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By Scott Dance | May 2, 2012
Clouds blocked our view of the recent Lyrid meteor shower, but there is another chance to see “shooting stars” this weekend. The Eta Aquarids are expected to peak in the early mornings of Saturday and Sunday. The meteors come from a cloud of debris left behind by Halley's Comet, according to NASA. While the famous comet only comes by once every 76 years, twice a year Earth passes through its debris, for the Aquarids in May and the Orionids in October. The meteor shower is best viewed from the southern hemisphere, according to NASA, but provides a show up north here, too. Watch for them in the southwest sky before dawn.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A predicted "storm" of meteors overnight turned out to be mostly a bust, though some in the Midwest U.S. got a better glimpse of the shower than in the mid-Atlantic. The Earth was expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. Astronomers predicted anywhere from 100 to 400 "shooting stars" per hour, with a peak from 2-4 a.m. Saturday. Instead, the shower peaked at only around 5-10 meteors per hour, astronomers said.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak over the next couple of nights, bringing the best chance of the year to see "shooting stars". The best night is expected to be Friday night into early Saturday morning, with the most meteors being visible after midnight. But the Geminids are one meteor shower that can also be seen before midnight because Gemini, the constellation that they appear to emanate from, is in the night sky relatively early, according to the American Meteor Society.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Some clouds could partially block the view of a new meteor shower from Maryland tonight, but there is also a way you can hear the meteors' presence on a regular FM radio. To see the meteor shower, it's best to go somewhere far from city lights and with a wide open view of the sky. Partly cloudy skies are forecast overnight in the Baltimore area, which likely shouldn't be enough to obscure the heavens completely. Meteors, dubbed the Camelopardalids for the constellation they appear to emanate from, may start appearing before midnight, with a peak in the wee hours of Saturday morning before daybreak, about 2-4 a.m. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
The Draconid meteor shower peaks Monday and Tuesday evenings, though it isn't typically one of the most dramatic shows of the year. One advantage to it, though, is that you don't have to stay up all night to catch a glimpse. The meteors are best seen in the evening not long after nightfall , because that's when the constellation Draco, from which the meteors appear to emanate, is high in the sky, according to EarthSky.org. Lingering clouds could block the view for some Monday night, but Tuesday night is forecast to be clear and cool.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Watch the Eta Aquarid meteor shower in the wee hours of Saturday and Sunday mornings. The shower can produce as many as 20-40 meteors per hour at its peak, which falls around May 4-5. SpaceWeather.com suggests to expect 30+ meteors per hour, given the light of the waning moon. Like those in other annual showers, the Eta Aquarids get their name from the point from which they appear to radiate. In this case, it's the star Eta Aquarii, part of the constellation Aquarius. According to EarthSky.org, the meteors appear to emanate from a part of the constellation known as the Water Jar. Check out EarthSky's charts of how to spot the constellations here . The best time to look for the meteors is in the darkest hours of the morning, around 2-4 a.m. Best to look from a spot with a wide view of the sky and away from bright city lights.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
If skies clear of clouds and snow before dawn early Friday, there's a chance the Quadrantid meteor shower could be visible over Maryland. The shower reaches its peak for only a matter of hours, and it could arrive during the afternoon here. "But the predictions aren't always accurate," writes Bruce McClure of EarthSky.org . "This is nature, after all. " If the peak does occur during night hours here, as many as 50-100 meteors could be visible. But even if it doesn't, you might be able to spot a meteor or two in the hours before dawn Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Some clouds could partially block the view of a new meteor shower from Maryland tonight, but there is also a way you can hear the meteors' presence on a regular FM radio. To see the meteor shower, it's best to go somewhere far from city lights and with a wide open view of the sky. Partly cloudy skies are forecast overnight in the Baltimore area, which likely shouldn't be enough to obscure the heavens completely. Meteors, dubbed the Camelopardalids for the constellation they appear to emanate from, may start appearing before midnight, with a peak in the wee hours of Saturday morning before daybreak, about 2-4 a.m. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Unique celestial events in 2014 include two full lunar eclipses visible from Maryland and a partial solar eclipse that will begin just before sunset one October afternoon. A new meteor shower could be a bonus. Here's what stargazers have to look forward to next year: January Jupiter is always one of the most distinctive objects in the night sky, and it will be at its brightest early in the new year, on Jan. 5. That is when the planet is at “opposition,” when the Earth is directly between it and the sun. The Quadrantid meteors, meanwhile, also peak early in the year, on the night of Jan. 2 and into Jan. 3 for a matter of hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Mark your calendars for a new meteor shower - possibly a meteor "storm" - this week. While most showers are annual occurrences and easy to forecast, this one is a first. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. The shower could mean 100 "shooting stars" per hour, or more. Some scientists have suggested rates of up to 400 meteors per hour. How many end up being visible is uncertain because astronomers aren't sure how much and what kind of debris is trailing the comet.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Mark your calendars for a new meteor shower - possibly a meteor "storm" - this week. While most showers are annual occurrences and easy to forecast, this one is a first. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. The shower could mean 100 "shooting stars" per hour, or more. Some scientists have suggested rates of up to 400 meteors per hour. How many end up being visible is uncertain because astronomers aren't sure how much and what kind of debris is trailing the comet.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
