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By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 10, 1992
My favorite mixed sports metaphor came in 1984 from Lawton Chiles, now the governor of Florida, who described the ''game plan'' for the presidential debates this way: ''It's like a football game. . . . Mondale can't get the ball back with one big play. But the American people love a horse race. I would advise him not to knock Reagan out.''Well, as expected, the 1992 campaign began with the usual assortment of slam-dunks, knockout punches, end runs and hard balls. But something happened after the campaign left New Hampshire and relative civility.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Writing at the Chronicle of Higher Education 's Lingua Franca blog, Anne Curzan wonders why the succinct, gender-neutral term chair  for head of a department or committee gets scorned or disregarded.  It has, after all, been in fairly wide use in colleges, universities, and organizations over the past forty years. But resistance persists.  The Associated Press Stylebook deplores it, along with chairperson , which we can lay to the AP Stylebook 's unthinking clinging to fusty old-fogeyism, to habit rather than thought.  A couple of responses to Professor Curzan's post are instructive: not quite with the trembling of empurpled wattles one often witnesses in these operations, but old-school peeving nonetheless.  One reader, Brian Able Ragen, remarks at some length: " Some of us object to being transformed into pieces of furniture.
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NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano | March 13, 1991
WHILE THE LEADERS of the anti-Iraq coalition discuss a post-war agenda, one permanent fixture of the New World Order already has been set.It's a metaphor. The mother of all metaphors.The metaphor is "The mother of all . . . "Saddam Hussein -- remember him? -- first brought it to our attention before the Persian Gulf war when he predicted that Iraq and the coalition would clash in "the mother of all battles."This was the start of the singularly gruesome poetry of Iraqi threats made before and during the fighting.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | September 11, 2013
The two artists who have separate exhibits at Howard Community College are artists-in-residence at Baltimore Clayworks. Although their exhibited sculptural objects incorporate ceramics, as you would expect, these are mixed medium creations whose materials also include wood and metal. Of the two, Kyle Bauer literally pushes further into space and into combining various materials. His exhibit in HCC's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery, "Aberrant," prompts you to ponder his unusual combinations.
NEWS
By Tim Warren | September 18, 1994
Perhaps no other sport has been written about as much as baseball. You can struggle to come up with a good basketball novel (would Updike's "Rabbit, Run" qualify?), but there's any number of excellent baseball novels, ranging from Ring Lardner's "You Know Me Al" to Bernard Malamud's "The Natural" to Mark Harris' "Bang the Drum Slowly."Baseball has also attracted an increasing number of nonfiction writers. Some, such as Roger Kahn and Roger Angell, have helped us understand and appreciate a complex, subtle sport.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | May 10, 1994
A fellow named Dave Foreman, who was and may still be the head of the radical environmental organization Earth First!, used to call humanity a cancer of the earth.The cancer metaphor is apt, but there are other metaphors that fit the apparently uncontrolled growth of our species. For instance, the metaphor of humanity as the eyes and hands of the earth also appeals to many of us mortal members of our potentially immortal species.In a new song by The Who, part of the lyric includes the electronically synthesized voice of the increasingly disembodied mind of Stephen Hawking saying, ''For millions of years, human beings lived like the animals, and then something happened that released the power of our imaginations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | February 24, 2002
Aristotle believed metaphor was a "token of genius" because it showed that a poet had "an eye for resemblances." When T.S. Eliot tells us as he does in the opening lines of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" that "the evening is spread out against the sky / like a patient etherized upon a table," he uses metaphor, simile in particular, to transform forever our experience of the evening. Part of what makes Eliot's simile work is the plausible resemblance between the evening sky and a body lying on a table.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | July 12, 1991
As a first step toward establishing a joint software development company with Apple Computer Inc., IBM announced today it would buy Metaphor Inc., a Silicon Valley software developer.Metaphor is reported to be the focal point of the two computer makers' plan to create a joint software system that will redefine desktop personal computing in the second half of the decade. Terms of the proposed purchase by IBM were not disclosed.IBM and Apple have proposed pooling their development efforts to create an alternative to a similar new desktop standard being proposed by an industry consortium made up of Compaq Computer Corp.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
The queen, who first visited America's first permanent English settlement 50 years ago, returned last week for the commemoration of Jamestown's 400th anniversary and praised the two countries' continuing "special relationship" and the cultural changes that have occurred in both through her long reign. ?The melting-pot metaphor captures one of the great strengths of your country and is an inspiration to others around the world as we face the continuing social challenges ahead.? Queen Elizabeth II
BUSINESS
December 21, 1992
Hewlett-Packard and Metaphor join forcesHewlett-Packard Co. and Metaphor Inc., a part of IBM, announced an agreement last week to provide access from Metaphor's decision-making software to the powerful HP 9000 computer.Metaphor is a wholly owned, independently managed subsidiary of International Business Machines Corp."We are excited that Metaphor has chosen the HP 9000 as the first non-IBM platform for its product," Franz Nawratil, a Hewlett-Packard vice president, told a teleconference.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SPAVINED Human beings' long association with horses before the advent of the automobile has left numerous traces in the language, such as the dead metaphor free rein  (commonly rendered as free reign  by people ignorant of harness) for "autonomy. " Last week, railing against the irritating frequency of iconic  in journalism, I made use of another, suggesting that legendary  "has gone spavined.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 20, 2011
Somewhere it must be written on a stone tablet — or on the back of a betting slip — that heading into the third weekend in May, we must again examine who we are and why the Preakness Stakes is such an important part of that. The answer is not just at Old Hilltop, but in every place around Baltimore where one generation clings to tradition while the next tries to conform it to the realities of a new age. That's why on the same (hopefully) sunny Saturday afternoon, the swells in the box seats will sip their Black-eyed Susans while the sots on the infield hail something called Kegasus and wonder why they can't bet on him. The Preakness is Baltimore in so many ways that you'll have to just take my word for it. To those viewing from afar, the second jewel of the Triple Crown is — like the old town around it — the halfway point between here and there.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
In his commentary "Pro-immigrant is pro-business" (Oct. 17), Dan Rodricks is making a mockery of federal and local law enforcement efforts to curtail the flow of illegal immigrants across our nation's borders. Former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s argument "if someone breaks into my house, is that a new member of my family that night?" is valid and spot on. I may be only a middle income, registered Democrat and federal civil servant, but I recognize the fact that Governor Ehrlich is demanding that we respect the efforts of our federal and state law enforcement officials who are attempting to mitigate the dramatic flow of illegal immigrants into our nation and state!
