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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 3, 1998
Three families were evacuated from their homes in the Elkridge area yesterday after Howard County fire officials discovered explosive levels of methane in the houses.The gas readings were so high that a pilot light for a water heater or stove could have caused an explosion in the houses, which are in an affluent neighborhood in the 7000 block of Calvert Drive, said Capt. Chris Shimer of Howard County Fire and Rescue Services.The methane was detected after a resident smelled gas and called BGE.BGE found readings of potentially explosive levels of methane and called 911 about 3: 15 p.m.About 30 houses in the neighborhood were tested for methane (( and all but three were found safe, Shimer said.
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NEWS
Donald C. Helm | October 31, 2013
Large-scale plans for hydraulic fracturing and natural gas export in Maryland have recently been set in motion. From my vantage point as a scientist, let me point to clear dangers in hydrofracking. A physical process occurs that is overlooked by methane gas developers. This overlooked process is the upward migration of fractures from depth. A breakthrough in understanding this physical process came with the publication of an award winning paper entitled "Hydraulic forces that play a role in generating fissures at depth" by D.C. Helm, published in the Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
Fort Meade will pump methane gas from an Anne Arundel County landfill to generate electricity at the growing Army post under a tentative deal announced yesterday, three months after the talks appeared to have collapsed. The terms of the agreement, which a county spokeswoman characterized as in the "verbal preliminary stages," call for Fort Meade to buy the methane gas from the Millersville landfill. The fort and its contractors will foot the bill for the design and construction of a five-mile pipeline and other infrastructure needed for the collection and use of the methane gas. "This is a win-win partnership for all the parties concerned," Col. Kenneth O McCreedy, the post commander, said in a statement.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 24, 2013
A new study finds residential wells more likely to be contaminated when near drilling for natural gas using hydraulic fracturing. Researchers led by Duke University 's Robert Jackson report that although the vast majority of wells checked in northeastern Pennsylvania and southeastern New York had methane in them, those within one kilometer of gas drilling sites had six times more of the gas, on average, than residential wells farther away....
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DENNIS O'BRIEN and FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTERS | January 4, 2006
Although there's no official explanation yet for Monday's explosion in West Virginia's Sago coal mine, experts say a dangerous accumulation of methane gas is high on the list of suspects. Methane is a colorless, odorless gas composed of carbon and hydrogen (CH4). The primary component of the so-called "natural gas" that heats homes and cooks food, it forms deep in the Earth as part of the same process that converts organic material to coal over millions of years. Methane is typically dissolved in deep groundwater.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | November 14, 2007
In a deal that could benefit Baltimore's air quality and its bottom line, city officials said yesterday that they will soon capture methane gas from a landfill and sell it to the Coast Guard as a source of energy. The 16,000 tons of methane generated by the Quarantine Road Landfill annually will be pumped to the Coast Guard Yard, which will use the gas to light and heat its 112-acre facility on Hawkins Point Road in Curtis Bay - reducing its reliance on traditional energy sources. Several local governments across the country and in Maryland - including Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties - are looking at ways not only to reuse methane, which is a greenhouse gas, but also to turn what gas they collect into a revenue source.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Justin Fenton and Phillip McGowan and Justin Fenton,Sun reporters | November 2, 2007
Officials from Anne Arundel County and Fort Meade say discussions about using methane gas from the Millersville Landfill as a power source for the Army post have reached an impasse, nearly 13 months after they announced a partnership to help provide a new energy source to serve a huge expansion there. Col. Kenneth O. McCreedy, Fort Meade's commander, confirmed differences regarding the "economics" of building a five-mile, $9 million pipeline and directing natural gas from the landfill to the post.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
An Elkridge family forced from its home last week because of high levels of methane gas moved back Saturday after fire officials tested the home and found no evidence of gas.Three other families who moved out a month ago from a neighboring subdivision because of methane have not returned. The cause of the problem in both subdivisions has not been determined, according to the home builder.Chris and Danette Riviello and their daughter Emily, 7, left their home in the Marshalee Woods subdivision Sept.
