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NEWS
By Kansas City Star | February 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Nancy L. Kassebaum vows to be dragged into the 21st century inch by inch, not centimeter by centimeter.She and two Republican colleagues from Kansas last week introduced bills to block a plan to replace all highway signs in the United States with signs listing distances and speed limits in metric units by October 1996."
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NEWS
October 17, 2013
I have to agree with Howard County Board of Education member Ann De Lacys' comment that even with the Common Core, we are still teaching to the test. A sentiment shared by board member Brian Mishkin, who was quoted in the same article on Oct. 10 as saying "it's patently unfair to students to teach them for one test but test another. " I disagree with the reporters' statement that teachers are now more responsible for students' learning than ever before. For her information, student learning has always been the responsibility of the classroom teacher.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
The Aluminum Co. of America will reduce production at its Eastalco Works plant in Frederick, causing 150 layoffs and early retirements, the company said yesterday.The job reductions, some of which already have occurred, should be completed by February, said Earl Robbins, Eastalco's public and government affairs manager.Eastalco produces 174,000 metric tons of aluminum a year, but that will be scaled back to 144,000 metric tons. Other Alcoa plants will absorb the 30,000-metric-ton load, he said.
NEWS
December 19, 2012
The new system for measuring school progress announced by the Maryland State Department of Education this week is being touted as a great advance over the one it replaces. State officials say the School Progress Index aims to cut in half the percentage of students who fail to score proficient or better on standardized tests by 2017 and that it sets more realistic targets for what schools can achieve. Yet its complexity and the lack of transparency regarding how school performance is calculated are enough to raise questions about whether the new system really represents much of an improvement over the old. Maryland developed the School Progress Index in order to receive a federal waiver from the requirements of the Bush-era federal No Child Left Behind Act. Under that law, schools were judged to be failing if they didn't make "adequate yearly progress" in boosting test scores in reading and math, leading toward 100 percent proficiency in both subjects by 2014.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 1995
Three years after Russia agreed to provide the United States with uranium from scrapped Russian nuclear weapons, the deal is unraveling, prompting a quiet struggle to save the accord, federal and private experts say.Russia was to get $12 billion in desperately needed hard currency, and the United States was to get 500 metric tons of bomb-grade uranium, which was to be diluted to make fuel for American nuclear power plants and ultimately electricity for...
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2002
Duratek Inc. said yesterday that it has won part of a $558 million contract with the Department of Energy to convert depleted uranium hexaflouride, a byproduct of weapons production, into a chemical that can safely be reused or disposed of. The Columbia-based company and two other firms will design, build and operate facilities in Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, where the uranium will be converted into triuranium octoxide. The companies will also be responsible for maintaining the uranium and converted triuranium octoxide.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 1, 2006
Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine agreed yesterday to comply with a regional plan to prevent any increase in fishing for menhaden, a species viewed as important to the Chesapeake Bay's health. Kaine's decision means that the main company harvesting the fish in the bay, Omega Protein, is expected to have to limit its catch to 109,020 metric tons a year, state officials said. Omega manufactures fish oil at a plant in Reedville, Va. Menhaden, oily fish about the size of a hot dog, are not served in restaurants or kitchens but are a key source of food for striped bass and other larger fish, and they help filter the Chesapeake Bay. The menhaden population is thought to have fallen over the past decade, and environmentalists have pushed for protections or a ban on harvesting them.
NEWS
December 15, 1990
MOSCOW (AP) -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev acted yesterday to try to restore order to the chaotic Soviet economy, nullifying decisions by the republics and local authorities that have disrupted food supplies.He also decreed that government enterprises must carry out all contracts through the rest of this year and the first quarter of 1991 to ensure a steady flow of supplies.His move represented a crackdown on regions that have broken the discipline that for years has guided the Soviet Union's command economy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Responding to strong domestic pressure to cut foreign assistance, the Clinton administration has cut nearly in half the nation's annual pledge of overseas food aid, which had remained unchanged for two decades.Noting that the developing world's food demands are rising every year, the 15-nation European Union has criticized the U.S. move, suggesting that the United States is breaking its international commitments.Administration officials confirmed last week that the United States had outlined plans to reduce its aid levels at a March 13 meeting of the Food Aid Convention, an organization of about 20 donor nations that includes Japan and the European Union.
NEWS
By Frank P.L. Somerville and Frank P.L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Marylanders continued their support of humanitarian aid to Rwanda yesterday as Catholic Relief Services ceremoniously loaded a truck with food in downtown Baltimore and started it on its way to Africa.After a midday program of speeches in Charles Center Plaza, initiating a fund-raising effort called "Baltimore Sends Hope to Rwanda," a CRS spokesman said that the truckload of 20 metric tons of corn meal purchased in Nebraska was taken to Baltimore-Washington International Airport, from which a British Airways flight transported the food to London.