NEWS
May 6, 2007
The queen, who first visited America's first permanent English settlement 50 years ago, returned last week for the commemoration of Jamestown's 400th anniversary and praised the two countries' continuing "special relationship" and the cultural changes that have occurred in both through her long reign. ?The melting-pot metaphor captures one of the great strengths of your country and is an inspiration to others around the world as we face the continuing social challenges ahead.? Queen Elizabeth II
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | April 8, 2007
You could stare for years at The Creation of Adam, and never notice it. But once someone points out the metaphor in Michelangelo's masterpiece, it's hard to interpret it any other way. Focus on the purple cloak swirling around the deity and his host of angels (as a medical student named F.L. Meshberger did in 1990, in an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association). Notice, especially, how the fabric gathers and tucks. Doesn't it resemble a side view of the human brain, attached to its flexible column of spinal cord?
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | January 31, 2007
The art of landscape is by definition poetic and symbolical. We respond to pictures of field and forest, mountain and sea because the varied moods of nature somehow seem to echo our innermost thoughts and feelings. Landscape as metaphor is a recurring motif in Terra Incognito/Terra Cognito, an exhibition of recent works by painter Ruth Pettus and photographer Michela Caudill at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Pettus' atmospheric ink drawings and Caudill's spare, black-and-white photographs are mounted on opposing walls, where they activate a subtle visual dialog between the two media.
NEWS
May 14, 1997
UNFORTUNATELY, The Sun's May 8 editorial ("In our own back yard") dredges up the ''yard'' metaphor to refer to the region where President Clinton is discussing a plethora of issues -- drug trafficking, trade and immigration -- of importance to the United States and Latin America.Unlike the media, the president is savvy enough to avoid speaking of Latin America as if it belonged to the United States.From the Monroe Doctrine in 1823 to the present, U.S. leaders have used geographical proximity to argue that Washington is the ''natural protector'' of Latin America.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | January 14, 1998
EVERY trade has its tools, and my favorite among the tools of my trade is the metaphor. Nothing beats a well-crafted metaphor for persuading the mind into seeing things its way. Whole stretches of the landscape of our lives, it seems, can be indelibly mapped by an apt metaphor. Which makes metaphorical stories the most powerful devices of humankind's moral teachers, and which brings me to Aesop, the fabulous fabulist of ancient Greece.Has anyone been more adept at imposing the template of his metaphors on our vision of our world than that storytelling slave?
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUn Columnist | December 28, 2006
As has become traditional in this space, it's time to look over the columns of 2006 and see who we offended in the hope of making things right -- or at least getting another column without a lot of heavy lifting. Topping the list of the hugely aggrieved in 2006: home painting contractors. After a column about the nightmare my wife and I had trying to get our living room and dining room painted and the joy of dealing with these people -- estimates that are all over the map, contractors who don't even bother to call you back, contractors who bad-mouth the work of other contractors -- I heard from several ticked-off contractors.
NEWS
By James Marcus and James Marcus,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 2006
The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History Jonathan Franzen Farrar, Straus & Giroux / 196 pages / $22 In one chapter of his new memoir, Jonathan Franzen recalls his youthful immersion in the German language, which culminated in a grudging conquest of The Magic Mountain. It was, appropriately, an uphill battle. Thomas Mann's masterwork, with its jackhammer ironies and its Teutonic nerd of a protagonist, almost drove the Swarthmore senior out of his mind. Yet he recognized "at the heart of the book ... a question of genuine personal interest both to Mann and to me: How does it happen that a young person so quickly strays so far from the values and expectations of his middle-class upbringing?"
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