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By Asahi News Service | May 18, 1993
OKAZAKI, Japan -- A meteorite that crashed through the roof of a home in Mihonoseki in December probably was a piece of the same space object as a falling star that landed in Japan more than a thousand years ago, researchers say.The earlier meteorite descended on Nogata City in western Japan in 861. The second hit Shimane Prefecture, 185 miles away and 1,132 years later.Masako Shima and Keisuke Nagao of the National Science Museum at Okayama University told a conference in Okazaki City that chemical analysis suggested the Mihonoseki meteorite was 61 million years old, compared to the Nogata meteorite's estimated 60 million years.
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NEWS
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
WEATHER: Cloudy, mild with highs in the mid-50s . TRAFFIC:   Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. TOP NEWS Police instructor may have injured officer outside of training drill : State investigators are exploring whether a Baltimore police instructor who shot a trainee this...
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NEWS
By John Sullivan and John Sullivan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 2000
NEW YORK - In a compromise that seeks to balance scientific inquiry with cultural tradition, the American Museum of Natural History and an Indian group from Oregon have agreed that the 15.5-ton Willamette Meteorite will remain a centerpiece of the museum's new center for earth and space. The brownish iron meteorite, the largest ever discovered in the continental United States, will continue to rest on its steel pedestal in the Cullman Hall of the Universe. But in addition to a plaque describing the scientific background of the giant rock, which scientists believe plummeted to earth 10,000 years ago from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, there will be a second display describing its history and importance as a Native American religious object.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As if some weren't already on edge with the prospect of an asteroid passing 17,000 miles from Earth, a meteorite exploded over Russian skies injuring 500 people. Scientists say the two aren't related , but there is a long list of questions many may have beyond that. Here are some answers, according to Richard Henry, academy professor in Johns Hopkins University's Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy: What is the difference between a meteor and an asteroid?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Tyeesha Dixon and Liz F. Kay and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporters | October 22, 2007
Looking for an out-of-this-world conversation starter for your den? A hefty chunk of space debris made a brief stop in Owings Mills yesterday on its way to New York to be auctioned to the highest bidder. Professional meteorite hunter Steve Arnold brought his 1,400-pound find to Direct Dimensions, an Owings Mills-based 3-D imaging company, to gather precise measurements of its mottled exterior. The meteorite - a chunk of interplanetary debris that falls to the earth's surface - is an "oriented pallasite," composed of iron and olivine, a semiprecious gemstone known as peridot.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Lisa Gahagan, University of Texas at Austin Crashing meteorites SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
THE CHESAPEAKE region may seem like an eternal place, an endless dance of light and water, mists and grasses, swamps and forests.But as scientists learn more about the forces that shape the Earth, it's becoming clear just how accidental and transient the estuary and the land that embraces it really are.It's long been understood, of course, that this corner of the middle Atlantic has been sculpted by the rise of the Appalachians to the west, meltwater from...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1996
The Martians of summer are facing a hard winter. Their very survival is in question.New research has cast a cold shadow over the sensational claims made in August that a meteorite that fell on Antarctica carried chemical and possibly fossil evidence of primitive life on early Mars -- microbial Martians.The possibility revived speculation about life on other worlds, an idea ever latent in science and the human imagination, and seemed to provide additional impetus for projects to explore the neighboring planet, including two American spacecraft now on their way.But independent tests conducted since the meteorite announcement have shown that the supposed evidence for Martian life can be explained in nonbiological terms, scientists said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | June 27, 2008
Scientists drilling into the site where a giant meteorite smashed into the lower Chesapeake Bay millions of years ago have found one more surprise amid the microscopic life and pockets of prehistoric ocean. The water is saltier than expected - and no one is sure why. "It's not a reservoir. It's water in pores and in cracks and shattered rocks," said Ward Sanford, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientists have been examining the bay impact crater since its discovery in 1993.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1996
When NASA scientists announced this summer that they had found possible signs of primitive life in a Martian meteorite, people again faced a question that has haunted mankind since the dawn of consciousness: What's in it for me?Soon enough a response came from a meteorite dealer and a New York auction house: money. But that was only part of the solution.Today we stand at the threshold of a great discovery. Meteorite collectors await word from Guernsey's auction house in Manhattan, hopeful of unlocking a mystery that for millenniums has sparked man's mercantile imagination: How much?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