EXPLORE
November 13, 2012
The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. on Mondays. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). We do not accept results by phone. When two Howard County teams play, players from both teams (first and last names) must be mentioned in the write-up. Questions? Call 410-332-6606. Running Howard County Striders The Howard County Striders staged the 36th Metric Marathon (26.2 km) Nov 11. The race began in Columbia, than made its way to Ellicott City and back.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Maryland energy regulators on Thursday approved the publication of proposed reliability standards for state utilities in the Maryland Register for public comment. The Public Service Commission this week tweaked proposed standards that would establish specific electric reliability performance standards for each of the state's utilities, including Baltimore Gas and Electric. They would also set rules for tree trimming and customer service performance and require greater accountability.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
Submitting sports notices The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. Monday. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). Questions? Call 410-332-6578. Running The Howard County Striders will hold their 35th annual Metric Marathon (26.2k/16.3 miles) and Metric 5k Nov. 13. The races start in Columbia Town Center at 8:15 a.m. Cost: $35 for the 26k and $30 for the 5k. Race day registration is $5 extra. Register at active.com. Email metricmarathon@gmail.com .   Soccer   The Draganov School of Soccer will hold a Winter Indoor 4v4 Soccer program at the Howard Community College gymnasium.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | September 7, 2008
Now that we have our presidential candidates and their respective running mates, it is time to get down to business and stop beating the tired, old horses of ageism, sexism and racism, and start whipping the old goat of serious issues. Yes, it is time our candidates addressed one of the more pressing concerns facing our nation: Why are we not using the metric system, already? For crying out loud! When I was in grade school, back in the day when lunch boxes actually were metal boxes and the bologna sandwich inside was not a thing to be ashamed of, I learned about the English measurement system.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 1, 2006
Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine agreed yesterday to comply with a regional plan to prevent any increase in fishing for menhaden, a species viewed as important to the Chesapeake Bay's health. Kaine's decision means that the main company harvesting the fish in the bay, Omega Protein, is expected to have to limit its catch to 109,020 metric tons a year, state officials said. Omega manufactures fish oil at a plant in Reedville, Va. Menhaden, oily fish about the size of a hot dog, are not served in restaurants or kitchens but are a key source of food for striped bass and other larger fish, and they help filter the Chesapeake Bay. The menhaden population is thought to have fallen over the past decade, and environmentalists have pushed for protections or a ban on harvesting them.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
A commission representing 15 Eastern states voted yesterday to impose a limit on the fishing of menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay to prevent excessive harvesting and ecological harm. Menhaden, an oily fish about the size of a cigar, is a primary food for striped bass and other larger fish and one of the few remaining filter feeders that help clean the bay's waters. The 12-2 vote by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission means that the annual catch will be limited to about 105,000 metric tons of menhaden annually for five years beginning in 2006.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994
Deal boosts aluminum stocksAluminum stocks rose yesterday after a weekend agreement by major aluminum-producing nations to cut annual production by 1 million metric tons, or roughly 5 percent of world output.Aluminum prices have been depressed by a huge world surplus, caused largely by rising exports from the former Soviet republics. Under the accord, Russia agreed to cut 500,000 metric tons of production this year in exchange for financial and technical assistance from Western nations.Xerox posts $577 million lossXerox Corp.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
A commission representing 15 Eastern states voted yesterday to impose a limit on the fishing of menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay to prevent excessive harvesting and ecological harm. Menhaden, an oily fish about the size of a cigar, is a primary food for striped bass and other larger fish and one of the few remaining filter feeders that help clean the bay's waters. The 12-2 vote by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission means that the annual catch will be limited to about 105,000 metric tons of menhaden annually for five years beginning in 2006.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2003
Some Delmarva poultry producers say they are still being frozen out of the Russian food market despite an agreement to end a year-old dispute over sanitary conditions at U.S. processing plants. Russia's Ministry of Agriculture contends that 76 of the 341 U.S. poultry-processing and storage facilities that it inspected in the past year don't meet standards for cleanliness, denying some producers the opportunity to ship to Russian customers. Another 93 were given approval if they meet certain conditions.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 29, 2003
It was about 18 months ago in a dreary Annapolis cafeteria that anglers and state fisheries biologists talked about the equally dismal state of the flounder population. Things, we were told, were not looking good. Crummy, in fact. Flounder pounders would just have to wait for the stock to replenish itself. Reaching a spawning biomass of 53,200 metric tons was critical. "We have a long way to go until flounder reach that target," warned Phil Jones of the Department of Natural Resources.
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