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By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Contributing Writer | July 20, 1992
In keeping with the political overtones of the past week, the 50,000 thunder-seekers entering RFK on Friday evening were as effectively split as the two-party system. The only conjecture the Metallica and Guns N' Roses camps could agree upon was that opening act Faith No More would live up to the latter part of their moniker and offer "no more" than their allotted time. Thankfully, they complied.There is something positively menacing in the way Metallica's James Hatfield approaches his audience.
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By From Sun staff and news services | March 10, 2009
On the Web: * CollegeHumor.com, a popular comedy Web site devoted to the (cough) collegiate mind, has done it again. A series of viral videos on the site features a prank war between site front page editor Streeter Seidell and senior writer Amir Blumenfeld. In the last installment (in 2007), prankster Amir gave Streeter Yankee tickets for him and his girlfriend. Amir arranged it so the JumboTron had Streeter unknowingly proposing to his girlfriend (which subsequently added to the end of their relationship)
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 2, 1992
LARGO -- Few rock bands expect as much as Metallica demands of its audience.Other acts go out of their way to make it easy on their fans -- playing only the most familiar material, for example, or carefully teaching the words before asking for a sing-along.Not Metallica, though. In addition to feeling free to dredge up almost anything in its back catalog, this heaviest of heavy metal quartets takes it for granted that its crowd will know the words to everything.Arrogant? Maybe. Presumptuous?
SPORTS
June 30, 2008
Tennis Wimbledon 7 a.m. [ESPN2] What's the deal here? Venus and Serena Williams are playing their matches back-to-back on Court 2? To quote Patrick Swayze in Dirty Dancing, "Nobody puts Baby in the corner." (Coverage also at 10 a.m. on channels 11 and 4 and back on ESPN2 at 1 p.m.) Swimming U.S. Olympic trials 8 p.m. [USA] Keep in mind that those high-tech swimsuits the competitors have on cost more than the suit you're wearing to work. Music 100 Greatest Songs of the '90s 8 p.m. [VH1]
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 27, 1992
For years, Metallica was the best-kept secret in heavy metal. Although the band's albums regularly went platinum -- in fact, every Metallica release since 1986's "Master of Puppets" has been a million-seller -- the quartet was barely known outside the metal underground. Radio refused to play the band's music, while the rock press gave the group only the most cursory coverage.And when Metallica was among the nominees for the first heavy metal Grammy, in 1989, it lost out -- to Jethro Tull, of all bands!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 16, 1991
METALLICAMetallica (Elektra 61113)If all thrash seems an indistinguishable blur of double-time drums and over-amplified guitar, then you owe it to yourself to hear Metallica's new album, "Metallica." Not only are the songs slower and shorter than on the band's four previous offerings, but they cover a wider stylistic range, from the elegiac orchestration of "The Unforgiven" to the quote from Leonard Bernstein's "America" that ironically opens "Don't Tread on Me." Yet as much as that makes this album more approachable to non-fans, the band's long-term following ought to be even more enamored of its expanded range and sharpened songwriting.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 6, 2004
So you're not a metal head. And if you've heard of any metal band, then it's probably Metallica - the premier group of the genre, the only head-bangers to garner immense commercial success (90 million albums sold worldwide) and critical respect for expanding thrash with complex, innovative musicianship. Over the years, these guys lived as hard as they rocked, earning the name "Alcoholica" along the way. And you've seen enough VH1: Behind the Music specials to know that, when the smoke clears, what's left is never pretty: overblown egos, various addictions, poorly received albums, creative emptiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 31, 1993
LIVE: BINGE & PURGEMetallica (Elektra 61594)What's the difference between a fan and a fanatic? Easy. A fan would be satisfied with a concert album that simply culled the highlights of a band's live show; a fanatic will insist on hearing every note. So what does it say about Metallica fans that "Live: Binge & Purge" offers not one but three complete concerts? Slogging through its three hours of audio plus five and a half hours of video is literally a full day's work, and by the third version of "Creeping Death" or "Seek & Destroy," casual listeners will be climbing the walls.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 2, 1992
LARGO -- Few rock bands expect as much as Metallica demands of its audience.Other acts go out of their way to make it easy on their fans -- playing only the most familiar material, for example, or carefully teaching the words before asking for a sing-along.Not Metallica, though. In addition to feeling free to dredge up almost anything in its back catalog, this heaviest of heavy metal quartets takes it for granted that its crowd will know the words to everything.Arrogant? Maybe. Presumptuous?
