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Metastatic Breast Cancer

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By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2008
Rhonda Rhodes of Annapolis rejoiced three weeks ago when she heard the results of her latest round of breast cancer treatment. The cancer that had returned in February and spread to her brain, lungs, kidney, skin and lymph nodes has responded to the radiation and chemotherapy. Although she still has a tumor around her kidney, it shrank, and there is no evidence of other tumors, Rhodes said. The news has not quite ended the roller-coaster ride that started when she was first diagnosed with breast cancer in November 2006.
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HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
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NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 28, 2005
NEW YORK - Offering clues to the often deadly spread of some cancers from one organ to another, scientists in Manhattan have unmasked the genes that trigger breast cancers to invade the lungs, according to an analysis that will be released today. The finding is considered a landmark because it is proof that a specific genetic signature exists for each type of cancer and the organ to which it spreads. Writing in today's issue of the journal Nature, scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say their finding helps unlock the secrets of metastasis.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Breast cancer kills when rogue tumor cells spread through the bloodstream, squeezing through microscopic gaps to inundate organs until they fail. But what if that spread could be prevented, the cells left free-floating to be crushed in capillaries or to self-destruct instead? A team of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, joined by entrepreneurs and other academics, has been exploring that question for nearly a decade. What they have found challenges the basis for most breast cancer research and treatment, which focus on preventing tumor cells from multiplying.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,Sun reporters | March 23, 2007
A diagnosis of Stage IV metastatic breast cancer sounds like a death sentence. And, for some, it can be. It is both inoperable and incurable. But cancer experts say the disease is treatable, and its victims' prognoses vary as widely as their individual cancers. Elizabeth Edwards, wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, learned Monday that her breast cancer, first diagnosed and treated in 2004, has turned up in her bones. But chemical, hormonal and biological drug therapies can be used to keep it in check, said Dr. Michael Schultz, director of the breast center at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 30, 2007
BOSTON -- What I keep remembering during the long conversation about cancer and politics, about ambition and parenting, about Elizabeth and John Edwards, is the video I watched the day before their announcement. On YouTube, the candidate was shown grooming his hair in a TV green room, while a soundtrack from West Side Story played the tune "I Feel Pretty." It was no less an attack ad for its snide humor. The message was that Mr. Edwards was not one of "us." He was a member of some android species of politician.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Breast cancer kills when rogue tumor cells spread through the bloodstream, squeezing through microscopic gaps to inundate organs until they fail. But what if that spread could be prevented, the cells left free-floating to be crushed in capillaries or to self-destruct instead? A team of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, joined by entrepreneurs and other academics, has been exploring that question for nearly a decade. What they have found challenges the basis for most breast cancer research and treatment, which focus on preventing tumor cells from multiplying.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
NEWS
March 7, 2010
Howard County General Hospital's center is looking for women who are living with metastatic breast cancer to participate in a focus group to help determine the services and resources needed by this population. Women interested in participating should call Tina Evans at 410-884-4650 or e-mail cevans@hcgh.org.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
On May 7, 2009, LORRAINE C. (nee Byczynski), (71), went to eternal rest with the Lord. She died from Metastatic Breast Cancer. She is survived by her loving husband of 50 years, Robert A. "Bob" Thompson, Sr.; cherished mother of Dr. Robert A. Thompson, Jr. and his wife Jennifer and Rosemary Frank and her husband Theodore (Ted). Devoted grandmother of Abby, Robert, III and Ryan Thompson and Kelsey, Erica and Aly Frank. Beloved sister of Maryann Patti (Joe), Edward Byczynski (Gloria), Richard Byczynski (Maxine)
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2008
Rhonda Rhodes of Annapolis rejoiced three weeks ago when she heard the results of her latest round of breast cancer treatment. The cancer that had returned in February and spread to her brain, lungs, kidney, skin and lymph nodes has responded to the radiation and chemotherapy. Although she still has a tumor around her kidney, it shrank, and there is no evidence of other tumors, Rhodes said. The news has not quite ended the roller-coaster ride that started when she was first diagnosed with breast cancer in November 2006.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 30, 2007
BOSTON -- What I keep remembering during the long conversation about cancer and politics, about ambition and parenting, about Elizabeth and John Edwards, is the video I watched the day before their announcement. On YouTube, the candidate was shown grooming his hair in a TV green room, while a soundtrack from West Side Story played the tune "I Feel Pretty." It was no less an attack ad for its snide humor. The message was that Mr. Edwards was not one of "us." He was a member of some android species of politician.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,Sun reporters | March 23, 2007
A diagnosis of Stage IV metastatic breast cancer sounds like a death sentence. And, for some, it can be. It is both inoperable and incurable. But cancer experts say the disease is treatable, and its victims' prognoses vary as widely as their individual cancers. Elizabeth Edwards, wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, learned Monday that her breast cancer, first diagnosed and treated in 2004, has turned up in her bones. But chemical, hormonal and biological drug therapies can be used to keep it in check, said Dr. Michael Schultz, director of the breast center at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 28, 2005
NEW YORK - Offering clues to the often deadly spread of some cancers from one organ to another, scientists in Manhattan have unmasked the genes that trigger breast cancers to invade the lungs, according to an analysis that will be released today. The finding is considered a landmark because it is proof that a specific genetic signature exists for each type of cancer and the organ to which it spreads. Writing in today's issue of the journal Nature, scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say their finding helps unlock the secrets of metastasis.
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