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Messianic Jews

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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 6, 1991
A bearded man blows a ram's horn into a sunlit Annapolis street, andthe ancient greeting "Shabbat shalom" echoes through the room.Men in prayer shawls sway and sing, sing and pray. Fringes poke from beneath their shirts. Yarmulkes cap their heads. Women clutch children's hands and repeat, "Hear oh Israel, the Lord our God is one . . ."The families look traditionally Jewish. The sanctuary on Bay Ridge Avenue could be any synagogue, anywhere.But there is one weighty difference between these Jews and the rest of the Jewish community:They believe Jesus was the Jewish messiah.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Columbia's four interfaith centers embody the planned community's vision of bringing together diverse groups, providing a place to worship in a tolerant environment. More than 5,000 congregants - including Buddhists, Muslims, Jews and Christians - attend services at the centers weekly. A congregation of Messianic Jews - who believe that Jesus is the Messiah - is building a fifth interfaith center in Columbia's last village of River Hill. And that has ignited a debate over freedom of religion in the town that was developed in 1967 as a home for people of all races and backgrounds.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Columbia's four interfaith centers embody the planned community's vision of bringing together diverse groups, providing a place to worship in a tolerant environment. More than 5,000 congregants - including Buddhists, Muslims, Jews and Christians - attend services at the centers weekly. A congregation of Messianic Jews - who believe that Jesus is the Messiah - is building a fifth interfaith center in Columbia's last village of River Hill. And that has ignited a debate over freedom of religion in the town that was developed in 1967 as a home for people of all races and backgrounds.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
In a traditional Jewish congregation, the ark that holds the scrolls of the Torah is set in a place of honor in the synagogue.But Emmanuel Messianic Congregation has its ark in the sanctuary of Covenant Baptist Church in Hickory Ridge, signifying the practice of a nontraditional type of Judaism that has other county Jewish leaders upset.The Messianic group, which follows many Jewish beliefs but also worships Yeshua (Hebrew for Jesus) as the Messiah, moved to Columbia from Baltimore County last month.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 6, 1991
Rabbi Seth Gordon of Kneseth Israel in Annapolis sums up Messianic Judaism this way: It isn't.That is, it isn't Jewish. It may be allsorts of things: An attempt to find deeper spirituality or to avoid ostracism in a predominantly Christian society, perhaps the wish to unite a troubled world by blending two major religions. But those goals don't define the movement as part of Judaism, Gordon says."It's just not Jewish. They can use the term Jewish. But anyone who knows Judaism knows where the absolute distinctions are."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Gary and Shirley Beresford were married in an Orthodox synagogue in South Africa, and consider themselves observant Jews and ardent Zionists.He wears a skullcap, and she covers her hair. They keep the Sabbath and follow Jewish dietary laws. Her two sons from a previous marriage, who had emigrated to Israel before she did in 1986 from Zimbabwe, were Israeli army paratroopers. Decades ago, some of her relatives helped found a kibbutz in Galilee.But the Beresfords also believe that Jesus of Nazareth was the Messiah, the long-awaited Redeemer of the Jews, and that conviction is about to bring their sojourn in Israel to an end.In a variant of the never-ending debate over who is a Jew, Israel's High Court holds that the Beresfords, however much they consider themselves Jews, embrace another religion and are therefore not eligible for citizenship under the 1950 Law of Return, which gives every Jew the right to immigrate here.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
In a traditional Jewish congregation, the ark that holds the scrolls of the Torah is set in a place of honor in the synagogue.But Emmanuel Messianic Congregation has its ark in the sanctuary of Covenant Baptist Church in Hickory Ridge, signifying the practice of a nontraditional type of Judaism that has other county Jewish leaders upset.The Messianic group, which follows many Jewish beliefs but also worships Yeshua (Hebrew for Jesus) as the Messiah, moved to Columbia from Baltimore County last month.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2000
When Rabbi Barry Rubin leads the Emmanuel Messianic Jewish Congregation's Columbia community Seder next week, Passover matzo will be eaten as the words of Jesus are read. At Emmanuel, the deliverance from sin brought by Jesus is woven into the Seder, the traditional Jewish Passover dinner commemorating the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage to Egypt. Passover begins Wednesday at sundown and ends April 27. Thus, the drinking of the third cup of Seder wine -- the cup of redemption -- will be used to remind worshipers that this cup also symbolizes the blood shed by Jesus when he was executed.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Columbia's four interfaith centers embody the planned community's vision of bringing together diverse groups, providing a place to worship in a tolerant environment. More than 5,000 congregants - including Buddhists, Muslims, Jews and Christians - attend services at the centers weekly. A congregation of Messianic Jews - who believe that Jesus is the Messiah - is building a fifth interfaith center in Columbia's last village of River Hill. And that has ignited a debate over freedom of religion in the town that was developed in 1967 as a home for people of all races and backgrounds.