If skies clear of clouds and snow before dawn early Friday, there's a chance the Quadrantid meteor shower could be visible over Maryland. The shower reaches its peak for only a matter of hours, and it could arrive during the afternoon here. "But the predictions aren't always accurate," writes Bruce McClure of EarthSky.org . "This is nature, after all. " If the peak does occur during night hours here, as many as 50-100 meteors could be visible. But even if it doesn't, you might be able to spot a meteor or two in the hours before dawn Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Unique celestial events in 2014 include two full lunar eclipses visible from Maryland and a partial solar eclipse that will begin just before sunset one October afternoon. A new meteor shower could be a bonus. Here's what stargazers have to look forward to next year: January Jupiter is always one of the most distinctive objects in the night sky, and it will be at its brightest early in the new year, on Jan. 5. That is when the planet is at “opposition,” when the Earth is directly between it and the sun. The Quadrantid meteors, meanwhile, also peak early in the year, on the night of Jan. 2 and into Jan. 3 for a matter of hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak over the next couple of nights, bringing the best chance of the year to see "shooting stars". The best night is expected to be Friday night into early Saturday morning, with the most meteors being visible after midnight. But the Geminids are one meteor shower that can also be seen before midnight because Gemini, the constellation that they appear to emanate from, is in the night sky relatively early, according to the American Meteor Society.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The Full Beaver Moon comes Saturday, brightening the sky and unfortunately making the Leonid meteor shower's peak and Comet ISON more difficult to see. The moon will be full at 10:16 a.m. Sunday, which actually means Saturday night's moon will appear the closest to full.  The moon gets its name from the fact that November was the time of year fur trappers set their snares, before swamps froze, according to the Farmer's Almanac . November's full...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
The Draconid meteor shower peaks Monday and Tuesday evenings, though it isn't typically one of the most dramatic shows of the year. One advantage to it, though, is that you don't have to stay up all night to catch a glimpse. The meteors are best seen in the evening not long after nightfall , because that's when the constellation Draco, from which the meteors appear to emanate, is high in the sky, according to EarthSky.org. Lingering clouds could block the view for some Monday night, but Tuesday night is forecast to be clear and cool.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
The annual Lyrid meteor shower peaks next week, but a few of the "shooting stars" may be visible as early as Tuesday night, before a nearly full moon outshines the show. The meteors are expected from about April 16 to April 25, with a peak around April 22. But given that the full moon arrives April 25, some of the meteors may be too faint to see during the peak. The show isn't the most dramatic of the year to begin with. The Lyrids are known to show up at a rate of 10-20 per hour at the peak, though that's on a moonless night, according to EarthSky.org . Meteor showers occur when Earth passes through the paths of rubble left behind by comets.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
Sunday, Aug. 11 Festival St. Alphonsus Rodriguez Catholic Church celebrates summer with its 98th annual Summer Festival from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 10800 Old Court Road in Woodstock. The festival includes games, a flea market and children's activities. The highlight is a fried chicken and ham family-style dinner. Carryout is available. Dinner tickets are $13, $7 for children 11 and younger. Information: 410-461-5267. Monday, Aug. 12 Perseids Meteor Shower and star gazing The Howard County Conservancy presents Alex Storrs, of Towson University offering a program about meteor showers.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Watch the Eta Aquarid meteor shower in the wee hours of Saturday and Sunday mornings. The shower can produce as many as 20-40 meteors per hour at its peak, which falls around May 4-5. SpaceWeather.com suggests to expect 30+ meteors per hour, given the light of the waning moon. Like those in other annual showers, the Eta Aquarids get their name from the point from which they appear to radiate. In this case, it's the star Eta Aquarii, part of the constellation Aquarius. According to EarthSky.org, the meteors appear to emanate from a part of the constellation known as the Water Jar. Check out EarthSky's charts of how to spot the constellations here . The best time to look for the meteors is in the darkest hours of the morning, around 2-4 a.m. Best to look from a spot with a wide view of the sky and away from bright city lights.
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