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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Newly signed contracts for home purchases plummeted more than 30 percent in May compared with a year earlier in the Baltimore metro area, a worrisome first glimpse at how the housing market is faring without the support of an $8,000 federal tax credit for first-time buyers. Regional housing numbers released Thursday also pointed to other challenges for sellers: Average year-over-year sale prices fell nearly 3 percent, and the number of unsold homes on the market rose to an 18-month high.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Baltimore may have abandoned its "City that Reads" slogan too soon. Federal consumer spending data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that Baltimore-area residents spent an average of $154 annually on books, newspapers, magazines and other pleasure reading - about 45 percent more than the $106 national average. That's just a tiny fraction of area expenditures, but it's consistent with the profile of the wealthy, middle-aged average consumer revealed in the BLS data.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
From the Real Estate Wonk blog: Here's a snapshot of how the housing market in the Baltimore metro area looked in October: --Home sales dropped 30 percent vs. a year earlier, when buyers were rushing to get the first-time home buyer tax credit --The number of homes changing hands totaled less than 1,600, the smallest amount in the month of October for at least 12 years (that's how far back the records go) --Average prices fell just over 1 percent, to about $272,000 (though remember to take this calculation with a grain of salt)
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | May 14, 2014
A typical Baltimore-area resident is in the best position to save money compared with people living in other big metro areas, but many aren't taking advantage of that opportunity, according to an analysis by Interest.com . The site, owned by Bankrate Inc., said the typical household in the Baltimore metro area could save about $24,000 a year based on median expenses and after-tax income. That was No. 1 among 18 large regions the company analyzed. No. 2: Washington, with a "savings opportunity" of nearly $20,000.
NEWS
July 23, 1994
Although it may sound like a desperate -- to a legalistic loophole, a group of major Baltimore businesses wants to improve the region's air quality rating by combining the greater Baltimore and greater Washington areas.Under the broader identity of the combined Washington-Baltimore metropolitan area, officially recognized by the Census Bureau in 1993, the area would have only a "serious" ozone pollution problem, instead of the "severe" ozone problem ascribed to the Baltimore area alone.This downgrading would allow some 2,000 larger Baltimore employers to avoid the difficult and costly task of reducing the number of auto commuter trips made by their employees, a requirement of the federal government under the Clean Air Act for the nation's worst ozone areas.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
The number of people diagnosed with AIDS in Baltimore jumped sevenfold from 1985 through 1990, and the number of infected people in the surrounding counties more than tripled, according to statistics compiled by the state."
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 9, 1996
The number of workplace deaths in metropolitan Baltimore increased by three last year to 38, with more than a third accounted for by homicides, the U.S. Labor Department said yesterday.All but three of the 14 homicides happened in Baltimore City; the 11 homicides were among 16 total work-related deaths in the city, the report said. All but one of the work-related homicides in ,, the metro area were shootings. Overall there were 325 homicides in Baltimore City last year.Almost half of the metro-Baltimore work deaths last year occurred in the retail trade and construction sectors, the government said.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney | January 13, 1998
St. John's Prospect Hall of Frederick, USA Today's No. 1-ranked boys high school basketball team, will be one of eight teams participating in the First National Bank Charm City Classic on Jan. 30-31 at Towson Center.Two metro area schools -- No. 4 Towson Catholic and No. 7 Spalding -- will be playing, both in the Southeast bracket. The Owls will play Strake Jesuit of Houston at 3: 45 p.m. on Jan. 30, while Spalding meets St. Raymond's of New York City.The Northwest bracket will have Prospect Hall facing Newport Prep of Montgomery County, ranked No. 3 in the Washington area and featuring 6-foot-9 guard/forward DeMarr Johnson, considered to be the best junior in the nation.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Sara Gustafson says she doesn't care if she never scores another goal all season, as long as her No. 10 Franklin soccer team keeps winning.But holding the Indians' striker scoreless won't be easy for any opponent. In four games, Gustafson has tallied 14 goals to lead the metro area. She has scored or assisted on all but five of the unbeaten Indians' 21 goals.Although only a sophomore, Gustafson has had more experience than many of her teammates. A second-team All-State pick last year, she started playing at 5, has two years of Olympic Development Program experience and plays for the Columbia Soccer Club's Maryland Majestic, the current state champ.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
