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By JOSH MEYER and JOSH MEYER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The State Department's annual report on global terrorism released yesterday concludes that the number of reported terrorist incidents and deaths has increased exponentially in the three years since the United States invaded Iraq, largely because of Iraq itself. The report also said that while the United States has made some gains in fighting terrorism, al-Qaida and its affiliate groups remain a grave threat to U.S. national security at home and abroad - both in Iraq and elsewhere.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 2011
The Baltimore Sun partnered with WorkplaceDynamics, a Philadelphia-based HR metrics firm, to determine the region's top workplaces. Beginning in June, The Sun ran articles and advertisements encouraging employees in the region to nominate their companies as top workplaces. WorkplaceDynamics then invited those companies, as well as other organizations in the region, to participate in the program. Anyone could nominate a company. The sole requirement was that the organization employ at least 50 people in the Baltimore metro area.
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NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | October 16, 2006
It's very simple: I basically create things that I need myself. It just so happens that sometimes other people want to use that." - JAWAD KARIM, 27, one of the creators of YouTube, a Web site that allows users around the world to share videos, and a chief architect of PayPal, the leading online payment service, explains his creative methodology; Google last week agreed to acquire YouTube for $1.65 billion in stock
NEWS
By Steve Raabe, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
OpinionWorks completed 798 telephone interviews Oct. 15-20 among likely general election voters across Maryland. According to customary statistical standards, this sample produces a margin of error of no more than 3.5 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level. This means that 95 percent of the time, the "true" figure would fall within this range if every likely general election voter in Maryland had been interviewed. Margin of sampling error is only one of many potential sources of error in this or any other public opinion survey.
NEWS
August 17, 1991
Columbia's Oakland Ridge Industrial Center has a new tenant -- Straight Inc., an often-controversial, Florida-based substance abuse program. Inside the newly occupied quarters, about 70 youthful clients, most with middle-class and upper-class backgrounds from North Carolina to Delaware, go through a seven-day-a-week hell of confronting drug or alcohol addiction. Separation from parents (except in structured situations) and peer confrontation, pressure and support are hallmarks of Straight's unorthodox methodology -- by all accounts, a grueling, soul-searing process.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | October 21, 2001
IN PICKING a new fund for the Roth IRA this year, I realized that the way I pick funds has changed again. It's no big deal, just a further refinement of a process that changes as I learn more. I first described my personal methodology for picking a fund shortly after I began writing this column in 1994. The changes over time have been on the margins, not at the core of my investment philosophy. But investors' long-term happiness with a fund often traces back to what they were thinking when they first bought it, so finding a comfortable method for choosing funds is smart.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | May 23, 2004
LILLIAN, of Metairie, La., sent me a 10-year-old clipping last week, a copy of a column I wrote on how I pick mutual funds. Her attached note was very simple: "After everything that has happened, do you still pick funds this way?" "Everything that has happened," of course, are the improper trading troubles that have caused the fund industry's biggest scandal ever. Since I first described my personal methodology for picking a fund in 1994, I have made some marginal changes to my investment philosophy, but the fund scandals are reflected in only one small way. Investors' long-term happiness with a fund is often traced to what they thought when they first bought it, which is why it's crucial to develop a personal selection system.
NEWS
January 3, 1998
Small-time arrests little cause for joyWere we supposed to be thrilled by the arrest of 39 people in police drug sweep operation? I wasn't. My room mate wasn't.In the past year in our Canton neighborhood, he's had his car window smashed three times and I've had my car broken into once as well. Nearly every night, I hear a car alarm in the distance. It happens so often that when the alarm went off in my roommate's car, we ignored it at first.When I hear that there was ''a police officer on every corner'' just to catch a few losers who have a drug problem, it makes me angry.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1991 TPG Communications | April 22, 1991
Managers get paid to make judgments. Human judgment stinks. Add those two statements up and you've got trouble."Judgment Under Uncertainty," edited by professors Daniel Kahneman, Paul Slovic and Amos Tversky, is a revelation. In 555 well-documented pages, they present a persuasive case for the unreliability of judgment:* Anchoring. Take a simple case. Subjects were given a multiplication to perform: One set got 8x7x6x5x4x3x2x1; another, 1x2x3x4x5x6x7x8. The two are clearly equivalent. The catch: Subjects had five seconds to make an estimate.
