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Messiah

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By TIM SMITH | December 20, 2007
The American Opera Theater, founded in 2002 by Peabody alumnus Timothy Nelson, has spiced up recent seasons with such novelties as a circus-themed version of Handel's Acis and Galatea, complete with a soprano singing an aria while slowly spinning upside down. So it ought to be very interesting to see what this group does in what is billed as a "fully staged production" of Handel's oratorio Messiah. Nelson promises "an ecumenical portrait of human struggle and redemption in an abstract, dramatic style that is at once ritual and theater."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Sunday's musical attractions included the 79th annual performance of Handel's "Messiah" by a choir named for the composer, plus a chamber music program presented by the Shriver Hall Concert Series. A few words on each. The choir seems to be in fine shape. It maintained a well-balanced sound and articulated with admirable clarity during a matinee at Towson Presbyterian Church, led by the ensemble's new artistic director and conductor of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, Arian Khaefi.
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FEATURES
By Robert Haskins and Robert Haskins,Contributing Writer | April 5, 1993
Handel's mighty oratorio, "Messiah," was phenomenally popular during the composer's lifetime; Handel presented it numerous times, tailoring each performance for specific soloists by revising or, in some cases, by composing entirely new music.For the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's fine performance of the complete oratorio yesterday at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, music director Tom Hall chose the version of the work used for a famous performance in London in 1750.It may seem strange to some to hear this work around Easter, but it had its premiere April 13, 1742.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | December 5, 2013
Composer George Frederick Handel's "Messiah" was first performed in Dublin in 1742, and it has been performed around the world ever since. Maintaining that tradition in Howard County, Columbia Pro Cantare performs its 27th annual "Messiah" on Sunday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. The edited version that Columbia Pro Cantare performs every December includes this famous oratorio's Christmas section and selections from Parts II and III. Running around two hours, this version ensures that audience members will hear their favorite passages.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | December 5, 2013
Composer George Frederick Handel's "Messiah" was first performed in Dublin in 1742, and it has been performed around the world ever since. Maintaining that tradition in Howard County, Columbia Pro Cantare performs its 27th annual "Messiah" on Sunday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. The edited version that Columbia Pro Cantare performs every December includes this famous oratorio's Christmas section and selections from Parts II and III. Running around two hours, this version ensures that audience members will hear their favorite passages.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 23, 2009
Caitlin Walker (Fallston) scored the only goal to lead second-ranked Salisbury (20-1) to a 1-0 victory over top-ranked Messiah (22-1) in the NCAA Division III championship game in South Hadley, Mass. The goal came 3:33 into the match off a penalty corner. Michelle Rowe (Elkton) passed the ball at the top of the circle to Tara McGovern , who found Walker on the left side of the goal, and she was able to put home the eventual game-winner. McGovern, Capital Athletic Conference Player of the Year, also assisted on the only goal in the semifinal victory over Tufts.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
There had to have been an easier way.In an Ellicott City production of Handel's "Messiah," the orchestra and soloists showed up only an hour before showtime, and the chorus straggled in much later. And many of them didn't even bring their music with them.It could have been a disastrous affair, but -- oddly -- it was all by design.At the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' 13th annual "Messiah" Sing-In on Sunday night, the element of surprise was as important as the flute and violin -- or the composition's "Hallelujah!"
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 17, 2004
In the midst of the Great Depression, an amateur choral society was founded to give Baltimore's cultural life a boost. The group is still commited to the community. On Sunday, the Handel Choir of Baltimore marks its 70th year with a new artistic director and a renewed effort to make a difference on the music scene. "The Handel Choir has a pride and tradition," says Melinda O'Neal, chosen late last season to succeed longtime director T. Herbert Dimmock III. O'Neal has been a music professor at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire and led the school's Handel Society for 25 years.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | December 5, 2002
It is well nigh impossible to recommend a definitive recording of Messiah because no definitive version of the work exists. Handel tinkered with it constantly, sprucing it up to fit the different specifications of the many performances he conducted. The autograph score of 1741 is different from the Dublin premiere copy of 1742. Handel presented different versions in London in 1743, 1745, 1749 and 1750. Then, of course, there's the Foundling Hospital incarnation of 1759. So we won't think "definitive" here, just good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Haskins | December 21, 1990
Miraculously composed in under three weeks, Handel's "Messiah" is one of Western culture's most spectacular achievements. Since its premiere nearly 250 years ago, the work has never vanished from the stage, enjoying performances of every conceivable interpretation with forces of every imaginable size. While some of these performances, surely, have served Handel's music better than others, all have affirmed the quintessentially elusive character which distinguishes all great masterworks.The "Messiah" given Wednesday by the Baltimore Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, conducted by Edward Polochick, was the most engaging heard in a long time.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 25, 2013
Pro soccer United, D.C. reach pact on new $300M stadium D.C. United executives and Washington officials have reached a preliminary $300 million deal to build a 20,000-seat stadium for the team on Buzzard Point in Southwest Washington. The agreement, team and city leaders said, could end a decade-long search by the Major League Soccer franchise for a new venue that would allow it to leave RFK Stadium, where D.C. United has played since its founding in 1996 but where its investors say the team loses money every year.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Nearly 200 voices will join together this week, as choral singers from Notre Dame Preparatory School, Bryn Mawr School, Calvert Hall College High School, Hereford High School, Loyola Blakefield and Roland Park Country School present a combined concert on Sunday, Dec. 16, at 3 p.m., in Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. The students will perform George Fredrick Handel's "Messiah," complete with orchestra and professional soloists. Conducting the performance will be Peter Lander from Hereford High School.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
Sometimes something special just happens. It happened the other night at Columbia Pro Cantare's performance of Handel's Messiah. The music, the performers just seemed perfectly aligned with each other. Frances Motyca Dawson was on top of her chorus. They all had been there before, many times, but there was nothing tired or predictable in the performance. They just got better and better as the night continued. Ronald Mutchnick's orchestral ensemble was also amazing. I actually looked for the individual musicians - who was playing the violins, the trumpet?