FEATURES
May 3, 2003
Hard time calls for hard rock - at least that's the view of Metallica, who performed a free hour-long concert at California's San Quentin State Prison. The heavy-metal band agreed to perform Thursday for about 800 inmates after spending 18 hours at the prison Wednesday filming the video for the title track to its new album, St. Anger. A spokesman for Metallica's record company, Elektra Records, said prisoners and guards appeared as extras in the video, which was shot inside a cell block and in the outside yard during a lunch break.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils | November 23, 2006
Godsmack Godsmack's hard-rocking IV Tour comes to Baltimore on Wednesday at the 1st Mariner Arena, led by front man Sully Erna (pictured). The band got its start in Boston when its breakout hit "Keep Away" earned heavy radio rotation just as Godsmack began earning a reputation as a great live band - a reputation it continues to earn today, having toured with Metallica while giving intimate acoustic performances on the side. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. at 201 W. Baltimore St. Tickets are $39.50 and $49.50, available by calling 410-547-SEAT or by visiting ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | October 14, 2004
"Hopeville" / 1st Mariner and Constitution Hall The "Hopeville" tour, featuring Kirk Franklin, Yolanda Adams and Donnie McClurkin, makes two area stops this week. The concert first heads to 1st Mariner Arena on Sunday night at 7 and then to Constitution Hall in Washington on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. 1st Mariner is at 201 W. Baltimore St., and Constitution Hall is at 18th and D streets N.W. in D.C. Tickets are $50 for D.C. and $29.50-$39.50 for the Baltimore show and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 6, 2004
So you're not a metal head. And if you've heard of any metal band, then it's probably Metallica - the premier group of the genre, the only head-bangers to garner immense commercial success (90 million albums sold worldwide) and critical respect for expanding thrash with complex, innovative musicianship. Over the years, these guys lived as hard as they rocked, earning the name "Alcoholica" along the way. And you've seen enough VH1: Behind the Music specials to know that, when the smoke clears, what's left is never pretty: overblown egos, various addictions, poorly received albums, creative emptiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 6, 2004
When Metallica decided to record its first album of new material in five years ("St. Anger"), the band invited filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky to document the process. From 2001-2003, they were given unlimited access, capturing group therapy sessions and angry outbursts on film, resulting in an honest and intimate portrait of the band and its members. Sinofsky and Berlinger also directed 1992's critically acclaimed "Brother's Keeper" and 1996's "Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hills," which featured Metallica on its soundtrack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Schubert and Linda Schubert,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
It was just supposed to be a short little promotional film to keep Metallica fans happy while the band members took time to record their next album. But then longtime bassist Jason Newsted quit, the recording sessions fell flat, a therapist was brought in and frontman James Hetfield walked out, not to return for almost a year while in rehab. All the while, the cameras kept rolling. The resulting film, Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, has been racking up critical acclaim at festivals and during its limited release.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Schubert and Linda Schubert,Sun Staff | May 6, 2004
It used to be that the term "film festival" conjured visions of quirky little art films shot on a shoestring budget -- films that had little or no chance of ever being screened for a mainstream audience. They were thought-provoking pieces that contained little or no action and usually delved deep into the mysteries of human nature and emotion. Films about heavy metal bands need not apply -- until now. This weekend's Maryland Film Festival will feature the Baltimore debut of Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, a documentary that follows the most successful heavy metal band in history into the studio as the members record their most recent album, St. Anger.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 23, 1998
Kris Dotson is less than an hour away from what might be the greatest moment in his life, and he's nervous.Well, he thinks it's nerves, anyway. Truth be told, the 26-year-old from Eugene, Ore., is too excited to know what, exactly, he's feeling. "I'm on this high state of mind, and everything's happening so fast," he said. "The fear that I have -- well, I don't know if it's fear, but the excitement of actually being face to face with these guys "The guys in question are James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Kirk Hammett and Jason Newsted, a group known collectively as Metallica.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Schubert and Linda Schubert,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
It was just supposed to be a short little promotional film to keep Metallica fans happy while the band members took time to record their next album. But then longtime bassist Jason Newsted quit, the recording sessions fell flat, a therapist was brought in and frontman James Hetfield walked out, not to return for almost a year while in rehab. All the while, the cameras kept rolling. The resulting film, Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, has been racking up critical acclaim at festivals and during its limited release.
FEATURES
By Gemma Tarlach and Gemma Tarlach,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 10, 2003
Metallica. Would a band by any other name rock as hard? Would Snoop Dogg still be the hizzle fo' shizzle if he went by his given name, Calvin Broadus? Consider the White Stripes. The name alone suggests something minimal, something hip, like detailing on a Vespa - the perfect match for a guitar and drums duo too cool for the room. Or Slayer. There's an act that will never be mistaken for a boy band. Whether you're starting up a music act with stars in your eyes or trying to make sense of the names on the extra-early holiday wish list of CDs passed along by your favorite music fan, we've put together a highly unscientific guide to what's in a name, anyway, when it comes to pop music.
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