NEWS
August 7, 2009
Sonia Sotomayor's confirmation to the Supreme Court yesterday demonstrated that no amount of smoke, mirrors and parsing of 8-year-old speeches was ever going to derail a nominee with strong qualifications, 17 years of experience on the bench and, perhaps most importantly, mainstream moderate views. It helped considerably that Judge Sotomayor's appointment is not going to tip the ideological balance of the court, as her views seem to generally mirror those of retiring Justice David Souter, a Republican appointee.
NEWS
August 7, 2009
Sonia Sotomayor's confirmation to the Supreme Court yesterday demonstrated that no amount of smoke, mirrors and parsing of 8-year-old speeches was ever going to derail a nominee with strong qualifications, 17 years of experience on the bench and, perhaps most importantly, mainstream moderate views. It helped considerably that Judge Sotomayor's appointment is not going to tip the ideological balance of the court, as her views seem to generally mirror those of retiring Justice David Souter, a Republican appointee.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 16, 2007
Five seconds more and I would have bought that camera. But as I prepared to click my mouse to approve the purchase online - an act that always gives me an anxious Dr. Strangelove sensation of commencing war on my wallet with the push of a button - I scrolled down the screen and was stopped in my tracks. What caught my eye was an excerpt from a user review trashing that particular camera. The person commenting might have been a crackpot and the criticism offbase, but the fervor of it caused me to hesitate and hunt around the Web a little more.
NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | October 16, 2006
It's very simple: I basically create things that I need myself. It just so happens that sometimes other people want to use that." - JAWAD KARIM, 27, one of the creators of YouTube, a Web site that allows users around the world to share videos, and a chief architect of PayPal, the leading online payment service, explains his creative methodology; Google last week agreed to acquire YouTube for $1.65 billion in stock
NEWS
By JOSH MEYER and JOSH MEYER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The State Department's annual report on global terrorism released yesterday concludes that the number of reported terrorist incidents and deaths has increased exponentially in the three years since the United States invaded Iraq, largely because of Iraq itself. The report also said that while the United States has made some gains in fighting terrorism, al-Qaida and its affiliate groups remain a grave threat to U.S. national security at home and abroad - both in Iraq and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 30, 2005
No matter how much market news you watch or how many books you read, the best way to learn about investing is to, well, invest. But it's easy to feel overwhelmed when you first approach the market, and many of us lack the spare cash to buy individual stocks. That's why an investment club can be a good place to start. Numbering in the thousands today, investment clubs are small groups (typically about 15 people) that meet monthly to study investing principles and pool money to buy stocks, sort of like a mutual fund.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | December 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - The International Committee of the Red Cross has accused the United States of torturing enemy combatant prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, according to documents leaked to The New York Times. Does that mean U.S. interrogators are sticking needles under inmates' fingernails and attaching electrodes to sensitive body parts? Or are they merely beating prisoners senseless? Hardly. The ICRC report hasn't been made public, but a memorandum summarizing its contents describes far less egregious behavior.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 16, 2007
Five seconds more and I would have bought that camera. But as I prepared to click my mouse to approve the purchase online - an act that always gives me an anxious Dr. Strangelove sensation of commencing war on my wallet with the push of a button - I scrolled down the screen and was stopped in my tracks. What caught my eye was an excerpt from a user review trashing that particular camera. The person commenting might have been a crackpot and the criticism offbase, but the fervor of it caused me to hesitate and hunt around the Web a little more.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | September 3, 1991
WHEN YOU'RE not rich, you buy everything on sale, right?You buy snow tires in July, leather boots in March, bathing suits in September. We once bought a half-price canoe in January, and by the time the waters were ice-free we'd paid it off.Well, we just bought a barbecue grill -- big pre-Labor Day sale.Ah, no more matches, no more lighter fluid and no more trauma. I rejoiced. It's a gas-fired grill.No more yelling from the kitchen window as I shucked the corn and tossed a salad, issuing commands like -- ''Stand back from the grill, hon, please, you're too near!
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | May 23, 2004
LILLIAN, of Metairie, La., sent me a 10-year-old clipping last week, a copy of a column I wrote on how I pick mutual funds. Her attached note was very simple: "After everything that has happened, do you still pick funds this way?" "Everything that has happened," of course, are the improper trading troubles that have caused the fund industry's biggest scandal ever. Since I first described my personal methodology for picking a fund in 1994, I have made some marginal changes to my investment philosophy, but the fund scandals are reflected in only one small way. Investors' long-term happiness with a fund is often traced to what they thought when they first bought it, which is why it's crucial to develop a personal selection system.
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