A federal geologist says he has found evidence that the southern Chesapeake region was devastated 40 million years ago by a giant sea wave, hundreds of feet high, that crashed ashore after a meteorite impact somewhere in the Atlantic.C. Wylie Poag, a United States Geological Survey geologist from Woods Hole, Mass., said the titanic wave "gouged out a 200-foot-deep Connecticut-sized area in the coastal region and filled it in with a spectacular assortment of large boulders and shock-altered minerals."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Description: A meteorite that rained fragments on a frozen lake in Canada in January 2000 is revealing new insights on protein molecules thought to help explain the origins of life. The proteins can have two types of orientations — right- or left-handed, they are called — and life is not thought to be able to function without a mix of both. Scientists explored the presence of left-handed amino acids inside the meteorite fragments. Researchers: Daniel Glavin of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt was the lead author of the research, published last month, along with Jason Dworkin, Aaron Burton and Jamie Elsila of the Goddard center and Christopher Herd of the University of Alberta in Canada.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 23, 2010
Meteorite hunters are descending on Washington's Virginia suburbs this week, drawn by news of a space rock that lit up the night sky on Monday and drilled through the roof of a Lorton doctors' office. Steve Arnold, co-star of the Science Channel's TV series "Meteorite Men," grabbed an early-morning flight from Arkansas to Baltimore on Thursday to launch a search for fragments of the meteor. He was joined by Michael R. Hankey, an amateur astronomer from Freeland who was bitten by the meteorite-hunting bug last July after he snapped a photo of a fireball that fell over the Maryland-Pennsylvania state line.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 23, 2010
Meteorite hunters are descending on Washington's Virginia suburbs this week, drawn by news of a space rock that lit up the night sky on Monday and drilled through the roof of a Lorton doctors' office. Steve Arnold, co-star of the Science Channel's TV series "Meteorite Men," grabbed an early-morning flight from Arkansas to Baltimore on Thursday to launch a search for fragments of the meteor. He was joined by Michael R. Hankey, an amateur astronomer from Freeland who was bitten by the meteorite-hunting bug last July after he snapped a photo of a fireball that fell over the Maryland-Pennsylvania state line.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
With chunks of meteorites fetching thousands of dollars on the commercial market, news of the spectacular meteor that soared over parts of Maryland and Pennsylvania early Monday has touched off a cosmic treasure hunt. Professional meteorite hunters and collectors are scrambling to track down, grab (or buy if they must) any pieces of the Mason-Dixon meteor that might have survived the fall to Earth. "This is the Super Bowl," Steve "Meteorite Man" Arnold said Wednesday night after flying in from Arkansas to join the hunt.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | June 27, 2008
Scientists drilling into the site where a giant meteorite smashed into the lower Chesapeake Bay millions of years ago have found one more surprise amid the microscopic life and pockets of prehistoric ocean. The water is saltier than expected - and no one is sure why. "It's not a reservoir. It's water in pores and in cracks and shattered rocks," said Ward Sanford, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientists have been examining the bay impact crater since its discovery in 1993.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
HAVILAND, Kan. -- Steve Arnold is driving the yellow Hummer in circles around a Kiowa County wheat field, towing an 18-foot-wide metal detector. For an hour, nothing but silence. Finally, the detector whines, and Arnold slams the brakes. "That is so good," he says. Arnold jumps out, pinpoints the location with a smaller detector and starts digging. The renowned meteorite hunter is hoping for a big score. He has had three false hits today, unearthing a bit of barbed wire, a fragment of a plow, a squashed Dr Pepper can. "What's the definition of insanity?"
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Dale Pearce took a rock to work Tuesday and told his co-workers it fell out of the sky Saturday night, and he found it in the woods behind his Pasadena home. Sure, Dale. They didn't believe him at first. But Pearce may get the last laugh. The plum-sized rock that he says blazed out of the sky and smacked into the ground behind the Pasadena Crossroads Shopping Center has been identified by a NASA scientist as a genuine stony meteorite. Pearce and his rock were due at the Smithsonian Institution this morning, where experts will cut a slice from it to confirm and classify the discovery.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2002
METEOR CRATER, Ariz. -- About 50,000 years ago, a fireball streaked across the sky at 11 miles per second and crashed into the desert here, triggering a blast 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb that devastated Hiroshima. The meteorite was 150 feet wide and weighed 300,000 tons. In less than 10 seconds, it sent 175 million tons of material flying miles in all directions. The blast killed all the animal life -- mastodons, mammoths, giant ground sloths and bison -- within several miles.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Tyeesha Dixon and Liz F. Kay and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporters | October 22, 2007
Looking for an out-of-this-world conversation starter for your den? A hefty chunk of space debris made a brief stop in Owings Mills yesterday on its way to New York to be auctioned to the highest bidder. Professional meteorite hunter Steve Arnold brought his 1,400-pound find to Direct Dimensions, an Owings Mills-based 3-D imaging company, to gather precise measurements of its mottled exterior. The meteorite - a chunk of interplanetary debris that falls to the earth's surface - is an "oriented pallasite," composed of iron and olivine, a semiprecious gemstone known as peridot.
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