EXPLORE
May 30, 2011
Religion in Howard County is both diverse and flourishing. Close to 300 faith communities worship here, including Protestant, Roman Catholic, Jewish, Islamic, Mormon, Christian Scientist, Seventh-day Adventist, Baha'i, Buddhist, Scientologist and Unitarian Universalist groups. Among them are at least 43 Baptist, 41 Methodist, 15 Roman Catholic, 15 Presbyterian, 12 Lutheran, 10 Episcopalian and seven Jewish congregations, as well as one for Messianic Jews. They meet in interfaith centers, churches, synagogues, schools or neighborhood facilities - more than 200 places of worship.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Gary and Shirley Beresford were married in an Orthodox synagogue in South Africa, and consider themselves observant Jews and ardent Zionists.He wears a skullcap, and she covers her hair. They keep the Sabbath and follow Jewish dietary laws. Her two sons from a previous marriage, who had emigrated to Israel before she did in 1986 from Zimbabwe, were Israeli army paratroopers. Decades ago, some of her relatives helped found a kibbutz in Galilee.But the Beresfords also believe that Jesus of Nazareth was the Messiah, the long-awaited Redeemer of the Jews, and that conviction is about to bring their sojourn in Israel to an end.In a variant of the never-ending debate over who is a Jew, Israel's High Court holds that the Beresfords, however much they consider themselves Jews, embrace another religion and are therefore not eligible for citizenship under the 1950 Law of Return, which gives every Jew the right to immigrate here.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 6, 1991
Rabbi Seth Gordon of Kneseth Israel in Annapolis sums up Messianic Judaism this way: It isn't.That is, it isn't Jewish. It may be allsorts of things: An attempt to find deeper spirituality or to avoid ostracism in a predominantly Christian society, perhaps the wish to unite a troubled world by blending two major religions. But those goals don't define the movement as part of Judaism, Gordon says."It's just not Jewish. They can use the term Jewish. But anyone who knows Judaism knows where the absolute distinctions are."
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | August 6, 1991
A bearded man blows a ram's horn into a sunlit Annapolis street, andthe ancient greeting "Shabbat shalom" echoes through the room.Men in prayer shawls sway and sing, sing and pray. Fringes poke from beneath their shirts. Yarmulkes cap their heads. Women clutch children's hands and repeat, "Hear oh Israel, the Lord our God is one . . ."The families look traditionally Jewish. The sanctuary on Bay Ridge Avenue could be any synagogue, anywhere.But there is one weighty difference between these Jews and the rest of the Jewish community:They believe Jesus was the Jewish messiah.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | June 8, 1993
A Baltimore-area radio station, which thrives on controversial talk shows, has told a Messianic Jewish-Christian congregation in Owings Mills that its Sunday morning discussion and call-in hour will be canceled at the end of a one-year contract this month.Sean Casey, program director for WCBM-AM, denied reports yesterday -- prompted by supporters of the show -- that the station was giving in to pressures by advertisers to cancel it. "We simply made a decision to move away from religious broadcasting of that nature."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2005
The way David A. Finkelstein sees it, he's only trying to share the good news with his people. Raised Jewish in Pikesville, Finkelstein says he didn't know the presence of God until he found Yeshua. Now he believes that this Jew who lived 2,000 years ago is the messiah promised by God - and that accepting him as his savior has fulfilled his Jewish self. Finkelstein, the spiritual leader of the Am Yeshua Messianic Jewish congregation in Reisterstown, is one of several local believers planning to join a missionary group targeting Baltimore-area Jews for conversion to Christianity.
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