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 30, 2012
It wouldn't be the Christmas season without George Frideric Handel's "Messiah," and in Howard County that means a performance by Columbia Pro Cantare on Sunday, Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m. at Jim Rouse Theater at Wilde Lake. "Handel's 'Messiah' arrives every December and has a worldwide and fabulously successful run," Columbia Pro Cantare music director Frances Motyca Dawson says about this 18th-century oratorio's widespread appeal. "It has a sense of theater and of great drama. Handel came out of opera, and when he turned to writing oratorios that sense of drama never left him. There is a very special quality to the music that continues to delight the ear, mind and heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2012
The holiday season wouldn't be the holiday season without colorful music and dance events. And, just as department stores break out the Christmas decorations earlier and earlier, some performing arts organizations get into the swing before Thanksgiving. A couple of stage versions of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," for example, are already up and running, with more on the way. Handel's evergreen oratorio "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's beloved ballet "The Nutcracker" will be here in abundance before you know it, along with all sorts of seasonal concerts by any number of ensembles, starting next weekend with a holiday program by the Canadian Tenors.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
The Live Arts Maryland season-opening classical concerts last month became an elegant prelude to two beloved holiday traditions offered by Anne Arundel County's largest performing arts group. The group, consisting of the 170-voice Annapolis Chorale, the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and the Annapolis Youth Chorus, along with several stellar soloists, will offer two performances of the annual Celebration of Christmas concert on Dec. 8 and 9 at Maryland Hall — featuring the return of guitarist Piotr Pakhomkin.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Contributing Writer | December 14, 1993
A holiday tradition continued Sunday at St. Mark's Church in Catonsville with the first of four performances by the Handel Choir of Baltimore of its namesake's 1742 oratorio, "Messiah." The Handel Choir has presented "Messiah" on an annual basis since 1935, but its most recent production offered no signs of boredom or routine.In general, the four soloists negotiated Handel's demanding vocal writing with distinction. Tenor Robert Petillo's lyrically voiced and sensitively ornamented rendition of "Ev'ry valley" set high standards that were for the most part equaled by his colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff | February 7, 1999
"Messiah," by Andrei Codrescu. Simon & Schuster. 366 pages. $25.The ending of every story, according to this book, is an illusion.Stories, it declares, go on long after both the teller and the telling are finished."Messiah" could have gone on for another thousand pages and still Codrescu -- serving up Scheherazade on the half-shell -- would not have been done.By turns, the story takes place in two of the most fascinating cities on Earth: New Orleans and Jerusalem. The simultaneous sanctity and profanity of those capitals allow the author, the world-class free associator known as the poet Andrei Codrescu, to twist his Transylvanian heart out.Because the novel is about the end of the world (as we know it)
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 28, 2011
The sounds of the season in Howard County always prominently include Columbia Pro Cantare performing portions of Handel's "Messiah. " Of course, there are other Christmas-oriented concerts in the Baltimore area to consider adding to your classical shopping list. When you're not at the mall, you can be at the concert hall. Music director Frances Motyca Dawson leads Columbia Pro Cantare's vocal forces in doing the Christmas Section and Parts II and III of "Messiah" on Sunday, Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Rouse Theatre, at 5460 Trumpeter Road in Wilde Lake.
FEATURES
By TIm Smith and TIm Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 8, 2009
In a city where tradition still counts for a lot, it's worth taking an extra look at the Handel Choir of Baltimore. This weekend marks its 75th annual performance of "Messiah," the most famous oratorio by the ensemble's namesake. In 1935, there probably wasn't a great deal of competition at holiday time for the choir. "This year, there is a landslide of 'Messiahs,' " says Melinda O'Neal, the choir's artistic director and conductor. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra alone is responsible for three versions - last week's annual complete performance of the work, a gospel version this weekend, and a mix of the two for a community singalong on Wednesday.
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