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NEWS
November 14, 1990
Graveside services for Frank Benson Lipps, a meteorologist, will be held at 11:30 a.m. today at Loudon Park Cemetery, 3801 Frederick Ave.Dr. Lipps, who was 57 and lived in Trenton, N.J., died Friday of cancer at a hospital there.He was born in Baltimore and graduated from the Johns Hopkins University, where he also obtained his doctorate before doing postdoctoral work in Stockholm, Sweden.He was a member of the staff of the Forrestal Center, a research facility in Princeton, N.J.He is survived by a brother, Dr. Frederick W. Lipps of Bellaire, Texas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Nearly four inches of rain fell in the span of one hour at BWI on Tuesday, an event that can be expected to occur only once every 500 to 1,000 years, according to the National Weather Service. What weather service meteorologists called an "incredible" 3.91 inches fell between 12:29 p.m. and 1:32 p.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, they wrote in a forecaster's discussion Wednesday. There is a 0.1 percent chance of that much rain falling in an hour at BWI during any given year, weather service hydrologist Jason Elliott wrote.
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NEWS
October 16, 1995
A meteorologist for the National Weather Service confirmed yesterday what Anne Arundel County residents had suspected: A small but intense tornado cut a narrow swath through the community of Arnold Saturday night.The twister, which ranged from 50 to 100 yards wide, packed winds of up to 95 miles an hour and vanished two miles and 4 minutes after it touched down in the development of Belvedere Heights, said Barry Goldsmith, an official from NWS headquarters in Sterling, Va., who toured the area yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials said they had restored nearly all the outages associated with Wednesday's ice storm by Saturday morning, but were contacting some customers who will enter a fourth day without electricity. Winds weighing on weakened branches added 10,000 outages Wednesday and Thursday nights, on top of those outages that immediately followed the ice storm, for a total of 182,000 outages since early Wednesday morning. Outages had fallen to about 2,800 by 9 a.m. Saturday, most of them in Baltimore and Carroll counties.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
David J. Weinbrenner, a National Weather Service meteorologist, died of a heart attack Sunday at his Millersville home. He was 63. Mr. Weinbrenner was born and raised in Yonkers, N.Y., and earned his bachelor's degree in meteorology from New York University in 1964. He began his career with the U.S. Weather Bureau that year as a forecaster in New York City. He later transferred to the Hydrometerological Prediction Center at the National Centers for Environment Prediction in Camp Hill.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | January 24, 1992
When most people are wondering if it might rain, Brian Mark Weber isgetting out his slicker.The 22-year-old meteorologist tracks theweather 24 hours a day from his home in Long Point, watching clouds and cold fronts -- even plants."
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Winter skiing, springtime on the links, summer sailing and autumn leaf-peeping - the weather forecast is the driving force behind the planning of many vacations. But when it comes to predicting the weather, WBAL meteorologist Tony Pann takes it all in stride. Pann grew up in the blustery, changeable climate of Chicago, and has since delivered the weather report for television stations in New York and Washington, as well as Baltimore. "I've seen it all," he says good-naturedly.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
It should be enough that Veronica Johnson, an on-air meteorologist for WMAR-TV, has to look great at 5: 30 a.m. Add to that task the fact that she is the mother of three, including a 2-month-old son. How does she do it?By making a science out of dressing for work.Her lab is a color-coordinated closet with a 12-foot ladder that reaches up to boxes of sweaters and shoes."I ordered that ladder, and my husband didn't know how tall it was going to be until he looked in the closet," Johnson says.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Channel 2 meteorologist Norm Lewis steps into the brightly lighted room, takes a deep breath and narrows his focus. For the next several minutes, accuracy is the only thing on his mind. Working methodically, Lewis delivers -- not a forecast, but a quiver full of arrows. And while his TV delivery has earned him fans, his archery prowess has brought national and regional recognition in the past year. Lewis, 56, is the outdoor national champion in his age group and shooting style. Last month, he finished second in his class and style in the indoor world and national championships held jointly in Tulsa, Okla.
