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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
The Quadrantid meteors, less well known than other meteor showers but a decent show for the Northern Hemisphere, reached their narrow peak early Thursday morning. There is a chance more could be seen before dawn Friday. The shower actually peaked around 8 a.m. Eastern Standard Time and only lasts for a few hours, according to NASA. The shower is named for the former constellation from which it appears to radiate,  Quadrans Muralis. The constellation was not included in an  International Astronomical Union official list of constellations in 1922, as EarthSky.org explains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Metro Meteor, whose abstract paintings rapidly are becoming an art world sensation, might be just a horse. And the 11-year-old bay, like all equines, has a hard time distinguishing reds from greens or browns. Yet Metro's original watercolors have become the runaway favorite at a regional art gallery. He has racked up a combined $130,000 in sales for his paintings and, through a separate licensing agreement, a line of home-decorating products. "Metro is by far our best-selling artist," said Peggy Rock, the director of Gallery 30 in Gettysburg, Pa. There, the horse, who is stabled here in Frederick County, has sold 80 large paintings and 300 miniature works at prices ranging from $80 to $850.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 19, 2012
Rain clouds will get in the way during the peak, but this weekend offers an opportunity to watch the Lyrid meteor shower . The meteors could appear streaking anywhere across the sky, but they get their name from the appearance that they radiate from the constellation Lyra in the northeast sky. Watch after midnight and up until just before dawn for up to 20 meteors per hour . Saturday and Sunday are the shower's peak, but the meteors...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A predicted "storm" of meteors overnight turned out to be mostly a bust, though some in the Midwest U.S. got a better glimpse of the shower than in the mid-Atlantic. The Earth was expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. Astronomers predicted anywhere from 100 to 400 "shooting stars" per hour, with a peak from 2-4 a.m. Saturday. Instead, the shower peaked at only around 5-10 meteors per hour, astronomers said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2010
Early-morning commuters in Maryland and as far away as Pittsburgh and Massachusetts were startled Monday by what was likely a spectacular meteor that crossed the sky in the pre-dawn darkness. Dawn Teagle Dobbs spotted it as she drove south on Interstate 270 near Gaithersburg at 4:47 a.m. "At first I thought it was a shooting star, but it was huge and bright green with a tail," she wrote in a post to The Baltimore Sun's Weather Blog. Ricky Diggler was motoring south on Route 100. "I saw a very large, greenish-yellow-colored object burning (with fiery tail)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
If skies clear of clouds and snow before dawn early Friday, there's a chance the Quadrantid meteor shower could be visible over Maryland. The shower reaches its peak for only a matter of hours, and it could arrive during the afternoon here. "But the predictions aren't always accurate," writes Bruce McClure of EarthSky.org . "This is nature, after all. " If the peak does occur during night hours here, as many as 50-100 meteors could be visible. But even if it doesn't, you might be able to spot a meteor or two in the hours before dawn Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Mark your calendars for a new meteor shower - possibly a meteor "storm" - this week. While most showers are annual occurrences and easy to forecast, this one is a first. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. The shower could mean 100 "shooting stars" per hour, or more. Some scientists have suggested rates of up to 400 meteors per hour. How many end up being visible is uncertain because astronomers aren't sure how much and what kind of debris is trailing the comet.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
Scores of people in Maryland and Pennsylvania who lingered outdoors into the early morning hours Monday were startled by the brilliant flash of a meteor that soared over the Mid-Atlantic states. Many more were rattled in their beds by the sonic boom that followed the flash. Sam Luther witnessed both events from a camp on the Susquehanna River near Delta, Pa. "We were sitting by the campfire on the river talking when the entire sky lit up for 3-5 seconds," he said in a post to TheBaltimore Sun's Weather Blog.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 2, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Chris Laun, vocals and guitar; Greta Thomas, violin; Sarah Canter, cello; Brent Davis, bass; Mason Baron, drums Founded in --2006 Style --rock Influenced by --Radiohead, They Might Be Giants, ELO, XTC, REM Notable --Laun, formerly a member of the now-defunct local band Challenge Club, wrote all of the songs for the forthcoming full-length album. Some of the material was written in the past while Laun was with other bands and is now finally seeing the light of day, Laun said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