The first time Chandrea Jones walked onto the court in an Institute of Notre Dame uniform in December, she didn't play like a freshman. She had 29 points and 12 rebounds in a 73-72 overtime loss to Bullis Prep. "I fit in pretty good," said Jones, a versatile 5-foot-8 guard. "At first I was pretty scared, but I got used to my team and we just clicked. I felt pretty confident pretty quickly." Jones now leads the No. 2 Indians in scoring with 18.7 points a game and ranks second in the area's toughest league, the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore officials transported 37 homeless people to an emergency overflow shelter Tuesday after a heavy snowstorm struck the region. "We had 55 encounters," said Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city's Office of Emergency Management. "Eighteen refused to come with us. " The city issued a Code Blue alert Tuesday after the storm dumped up to 11 inches in parts of the Baltimore metro area, which prompted officials to open the shelter in the 200 block of Guilford Avenue. The shelter had last opened earlier this month when the polar vortex brought an extreme cold snap to the region.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
A new solar array built for a Baltimore County retirement community is among the metro area's largest, the installation firm said Tuesday. ABM Industries installed the 1.2 megawatt array on land owned by the Glen Meadows Retirement Community in Glen Arm. Washington Gas Energy Systems owns the 4,150-panel solar system and will sell the power it produces to Glen Meadows. Solar power accounts for a small percentage of Maryland electricity generation, but the number of arrays in the state are expanding quickly.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Dozens of pre-kindergartners were suspended last school year in Maryland, with the most suspensions in Baltimore, highlighting a little-known practice that some education experts say is too extreme for toddlers who are just being introduced to educational settings. The number of out-of-school suspensions in Baltimore for children ages 3 and 4 nearly doubled since the previous year to 33, according to data provided by the city school system. Some other area districts reported just a handful of pre-K suspensions in the last school year, while Anne Arundel County reported 19 and Howard County officials said they have never suspended a child that young.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Glen Burnie food products company Allied International Corp. might have a global-infused name, but it sold nothing outside the country before 2008. Now it exports to 45 countries, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the small firm's revenue. This is exactly what export proponents want to see more of in the Baltimore region - and nationally - as a way to propel economic growth. Exports accounted for an expanding but still fairly slim portion of the metro area's economic activity last year.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
River Hill senior Sheridan Street was stumped by a question recently, so she looked to teammate Alex Hamer for help. That's nothing new. Hamer, a junior, has provided Street with plenty of assists on the soccer field during the past two-plus seasons they've played together for the Hawks. But they hesitated when asked just how many goals Street had scored on those assists. "I don't know if I even want to take a guess," said Hamer as she looked to her teammate. "We don't want to say too many," Street said with laugh.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Health care now accounts for a bigger share of jobs than before the recession in all major metro areas, including Baltimore, the Brookings Institution said Monday. A report focused on health care employment shows the industry now plays a larger role in regional economies, with the number of health care jobs up nearly 23 percent to 14.5 million between the first quarter of 2003 and the first quarter of this year. During the same period, employment in other industries grew 2.1 percent, Brookings' MetroMonitor index showed.
NEWS
By Paul Farragut | January 26, 2012
When people think of Baltimore, things such as the aquarium, Camden Yards, the Ravens, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Chesapeake Bay, blue crabs and perhaps past crime shows immediately come to mind. But I believe we have another asset that is unappreciated and worthy of recognition. The Boston metro area has a thin, green, linear, 1,100-acre open space area consisting of parks, waterways and parkways that, when viewed from the air, resembles an emerald necklace. This feature is difficult for most Bostonians to visualize from ground level but is, nonetheless, a symbol of the area and a source of local pride.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
River Hill senior Sheridan Street was stumped by a question recently, so she looked to teammate Alex Hamer for help. That's nothing new. Hamer, a junior, has provided Street with plenty of assists on the soccer field during the past two-plus seasons they've played together for the Hawks. But they hesitated when asked just how many goals Street had scored on those assists. "I don't know if I even want to take a guess," said Hamer as she looked to her teammate. "We don't want to say too many," Street said with laugh.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 29, 2013
 Baltimore is the 17th fittest metropolitan area in the country, according to the latest survey by the American College of Sport Medicine's American Fitness Index. The index measures the health and community fitness status of the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The sixth annual report evaluates preventive health behaviors, levels of chronic disease conditions, health care access and community resources and policies that encourage healthy and fit lifestyles.
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