NEWS
June 15, 2004
Today, The Sun welcomes WBAL-TV 11 chief meteorologist Tom Tasselmyer to its weather page. Tasselmyer and the WBAL weather team will provide readers of The Sun with the local and regional forecasts seven days a week. Additionally, WBAL and The Sun begin a new feature on the page where Tasselmyer will answer readers' weather-related questions. If you have a question for Tasselmyer, you can reach him at asktom@baltimoresun.com.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The region has had its first flirt with winter weather this week, and now meteorologists are handicapping whether the upcoming season could be the snowiest since 2009-2010, or another dud. In general, Baltimore's snowiest winters occur when high-pressure systems park over Greenland, blocking Arctic air and moisture and sending it further south across the Northeast and mid-Atlantic U.S. This is most common when the climate phenomenon El Nino is...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
The National Weather Service's Baltimore/Washington forecast office was still evaluating surveyed damage Wednesday afternoon from storms that swept through northern Maryland on Tuesday morning. A weather service meteorologist visited areas where the storm hit and found some damage, though not a significant amount, said Jared Klein, a meteorologist at the Sterling, Va., office. "There was some localized damage," Klein said, noting a large tree that was downed in Havre de Grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | August 13, 2013
Miri Marshall, a weathercaster at KCEN-TV in central Texas, will join WBAL-TV Aug. 22, as part of the station's weather team, general manager Dan Joerres said Tuesday. Marshall fills a role that became vacant when meterologist John Collins retired as a full-time staffer at the end of May, after 24 years at the station. Collins still has a freelance relationship with WBAL-TV, according to Joerres. "Miri has a lot of personality, a lot of energy on-air," Joerres said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Noel Levy | July 4, 2013
Having lived in Baltimore for two decades, I've noticed an increased intensity of the storms we've had in just the last few years. From Hurricane Sandy to last summer's derecho, extreme weather is causing huge power outages and putting peoples' lives and property in danger. It is now well-established that overheated air and water, caused by the burning of fossil fuels and other pollution, is having influencing our weather patterns. When I turn on the local television news, I expect to hear accurate reporting on these trends.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Forecasters are watching an expected outbreak of severe weather from Illinois to Maryland that some are likening to last June's derecho; one meteorologist predicted it would be a "multi billion dollar storm" causing massive power outages. Storms were developing in Illinois and Wisconsin early Wednesday evening, bringing tornado threats from there through Indiana and into Ohio. Meteorologists say conditions could be conducive for those storms to strengthen into a massive squall line packing up to 70 mph winds, large hail and heavy rain.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Winter skiing, springtime on the links, summer sailing and autumn leaf-peeping - the weather forecast is the driving force behind the planning of many vacations. But when it comes to predicting the weather, WBAL meteorologist Tony Pann takes it all in stride. Pann grew up in the blustery, changeable climate of Chicago, and has since delivered the weather report for television stations in New York and Washington, as well as Baltimore. "I've seen it all," he says good-naturedly.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
Joe Bollinger writes from Glen Burnie: "What is the record for the earliest and the latest date for the first freeze at BWI?" I asked National Weather Service meteorologist Howard Silverman to query Sterling's computers. He said the earliest date the BWI thermometer touched 32 or below was Oct. 4, 1974. The latest (since 1950) was Nov. 17, 1970. Baltimore's latest first freeze was Dec. 11, 1939.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 19, 1997
Maryland will get a reminder today that winter is still with us for one more day.A cold front bringing frigid Canadian air into the mid-Atlantic region also was to bring snowfall after midnight, with about an inch accumulating on grassy areas in Central Maryland by morning."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
The longer snowflakes were kept at bay, the faster the wisecracks started coming in on Twitter and Facebook. "I remember when I was a kid in the 70's and they predicted storms accurately 7 days in advance," Havre de Grace resident Jason Falkenstine tweeted. "It would be nice to have an apology from meteorologist for being totally wrong," Baltimore resident Jason Sellers wrote. Meteorologists offered a mea culpa for predictions of Baltimore's biggest snowfall in two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
WJZ meteorologist Bernadette Woods is leaving the CBS-owned station to join a non-profit firm in New Jersey focused on climate change, she said Wednesday night. Woods, who has been with WJZ for seven years, said she will remain at the station helping with the transition for the next month. After that, she, her husband and their two children will be moving to Princeton, N.J., where she will join Climate Central as staff meteorologist. "I'm very excited about the opportunity in Princeton," she said.
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