People from Maryland to Virginia who happened to glance south just after sunset on Sunday are still talking about a bright fireball that swept across the sky before blowing apart."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Some clouds could partially block the view of a new meteor shower from Maryland tonight, but there is also a way you can hear the meteors' presence on a regular FM radio. To see the meteor shower, it's best to go somewhere far from city lights and with a wide open view of the sky. Partly cloudy skies are forecast overnight in the Baltimore area, which likely shouldn't be enough to obscure the heavens completely. Meteors, dubbed the Camelopardalids for the constellation they appear to emanate from, may start appearing before midnight, with a peak in the wee hours of Saturday morning before daybreak, about 2-4 a.m. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Mark your calendars for a new meteor shower - possibly a meteor "storm" - this week. While most showers are annual occurrences and easy to forecast, this one is a first. Earth is expected to pass through a debris trail left behind a comet that was discovered in 2004 and named Comet 209P/LINEAR. The shower could mean 100 "shooting stars" per hour, or more. Some scientists have suggested rates of up to 400 meteors per hour. How many end up being visible is uncertain because astronomers aren't sure how much and what kind of debris is trailing the comet.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
If skies clear of clouds and snow before dawn early Friday, there's a chance the Quadrantid meteor shower could be visible over Maryland. The shower reaches its peak for only a matter of hours, and it could arrive during the afternoon here. "But the predictions aren't always accurate," writes Bruce McClure of EarthSky.org . "This is nature, after all. " If the peak does occur during night hours here, as many as 50-100 meteors could be visible. But even if it doesn't, you might be able to spot a meteor or two in the hours before dawn Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Unique celestial events in 2014 include two full lunar eclipses visible from Maryland and a partial solar eclipse that will begin just before sunset one October afternoon. A new meteor shower could be a bonus. Here's what stargazers have to look forward to next year: January Jupiter is always one of the most distinctive objects in the night sky, and it will be at its brightest early in the new year, on Jan. 5. That is when the planet is at “opposition,” when the Earth is directly between it and the sun. The Quadrantid meteors, meanwhile, also peak early in the year, on the night of Jan. 2 and into Jan. 3 for a matter of hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak over the next couple of nights, bringing the best chance of the year to see "shooting stars". The best night is expected to be Friday night into early Saturday morning, with the most meteors being visible after midnight. But the Geminids are one meteor shower that can also be seen before midnight because Gemini, the constellation that they appear to emanate from, is in the night sky relatively early, according to the American Meteor Society.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The Full Beaver Moon comes Saturday, brightening the sky and unfortunately making the Leonid meteor shower's peak and Comet ISON more difficult to see. The moon will be full at 10:16 a.m. Sunday, which actually means Saturday night's moon will appear the closest to full.  The moon gets its name from the fact that November was the time of year fur trappers set their snares, before swamps froze, according to the Farmer's Almanac . November's full...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
CAPE CHARLES, Va. - David Powars takes a magnifying glass from his mud-splattered pants and peers at the 10-million-year-old pebbles that just gushed through a hose to the surface of the earth here. The tiny gray stones are not particularly striking. But they are part of what covers the largest impact crater in the United States, a formation the size of Rhode Island created 35 million years ago when a massive meteor smashed into the planet. The meteor sent rocks flying as far as the Gulf of Mexico and carved out geological rifts that created the Chesapeake Bay. What remains of the meteor, which was a mile in diameter, now lies under the bay and Virginia's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 9, 2009
Seen any good meteors lately? We're nearing Aug. 11-12 peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, and meteor rates are already rising. The Perseids occur as Earth passes through the dust trail of Comet Swift-Tuttle. The glare of moonlight will fade the faintest Perseids, so try looking between 9 and 11 p.m. Tuesday while Luna is low. Watch the whole sky with the moon at your back. Clear skies!
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
The Draconid meteor shower peaks Monday and Tuesday evenings, though it isn't typically one of the most dramatic shows of the year. One advantage to it, though, is that you don't have to stay up all night to catch a glimpse. The meteors are best seen in the evening not long after nightfall , because that's when the constellation Draco, from which the meteors appear to emanate, is high in the sky, according to EarthSky.org. Lingering clouds could block the view for some Monday night, but Tuesday night is forecast to be clear and cool.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Watch the Eta Aquarid meteor shower in the wee hours of Saturday and Sunday mornings. The shower can produce as many as 20-40 meteors per hour at its peak, which falls around May 4-5. SpaceWeather.com suggests to expect 30+ meteors per hour, given the light of the waning moon. Like those in other annual showers, the Eta Aquarids get their name from the point from which they appear to radiate. In this case, it's the star Eta Aquarii, part of the constellation Aquarius. According to EarthSky.org, the meteors appear to emanate from a part of the constellation known as the Water Jar. Check out EarthSky's charts of how to spot the constellations here . The best time to look for the meteors is in the darkest hours of the morning, around 2-4 a.m. Best to look from a spot with a wide view of the sky and away from bright city lights.
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