NEWS
October 2, 1998
WHAT HAS happened to four families evacuated from new houses saturated with explosive methane gas in Howard County's Elkridge seems unreal. It is not as if methane is a rarity in central Maryland. Older houses have to be inspected for the odorless, colorless, flammable gas before they can be sold.Developers should know before they drive the first nail whether the land on which they are building might have a methane problem.In this case, the builder says it was unaware of illegal dumping that some old-timers contend occurred in a gravel pit on the property.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
Pushing the Hubble Space Telescope to its limits, astronomers say they have made the first discovery of the organic molecule methane in the atmosphere of a planet circling a sun-like star. Although methane can be generated by cows and rotting garbage, scientists say there's little chance that they've stumbled on signs of life on the planet, about 63 light-years from Earth. The Jupiter-size world's atmosphere sizzles at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit. But their apparent success in detecting the gas so far away gives them confidence that they'll be able to find it again someday on a smaller, cooler planet circling a different star.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 8, 2012
An industry group is accusing the Chesapeake Bay Foundation of misrepresenting the facts in a video investigation the environmental group released last fall purporting to show natural gas wells and processing facilities spewing invisible plumes of pollution into the air. Energy in Depth , an arm of the Independent Petroleum Association of America , says the plumes captured on CBF's video using an infrared camera are not surreptitious releases...
EXPLORE
December 5, 2011
Howard County officials have requested a permit from the state to operate an internal combustion engine that burns the methane gas from the Alpha Ridge landfill to generate electricity with investment at almost $4 million. It is a fact that using internal combustion engines to produce electricity from landfill gas is more polluting than currently used flaring. Mercury, dioxins and furans are some of the most toxic chemicals known to science and are human carcinogens. Burning gas doesn't "destroy" it, but can change it into a different set of pollutants.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
In an article about natural gas drilling ("Md. environment chief wants more U.S. oversight of fracking," April 13), The Sun's John Fritze reports that to "extract natural gas through fracking, companies use millions of gallons of liquids," but that explanation is inadequate. Anyone interested in information about fracking for gas extraction should watch the HBO documentary, "Gasland," or drive up to Bradford County, Penn. and see the devastating results of this process. Toxic chemicals are pumped into the ground with water and sand to force the gas up. Sixty-five of the chemicals used are considered dangerous to human health.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 16, 2009
Wiretaps limited only inside U.S., court rules WASHINGTON: The government does not need a search warrant when it taps the phones or checks the e-mails of suspected terrorists who are outside the U.S., even if Americans might be overheard on these calls, a special intelligence court ruled in an opinion released yesterday. The decision confirms what Bush administration officials and some legal experts have long said: While the Constitution protects privacy rights of Americans against "unreasonable searches and seizures," this principle does not bar U.S. spy agencies from conducting surveillance aimed at foreign targets abroad.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
With the push of a button, Baltimore set a course yesterday to save up to $2.4 million by using waste to treat waste. Until yesterday morning, gas - mostly methane - produced at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in East Baltimore was vented and burned in 20-foot flares that could be seen miles away. Now those flames have been extinguished.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
Pushing the Hubble Space Telescope to its limits, astronomers say they have made the first discovery of the organic molecule methane in the atmosphere of a planet circling a sun-like star. Although methane can be generated by cows and rotting garbage, scientists say there's little chance that they've stumbled on signs of life on the planet, about 63 light-years from Earth. The Jupiter-size world's atmosphere sizzles at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit. But their apparent success in detecting the gas so far away gives them confidence that they'll be able to find it again someday on a smaller, cooler planet circling a different star.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 8, 2012
An industry group is accusing the Chesapeake Bay Foundation of misrepresenting the facts in a video investigation the environmental group released last fall purporting to show natural gas wells and processing facilities spewing invisible plumes of pollution into the air. Energy in Depth , an arm of the Independent Petroleum Association of America , says the plumes captured on CBF's video using an infrared camera are not surreptitious releases...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
Fort Meade will pump methane gas from an Anne Arundel County landfill to generate electricity at the growing Army post under a tentative deal announced yesterday, three months after the talks appeared to have collapsed. The terms of the agreement, which a county spokeswoman characterized as in the "verbal preliminary stages," call for Fort Meade to buy the methane gas from the Millersville landfill. The fort and its contractors will foot the bill for the design and construction of a five-mile pipeline and other infrastructure needed for the collection and use of the methane gas. "This is a win-win partnership for all the parties concerned," Col. Kenneth O McCreedy, the post commander, said in a statement.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | November 14, 2007
In a deal that could benefit Baltimore's air quality and its bottom line, city officials said yesterday that they will soon capture methane gas from a landfill and sell it to the Coast Guard as a source of energy. The 16,000 tons of methane generated by the Quarantine Road Landfill annually will be pumped to the Coast Guard Yard, which will use the gas to light and heat its 112-acre facility on Hawkins Point Road in Curtis Bay - reducing its reliance on traditional energy sources. Several local governments across the country and in Maryland - including Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties - are looking at ways not only to reuse methane, which is a greenhouse gas, but also to turn what gas they collect into a revenue source.
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