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By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
WASHINGTON --Documents captured from Iraqi insurgents indicate that some of the recent fatal attacks against U.S. helicopters are the result of a carefully planned strategy to focus on downing coalition aircraft, one that U.S. officials say has been carried out by mounting coordinated assaults with machine guns, rockets and surface-to-air missiles. The documents, which are said to have been drafted by al-Qaida in Mesopotamia, show that the militants were preparing to "concentrate on the air force."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
WASHINGTON --Documents captured from Iraqi insurgents indicate that some of the recent fatal attacks against U.S. helicopters are the result of a carefully planned strategy to focus on downing coalition aircraft, one that U.S. officials say has been carried out by mounting coordinated assaults with machine guns, rockets and surface-to-air missiles. The documents, which are said to have been drafted by al-Qaida in Mesopotamia, show that the militants were preparing to "concentrate on the air force."
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NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon has said that after bombing Iraq unremittingly for five weeks it could see no damage to any of the archaeological, cultural or religious sites that bejewel the cities and riverine delta widely regarded as the birthplace of modern civilization.But archaeologists and scholars of the ancient Middle East are skeptical that all of the often-rickety structures and priceless artifacts -- some over 5,000 years old -- will emerge unscathed from the relentless pounding of ground around them -- especially in or near the northern Mesopotamian cities of Samarra and Mosul, where intensive bombing has occurred, and the capital, Baghdad.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 16, 2005
Excavations at a ruined city on the plains of northeastern Syria have turned up the oldest known example of large-scale warfare -- an ancient campaign that pummeled the city into submission at the dawn of civilization more than 5,500 years ago, researchers said yesterday. The discovery of the devastated remains of the ancient trading center suggests that the urge to attack and conquer cities is as old and basic as the need to build them, the researchers said. "This clearly was no minor skirmish," said archaeologist Clemens Reichel of the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, who led the team of archeologists who made the discovery.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
New excavations on the eastern Nile Delta show that ancient Egyptians had large-scale glassmaking operations several hundred years earlier than researchers had believed, and the archaeological remains provide the first solid evidence about how they did it, British and German researchers report. The glass factory at Piramesses, which probably began production around 1250 B.C. -- about 100 years after the reign of King Tutankhamen -- used a two-step process in which pulverized quartz was heated with plant ash in ceramic jars to form a crude solid.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1997
Had a fish been chosen as the national emblem instead of a big bird, George Reiger contends, we'd all be venerating the striped bass. (Would not Marylanders have defied any such statute, still calling them rockfish?) Stripers range the coasts, adapt to rivers, taste great.Reiger, an editor at Field & Stream and the author of many books on angling, used to teach at the Naval Academy; one of the many good stories in "The Striped Bass Chronicles: The Saga of America's Great Game Fish" (Lyons & Burford, 192 pages, $22.95)
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 16, 2005
Excavations at a ruined city on the plains of northeastern Syria have turned up the oldest known example of large-scale warfare -- an ancient campaign that pummeled the city into submission at the dawn of civilization more than 5,500 years ago, researchers said yesterday. The discovery of the devastated remains of the ancient trading center suggests that the urge to attack and conquer cities is as old and basic as the need to build them, the researchers said. "This clearly was no minor skirmish," said archaeologist Clemens Reichel of the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, who led the team of archeologists who made the discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 13, 2001
"Libraries in the Ancient World," by Lionel Casson (Yale University Press, 177 pages, $22.95). With today's explosion of knowledge and book publishing, compounded by electronics, there's much discussion and controversy over the role and responsibilities of libraries. It's fair to assume that books have always been kept and catalogued. But it has often been a battle. This remarkably readable and provocative little volume goes to the origins of libraries -- clay tablets stored by the Sumerians of Mesopotamia shortly before 3000 B.C. From there, with scholarly attention to archaeology as well as literature, Casson traces the trials and development of libraries in ancient Greece, Alexandria, Rome and into the Middle Ages.
NEWS
September 29, 2011
Like most such dialogues, the recent discussions about Israel and Palestine at the U.N. ignore international treaty law ("Bid for statehood may end," Sept. 21). Jews were given legal and political rights to what is now called Palestine in 1920, when the four principal allied powers of World War I - Great Britain, France,Italy and Japan - formalized the Balfour Declaration at San Remo, Italy. Arab representatives agreed to this in exchange for recognition of their territorial claims in Mesopotamia and elsewhere.
NEWS
May 9, 1993
* Dorothy B. Hughes, 88, a mystery writer as well as a critic and historian of mystery fiction, died of complications from a stroke Thursday at her home in Ashland, Ore. She wrote 14 mystery novels, most of them set in the Southwest and involving an upper-class hero caught up in evil intrigue. Her best-known works include "The Cross-Eyed Bear" (1940), "Ride the Pink Horse" (1946), "The Expendable Man" (1964) and "In a Lonely Place" (1947), which was made into a movie starring Humphrey Bogart.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
New excavations on the eastern Nile Delta show that ancient Egyptians had large-scale glassmaking operations several hundred years earlier than researchers had believed, and the archaeological remains provide the first solid evidence about how they did it, British and German researchers report. The glass factory at Piramesses, which probably began production around 1250 B.C. -- about 100 years after the reign of King Tutankhamen -- used a two-step process in which pulverized quartz was heated with plant ash in ceramic jars to form a crude solid.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1997
Had a fish been chosen as the national emblem instead of a big bird, George Reiger contends, we'd all be venerating the striped bass. (Would not Marylanders have defied any such statute, still calling them rockfish?) Stripers range the coasts, adapt to rivers, taste great.Reiger, an editor at Field & Stream and the author of many books on angling, used to teach at the Naval Academy; one of the many good stories in "The Striped Bass Chronicles: The Saga of America's Great Game Fish" (Lyons & Burford, 192 pages, $22.95)
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon has said that after bombing Iraq unremittingly for five weeks it could see no damage to any of the archaeological, cultural or religious sites that bejewel the cities and riverine delta widely regarded as the birthplace of modern civilization.But archaeologists and scholars of the ancient Middle East are skeptical that all of the often-rickety structures and priceless artifacts -- some over 5,000 years old -- will emerge unscathed from the relentless pounding of ground around them -- especially in or near the northern Mesopotamian cities of Samarra and Mosul, where intensive bombing has occurred, and the capital, Baghdad.
NEWS
By Linell Smith | February 21, 1991
Thousands of years ago the people who lived in the land tha is now Iraq invented the wheel, developed writing, built the world's earliest cities and laid most of the groundwork for our lives today.It was also in Mesopotamia - the green countryside near the Tigris and Euphrates rivers - that people discovered that monumental art could serve as a powerful expression of life.A few examples remain. Ruins of the Tower of Babel, the greatest architectural wonder of the ancient world, are in the partially excavated city of Babylon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2007
THEATER 'LEAR' IN MESOPOTAMIA In one of the first offerings in the six-month Shakespeare in Washington festival, Baltimore native and two-time Tony Award nominee Andre de Shields tackles one of Shakespeare's most daunting roles -- aging, misguided King Lear. The co-production with the Classical Theatre of Harlem opens tonight at Washington's Folger Theatre after engagements in New York and Miami. Director Alfred Preisser transposes his King Lear to Mesopotamia at the time of the Code of Hammurabi.
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