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NEWS
By Elizabeth Burgard | October 27, 1994
(in the post-modern era)Black Vultures ride the currentin the bright shadowless noonwith sight born to find the dead.Landing on the hot concrete road,hunched scruffy backs to me,they tear crushed snake.My car drifts to a stop,one turns, lumbers forward, lifts,wings span the windshield,its head bears down.Out of the wrinkled bald skull,contorted folds on what is not a face,death-finding eyes fix on mine,pressing my body back against the seat.My heart flails in a pitfall,bloody wings drag the glass,threaten not to rise.
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NEWS
December 14, 1992
Smoldering ashes caused $100,000 fireThe two-alarm fire that damaged a Carrolltowne home Thursday night was caused when smoldering ashes placed in a cardboard box caught fire in the garage, said Deputy State Fire Marshal Bob Thomas.The fire caused about $100,000 damage to the home, Mr. Thomas said Friday.About 60 Carroll and Howard County firefighters responded to the blaze at about 6:15 p.m. Thursday. Strong winds and heavy rains hampered firefighters' efforts to put out the blaze, Thomas said.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | January 30, 2000
THE BIG SNOW we just had has some people eyeing their roofs with concern: Will the roof hold up under the weight of double-digit depths? The answer can depend on the age of your house. Most newer roofs are engineered to carry the weight of the roof itself plus a snow load and a wind load. But back before building codes were in force, people sometimes used undersized lumber -- either to save money or because they didn't know any better. In that situation the roof can sag over time. But it is not likely that it will actually collapse under the weight of a heavy snow.
NEWS
April 19, 1999
A fire destroyed a privately owned barn next to the U.S. Naval Academy's dairy farm yesterday an Anne Arundel County Fire Department spokesman said.Lt. Robert Rose said the contents of the barn also were destroyed, The loss was estimated at $150,000."It was a total loss," he aid.Rose said charges were pending against a youth suspected of a setting the fire.The youth entered the barn, on Claffy Avenue in Gambrills, about 3 p.m. and used a cigarette lighter to set fire to hay, quickly engulfing the building, Rose said.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Rene Laya, Dale Lupton and Scott Jones sat on scaffolding in the steamy sunshine dozens of feet above the ground, carefully removing bricks from a roof cornice built a century and a half ago for a place called Blandair. It is careful, tedious, sweaty work, peeling back the layers of history to prepare for a $1.8 million restoration of the late Elizabeth Smith's once jealously guarded home. The men work for the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Training Center, based in Frederick, and their efforts have begun the transformation of a secluded, rundown farm into a 300-acre park intended to be a new jewel in Columbia.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | December 6, 1994
Sixteen people lost their homes when a four-alarm blaze destroyed a large converted barn on Locust Street in Manchester yesterday.At least 14 firefighters were injured, some by cyanide poisoning, at the fire and taken to area hospitals for treatment. Fire officials were attempting to locate the source of the cyanide.Two firefighters were flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where one was in critical condition. The nature of their injuries was not immediately known.John Hoffman, a volunteer for the Manchester Fire Company, suffered a possible fractured ankle and was taken to Carroll County General Hospital for treatment.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
A house in the Tannery area, crushed by a tree during a brief but intense storm Tuesday and declared unsafe by a county building inspector, has been listed as a loss from the damage, according to Ralph Green, code official for the county.County officials said the three occupants would have to find other shelter because of the extreme damage done to the house about 2 p.m. Tuesday.The two-story frame house owned by Alen Grammer, in the 1300 block of Tannery Hill Road, was struck seconds after the metal roof and some wood siding of a large barn less than a quarter-mile away on Tannery Road were ripped off.During the storm, winds in the county were clocked at 60 miles per hour.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
The Annapolis Historic District Commission last night gave the go-ahead to a new downtown restaurant provided the owner agrees to make a few more design changes.The commission said Pusser's Restaurant at 80 Compromise St. will have to reduce the number of lights above its sign from five to four, lower flag poles, and eliminate the figure of a finger and hand pointing toward the entrance.The 2-1 approval means the restaurant should be able to open on time Sept. 19.Some of the city's ardent historic preservationists had criticized the design of the restaurant, which will be located next to the Annapolis Marriott Waterfront.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
A house in the Tannery area, crushed by a tree during a brief but intense storm Tuesday and declared unsafe by a county building inspector, has been listed as a loss from the damage, according to Ralph Green, code official for the county.County officials said the three occupants would have to find other shelter because of the extreme damage done to the house about 2 p.m. Tuesday.The two-story frame house owned by Alen Grammer, in the 1300 block of Tannery Hill Road, was struck seconds after the metal roof and some wood siding of a large barn less than a quarter-mile away on Tannery Road were ripped off.During the storm, winds in the county were clocked at 60 miles per hour.
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