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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
After months of complaints about van services for disabled riders, the Mass Transit Administration severed a $13.9 million contract with Metro Access of Maryland yesterday and hired Yellow Van Services Inc. as a replacement.The move, which affects service to thousands of people, was cheered by advocates for the disabled -- including those who had expressed frustration with the Metro Access service this year."Metro Access was very unreliable, they left people stranded either at home waiting to get to where they needed to go, or without a ride home on a regular basis," said Nancy Weiss, executive director of TASH Inc., which represents disabled Maryland residents.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
Happy, a 78-year-old retired railroad worker only his wife knows as Robert Knight, finds out this week if Anne Arundel County has awarded him its yearly contract to drive sick people to the doctor.He probably won't get it. He never does.It's not that his Pasadena medical transport company, Happy-Go-Lucky, asks for too much money. If anything, it asks for too little. Every year, Knight bids almost $200,000 less than other companies for the $700,000 contract.He just wants to make people, especially seniors, happy, he says.
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NEWS
June 16, 1998
THE PERFORMANCE of Metro Access, which transports Anne Arundel County's sick, disabled and elderly Medicaid patients to medical appointments, needs immediate attention. There are signs of trouble -- from bounced paychecks to patients stranded in Baltimore -- that the county health department doesn't seem to be aware of.Now that the county has renewed this company's contract, the health department has an obligation to ensure that its terms -- particularly on-time provisions -- are closely followed.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
Overwhelmed by unexpected demand, the state-subsidized program that provides rides to the elderly and disabled is leaving many people throughout the metropolitan area stranded, some of them waiting hours for service.More than 1,700 such riders use Yellow Transportation's service every weekday, 300 riders a day more than last year."We never anticipated this type of demand," said Mark L. Joseph, owner of Yellow Transportation, which is paid $6.5 million a year by the Mass Transit Administration to operate the service.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
The state agency that regulates transportation is investigating the safety, maintenance and performance records of the company that Anne Arundel County has contracted with to transport sick people to medical appointments.Possible problems with the van service, Virginia-based Southeast Transit/Metro Access, emerged two weeks ago when several employees and riders complained that the company frequently violated safety guidelines, left patients stranded for hours and hid complaints about such service from the county.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Hundreds of disabled Marylanders have been left waiting -- some for hours at a time in the cold or rain -- by late or missing vans operating under a new state contract.Disabled people and their advocates say that spotty transit service in metropolitan Baltimore has placed many blind, paralyzed, sick or elderly riders in potentially dangerous situations in the past month.Some have missed kidney dialysis or other crucial medical appointments, have been unable to take medicine on time or have been forced to wait outside for long periods, risking health and safety, they say."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Hundreds of disabled Marylanders have been left waiting -- some for hours at a time in the cold or rain -- by late or missing vans operating under a new state contract.Disabled people and their advocates say that spotty transit service in metropolitan Baltimore has placed many blind, paralyzed, sick or elderly riders in potentially dangerous situations in the past month.Some have missed kidney dialysis or other crucial medical appointments, have been unable to take medicine on time or have been forced to wait outside for long periods, risking health and safety, they say."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
Baltimore's Board of Estimates yesterday awarded a nearly $3 million contract to Yellow Van Service Inc. to transport seriously disabled patients to medical appointments after city officials questioned whether a competing bidder was capable of providing the services.Yellow Van's bid of $2,999,264 was $29,383 higher than that of Metro Access of Maryland Inc. But officials of the city's purchasing and health departments said Metro Access lacked enough properly certified vans and drivers. They also said they had received several unsolicited letters complaining about Metro's performance on a separate state contract to provide transportation for the disabled.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
The Anne Arundel County Health Department has renewed a lucrative contract with a medical transport company despite complaints from sick people that they have been stranded at doctors' offices and from workers that they haven't been paid.This week, several employees of the Alexandria, Va.-based Southeast Transit/Metro Access walked off their jobs when their paychecks bounced, leaving about 10 county patients without a ride to kidney dialysis treatments.Some workers said this was the fourth time in a row they had been left hanging by Metro Access, which has signed a new $720,000 contract with the county that goes into effect July 1.About a dozen lawsuits are pending in courts in Baltimore and in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties alleging that Metro Access has failed to pay bills, promoted dangerous driving and has not followed safety guidelines for passengers.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1998
Publicized complaints about a medical transport firm have prompted the Anne Arundel County Health Department officials to "take a closer look" at Southeast Transit/Metro Access, they say, though they remain convinced the firm is performing satisfactorily.The department's response Friday fell short of what was wanted by some patients, employees and county officials who called for a full investigation into the company. They have accused Metro Access of leaving patients needing rides to wait for hours, failing to pay staff on time and punishing them for revealing shortcomings of the operation.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
The state agency that regulates transportation is investigating the safety, maintenance and performance records of the company that Anne Arundel County has contracted with to transport sick people to medical appointments.Possible problems with the van service, Virginia-based Southeast Transit/Metro Access, emerged two weeks ago when several employees and riders complained that the company frequently violated safety guidelines, left patients stranded for hours and hid complaints about such service from the county.
NEWS
June 16, 1998
THE PERFORMANCE of Metro Access, which transports Anne Arundel County's sick, disabled and elderly Medicaid patients to medical appointments, needs immediate attention. There are signs of trouble -- from bounced paychecks to patients stranded in Baltimore -- that the county health department doesn't seem to be aware of.Now that the county has renewed this company's contract, the health department has an obligation to ensure that its terms -- particularly on-time provisions -- are closely followed.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1998
Publicized complaints about a medical transport firm have prompted the Anne Arundel County Health Department officials to "take a closer look" at Southeast Transit/Metro Access, they say, though they remain convinced the firm is performing satisfactorily.The department's response Friday fell short of what was wanted by some patients, employees and county officials who called for a full investigation into the company. They have accused Metro Access of leaving patients needing rides to wait for hours, failing to pay staff on time and punishing them for revealing shortcomings of the operation.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
The Anne Arundel County Health Department has renewed a lucrative contract with a medical transport company despite complaints from sick people that they have been stranded at doctors' offices and from workers that they haven't been paid.This week, several employees of the Alexandria, Va.-based Southeast Transit/Metro Access walked off their jobs when their paychecks bounced, leaving about 10 county patients without a ride to kidney dialysis treatments.Some workers said this was the fourth time in a row they had been left hanging by Metro Access, which has signed a new $720,000 contract with the county that goes into effect July 1.About a dozen lawsuits are pending in courts in Baltimore and in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties alleging that Metro Access has failed to pay bills, promoted dangerous driving and has not followed safety guidelines for passengers.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
After months of complaints about van services for disabled riders, the Mass Transit Administration severed a $13.9 million contract with Metro Access of Maryland yesterday and hired Yellow Van Services Inc. as a replacement.The move, which affects service to thousands of people, was cheered by advocates for the disabled -- including those who had expressed frustration with the Metro Access service this year."Metro Access was very unreliable, they left people stranded either at home waiting to get to where they needed to go, or without a ride home on a regular basis," said Nancy Weiss, executive director of TASH Inc., which represents disabled Maryland residents.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
Baltimore's Board of Estimates yesterday awarded a nearly $3 million contract to Yellow Van Service Inc. to transport seriously disabled patients to medical appointments after city officials questioned whether a competing bidder was capable of providing the services.Yellow Van's bid of $2,999,264 was $29,383 higher than that of Metro Access of Maryland Inc. But officials of the city's purchasing and health departments said Metro Access lacked enough properly certified vans and drivers. They also said they had received several unsolicited letters complaining about Metro's performance on a separate state contract to provide transportation for the disabled.
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