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.But come June 1, when it rolls out five, brightly repainted Boeing 737s, the airline's strategy will be the same as Southwest's: move passengers quickly, nonstop, with few frills and a simple fare structure.Initially, existing flights to Providence, Fort Lauderdale and Cleveland will be converted to MetroJet service and discount flights will be added to Manchester, N.H., as well.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
In a move expected to trigger a new era of airfare competition, US Airways said yesterday that it will launch its long-anticipated discount division at Baltimore-Washington International Airport in June.The airline's low-fare operation, dubbed MetroJet, will begin June 1 by converting existing flights and adding new service to Providence, R.I., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Cleveland and Manchester, N.H. Other destinations and flights will be added monthly, the airline said.The fares -- expected to be announced within weeks -- will likely match or undercut Southwest Airlines, which flies to three of those cities and is expected to add Manchester.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
Baltimore-Washington International Airport has a new king. Southwest Airlines, six years after its inaugural East Coast flight, now flies more passengers through BWI than any other carrier.The news might seem like a blow to former No. 1 US Airways, which last year formed a low-fare subsidiary airline, called MetroJet, specifically to compete with Southwest.But airline industry observers don't think US Airways has lost the fight for Baltimore just yet.The real fight, they say, might be still to come.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In a move that will have major ramifications for travelers in Baltimore, US Airways Group Inc. has told pilots it plans to eliminate all of its MetroJet fleet as part of a cost-cutting plan, potentially resulting in the loss of 49 of the airline's 75 daily mainline jet flights out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The news comes as the White House and Congress agreed early today on a $15 billion plan to financially bolster the airline industry in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks that has threatened the survival of some airlines.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
Gambling that it can make money where US Airways failed, AirTran Airways launched new service to Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday, putting it in a league with a small number of low-fare carriers that continue to expand in the face of an economic downturn. "There is a certain degree of risk, but in a place like BWI, I think the economy is still pretty strong," said Kevin P. Healy, AirTran's vice president for planning. "It's a very large market." The airline began with three daily nonstop flights each from BWI to Atlanta and Boston.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
Amid growing signs of recession and new terrorist alerts, US Airways Group Inc. reported yesterday a larger-than-expected third-quarter loss of $766 million, making it the latest major U.S. airline to report a staggering loss for the quarter. The Arlington, Va.-based carrier, the nation's sixth-largest, has been hurt by a slowdown in business travel and a three-week shutdown of its lucrative shuttle operations at Washington's Reagan National Airport last month. The airline is currently operating about a third of its pre-Sept.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
AirTran Airways said yesterday that it will begin offering daily flights from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to Boston and Atlanta, giving the state-owned airport a rare bit of good news in the aftermath of terrorist attacks that have devastated the domestic travel industry. The Orlando, Fla.-based low-fare carrier will start with three flights per day to each of the two cities, helping to fill some of the gap that will be left when US Airways, the second-busiest carrier at BWI, eliminates its Baltimore-based MetroJet fleet beginning in December.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In a move that will have major ramifications for travelers in Baltimore, US Airways Group Inc. has told pilots it plans to eliminate all of its MetroJet fleet as part of a cost-cutting plan, potentially resulting in the loss of 49 of the airline's 75 daily mainline jet flights out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The news comes as the White House and Congress agreed early today on a $15 billion plan to financially bolster the airline industry in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks that has threatened the survival of some airlines.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2001
In a bid to turn around troubled US Airways, company executives unveiled yesterday a strategic plan that almost certainly will reduce the airline's presence at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The plan includes replacing larger aircraft on some main routes with 60 regional jets - which carry 30 to 70 passengers - increasing the use of larger aircraft between hub cities and key Florida destinations, and upgrading turboprop service with regional jets. "What we're doing is hauling a lot of empty seats," President and Chief Executive Officer Rakesh Gangwal told financial analysts in New York.
NEWS
June 25, 2001
Warning is issued against carrying fireworks through BWI Airport officials warn against carrying fireworks through Baltimore-Washington International Airport because the objects could be mistaken for dangerous devices at security checkpoints and cause delays. The Maryland Aviation Administration suggests that travelers present all objects that could be misidentified to airport personnel before passing the screening areas at the entrance to each concourse. The MAA, in coordination with the state fire marshal, is urging residents to refrain from transporting or using fireworks this Fourth of July holiday.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
AirTran Airways said yesterday that it will begin offering daily flights from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to Boston and Atlanta, giving the state-owned airport a rare bit of good news in the aftermath of terrorist attacks that have devastated the domestic travel industry. The Orlando, Fla.-based low-fare carrier will start with three flights per day to each of the two cities, helping to fill some of the gap that will be left when US Airways, the second-busiest carrier at BWI, eliminates its Baltimore-based MetroJet fleet beginning in December.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2000
United Airlines said yesterday that it will eliminate non-stop service to eight cities from Baltimore-Washington International Airport, including popular Florida destinations, after its proposed merger with US Airways. In addition, United said it would add a new route to Seattle and an extra flight each to Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The airline had said Wednesday that US Airways and MetroJet service at BWI would not be affected. Yesterday, a spokesman said that was an error.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
United Airlines' plans to cut MetroJet service from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to eight cities would eliminate more than half of US Airway's discount operation at the airport and a third of US Airway's total jet service. The cuts would result in a net reduction in daily flights - and possibly jobs - at the nation's second-fastest growing airport immediately after United's acquisition of US Airways, if regulators approve the $11.6 billion deal. Industry analysts say United's plans to eliminate the MetroJet routes signals its apparent decision to cede to Southwest Airlines much of the competition for budget-conscious leisure and business travelers at BWI. The eight cities being cut currently are served by 29 MetroJet flights - 58 percent of MetroJet's daily departures at BWI. MetroJet accounts for 50 of US Airways' 79 jet flights out of BWI every day. US Airways currently employs 2,085 at BWI, which also serves as a base for MetroJet's 200-plus pilots.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2000
United Airlines said yesterday that it will eliminate non-stop service to eight cities from Baltimore-Washington International Airport, including popular Florida destinations, after its proposed merger with US Airways. In addition, United said it would add a new route to Seattle and an extra flight each to Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The airline had said Wednesday that US Airways and MetroJet service at BWI would not be affected. Yesterday, a spokesman said that was an error.
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